PipeChat Digest #2921 - Wednesday, June 19, 2002
 
Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by <Phil_Cooper@dot.ca.gov>
Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: music for the one manual organ
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Mollers (trackers, that is) reply
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Moller Tracker
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Mollers
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 12:59:34 -0700         > > On 6/18/02 4:24 PM, quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   BUD: > > > There are MANY *fine* 19th century one-manual organs still in use that > > CAN play as much literature as a parish church of modest size would = EVER > > require.   RUSS: > > But why on earth would you spec an organ the size of your example and = limit > it to one manual?   BUD:   As I SAID, another possibility would be spreading the resources over two manuals by means of "either-or" double sliders and pallets. Personally, I find that system somewhat of a nuisance. I'd rather have a more complete one-manual organ.   RUSS:   And why do organists think they are fit to decide that a > parish church should live within such arbitrary limitations.   BUD:   Well, perhaps my experience and training is an exception, but I took Organ Class under Fenner Douglass WHILE he was writing "The Language of the French Classical Organ"; I helped assemble the first wave of Flentrops at Oberlin; I was the Organ Curator's assistant as an undergraduate; I was the consultant for the moving and restoration of the Koehnken & Grimm tracker in The Immaculata in Cincinnati. I have been the consultant for a dozen or so organ projects over the years, the latest being my own church ... a 3m Holtkamp of 43 stops in the English Romantic style.   I believe my credentials are in order.   RUSS:   Especially > when, as we so often state as organists, we are installing an instrument > which is going to last effectively forever.   BUD:   Precisely. With the exception of Hammond organs, which are really electro-mechanical organs, rather than true electronic organs, I know of NO electronic organ with an effective lifespan of more than thirty years at the MOST. It remains to be seen whether the present generation of digital organs will exceed that, but the nature of electronic components being what it is, I seriously doubt it.   That sets aside, of course, the question of the QUALITY of the SOUND.   That 1890s K & G we moved and restored required:   (1) releathering the bellows (2) replacing a FEW broken trackers (3) repairing ONE broken stop linkage (4) tuning (5) stripping and refinishing the case, which we CHOSE to do ... it wasn't NECESSARY   The whole project was accomplished for under $10K in the 1970s ... granted, it was a LOCAL move, and the whole organ dept. from the Conservatory pitched in and helped ... but it will play for ANOTHER hundred years with minimal maintenance.   RUSS:   Would this not suggest that we > should be striving for more versatility, not less? > > Cheers, > Russ >   I keep coming back to the needs of the AVERAGE ORGANIST IN A SMALL TO MEDIUM-SIZED CHURCH. That list I posted of repertoire for the small organ EXCEEDS what most AMATEUR/VOLUNTEER organists or pianists drafted to play the organ will EVER tackle.   The AVERAGE church, whether Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican, or Protestant, needs a hymn-playing "machine" that can also handle simple voluntaries and anthem/solo/cantor accompaniments, NOTHING MORE.   Aunt Suzy / Uncle Fester doesn't NEED four manuals and a hundred digital "stops" to play the Widor Toccata ... she/he has probably never HEARD of the Widor Toccata (grin).   NOR does a PIPE organ require large numbers of stops in a large church .... there are MANY examples of small organs in large Roman Catholic churches that fill their buildings ADMIRABLY, due to generous scaling and voicing. It must be said, though, that WITHOUT EXCEPTION these organs enjoy optimum (west-gallery) placement, and VERY spacious acoustics.   Where there is a WILL to have a pipe organ, there will BE one.   My late mother's church had a second-hand 7-stop tubular pneumatic Estey given to them in the late 1930s; it served admirably for many years; that little Estey accompanied hymns, anthems, and Christmas and Easter cantatas (I accompanied "Messiah" on it once, WITHOUT an orchestra) year in and year out ... it SELDOM saw a tuner ... the sexton maintained the ancient blower, and that was about it.   When the new church was in the planning stages, the Estey's pneumatic action was starting to fail, and it wasn't big enough for the new church; there was no QUESTION that there would be a new pipe organ ... and this is a SMALL Methodist congregation in an economically-depressed area in the Deep South. It took a generation of saving the butter-and-egg money, and bake sales and church suppers, but they GOT it.   There were MANY times in the course of our five-year organ project when I was TEMPTED to throw up my hands and say, "Oh, to heck with it ... get a big ***** and be done with it."   But I DIDN'T.   With NO fund-raising effort AT ALL, now that the new church is BUILT, the money is coming in. People point to the big hole above the choir-loft and say, "THAT'S where OUR pipe organ will go." They OWN the project now, though it took five YEARS to educate them to that point.   Of course, it DOES help that I'm old and scary and high-church Anglican (grin), and that we've gone through a succession of electronic substitutes that sputtered and failed on a regular basis (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: <Phil_Cooper@dot.ca.gov> Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 13:12:01 -0700     Bud: BRAVO!! My sentiments exactly!!   Philip T. D. Cooper Davis, CA       = quilisma@socal = .rr.com To: PipeChat = <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent by: cc: = <pipechat@pipe Subject: Re: one-manual pipe = organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) chat.org> = = = 06/19/2002 = 12:59 PM = Please respond = to "PipeChat" = = =               > > On 6/18/02 4:24 PM, quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   BUD: > > > There are MANY *fine* 19th century one-manual organs still in use that > > CAN play as much literature as a parish church of modest size would EVER > > require.   RUSS: > > But why on earth would you spec an organ the size of your example and limit > it to one manual?   BUD:   As I SAID, another possibility would be spreading the resources over two manuals by means of "either-or" double sliders and pallets. Personally, I find that system somewhat of a nuisance. I'd rather have a more complete one-manual organ.   RUSS:   And why do organists think they are fit to decide that a > parish church should live within such arbitrary limitations.   BUD:   Well, perhaps my experience and training is an exception, but I took Organ Class under Fenner Douglass WHILE he was writing "The Language of the French Classical Organ"; I helped assemble the first wave of Flentrops at Oberlin; I was the Organ Curator's assistant as an undergraduate; I was the consultant for the moving and restoration of the Koehnken & Grimm tracker in The Immaculata in Cincinnati. I have been the consultant for a dozen or so organ projects over the years, the latest being my own church ... a 3m Holtkamp of 43 stops in the English Romantic style.   I believe my credentials are in order.   RUSS:   Especially > when, as we so often state as organists, we are installing an instrument > which is going to last effectively forever.   BUD:   Precisely. With the exception of Hammond organs, which are really electro-mechanical organs, rather than true electronic organs, I know of NO electronic organ with an effective lifespan of more than thirty years at the MOST. It remains to be seen whether the present generation of digital organs will exceed that, but the nature of electronic components being what it is, I seriously doubt it.   That sets aside, of course, the question of the QUALITY of the SOUND.   That 1890s K & G we moved and restored required:   (1) releathering the bellows (2) replacing a FEW broken trackers (3) repairing ONE broken stop linkage (4) tuning (5) stripping and refinishing the case, which we CHOSE to do ... it wasn't NECESSARY   The whole project was accomplished for under $10K in the 1970s ... granted, it was a LOCAL move, and the whole organ dept. from the Conservatory pitched in and helped ... but it will play for ANOTHER hundred years with minimal maintenance.   RUSS:   Would this not suggest that we > should be striving for more versatility, not less? > > Cheers, > Russ >   I keep coming back to the needs of the AVERAGE ORGANIST IN A SMALL TO MEDIUM-SIZED CHURCH. That list I posted of repertoire for the small organ EXCEEDS what most AMATEUR/VOLUNTEER organists or pianists drafted to play the organ will EVER tackle.   The AVERAGE church, whether Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican, or Protestant, needs a hymn-playing "machine" that can also handle simple voluntaries and anthem/solo/cantor accompaniments, NOTHING MORE.   Aunt Suzy / Uncle Fester doesn't NEED four manuals and a hundred digital "stops" to play the Widor Toccata ... she/he has probably never HEARD of the Widor Toccata (grin).   NOR does a PIPE organ require large numbers of stops in a large church .... there are MANY examples of small organs in large Roman Catholic churches that fill their buildings ADMIRABLY, due to generous scaling and voicing. It must be said, though, that WITHOUT EXCEPTION these organs enjoy optimum (west-gallery) placement, and VERY spacious acoustics.   Where there is a WILL to have a pipe organ, there will BE one.   My late mother's church had a second-hand 7-stop tubular pneumatic Estey given to them in the late 1930s; it served admirably for many years; that little Estey accompanied hymns, anthems, and Christmas and Easter cantatas (I accompanied "Messiah" on it once, WITHOUT an orchestra) year in and year out ... it SELDOM saw a tuner ... the sexton maintained the ancient blower, and that was about it.   When the new church was in the planning stages, the Estey's pneumatic action was starting to fail, and it wasn't big enough for the new church; there was no QUESTION that there would be a new pipe organ ... and this is a SMALL Methodist congregation in an economically-depressed area in the Deep South. It took a generation of saving the butter-and-egg money, and bake sales and church suppers, but they GOT it.   There were MANY times in the course of our five-year organ project when I was TEMPTED to throw up my hands and say, "Oh, to heck with it ... get a big ***** and be done with it."   But I DIDN'T.   With NO fund-raising effort AT ALL, now that the new church is BUILT, the money is coming in. People point to the big hole above the choir-loft and say, "THAT'S where OUR pipe organ will go." They OWN the project now, though it took five YEARS to educate them to that point.   Of course, it DOES help that I'm old and scary and high-church Anglican (grin), and that we've gone through a succession of electronic substitutes that sputtered and failed on a regular basis (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 16:30:22 -0500   At 01:28 PM 6/19/02 -0500, you wrote: >On 6/18/02 4:24 PM, quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > There are MANY *fine* 19th century one-manual organs still in use that > > CAN play as much literature as a parish church of modest size would = EVER > > require.   At one time I would have agreed with all those who think a one manual = organ is a bad idea. Having been to enough OHS conventions and heard some fantastic one manual instruments, I would rather think the organist would be the problem. It takes an extremely talented artist to get the most out of a small instrument. It is far easier to play a four manual organ than a =   one manual.   jch    
(back) Subject: Re: music for the one manual organ From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 17:39:11 EDT     --part1_167.f7b04cc.2a4253ff_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/18/02 7:26:59 PM Atlantic Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > Boellmann - the harmonium pieces (Heures Mystiques?)   I would also add the Suite Gothique, excluding the toccata. The music = fits very well and there isn't much more that exceeds it in beauty.   Bruce in the Muttestery   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg   --part1_167.f7b04cc.2a4253ff_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 6/18/02 7:26:59 PM Atlantic = Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Boellmann - the = harmonium pieces (Heures Mystiques?)</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> I would also add the Suite Gothique, excluding the = toccata.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The music fits very well and there isn't much = more that exceeds it in beauty.<BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_167.f7b04cc.2a4253ff_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Mollers (trackers, that is) reply From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 17:51:55 EDT     --part1_15e.f75fe2b.2a4256fb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/19/2002 1:42:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time, bridgewatermusic@hotmail.com writes:     > Just out of interest, does anyone know when Molller stopped making = tracker > instruments? Several years ago I played what was believed to be the = oldest > Moller in use at the time in Cumberland Md. It was in pretty bad shape = but > not a bad sound. I have since forgotten the supposed date of its > completion > but it is original to the building, so I would expect that it was = 1875-85 > era, perhaps older. > > Craig >   Not a simple answer, but here goes...   Moller was building both tracker and tubular-pneumatic organs in the = period around 1914 (I have serviced a couple of Moller organs from this time period)...   BUT   in their very own effort to participate in the "organ revival movement" = they built a number of mechanical-action organs in the 1970's and into the = early 80's, some built under the supervision of Cristoph LInde (not sure of the exact spelling of his name). Among these organs were several 2-manual "A-Frame" model organs of about 18 or so ranks, and several 2 and 3 manual =   organs in Free-standing cases in the more traditional "north German" = baroque style. One of the 3-manual organs is at Shanendoah Conservatory in = Winchester VA, and there is a 'sister" organ to that one in a downtown church (also = in Winchester, tho memory fails me as to the name of the church.)   Bridgewater College, Bridgewater VA has a 2-manual "A-Frame" MOller from about 1976 (or so). It currently resides in Memorial Hall, but they are planning to move it to another building, as the music dept. has been relocated.   Bridgewater College also posesses a 2-manual, 10 rank Reuter from about = 1955, an earlier 4-rank Reuter unit organ, and their big recital organ in Cole Hall, a 3 manual, 60-something rank MOller from 1973.   --part1_15e.f75fe2b.2a4256fb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 6/19/2002 1:42:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time, bridgewatermusic@hotmail.com = writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Just out of = interest, does anyone know when Molller stopped making tracker <BR>instruments? &nbsp;Several years ago I played what was believed to be = the oldest <BR>Moller in use at the time in Cumberland Md. &nbsp;It was in pretty bad = shape but <BR>not a bad sound. &nbsp;I have since forgotten the supposed date of its = completion <BR>but it is original to the building, so I would expect that it was = 1875-85 <BR>era, perhaps older. <BR> <BR>Craig <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Not a simple answer, but here goes... <BR> <BR>Moller was building both tracker and tubular-pneumatic organs in the = period around 1914 (I have serviced a couple of Moller organs from this = time period)... <BR> <BR>BUT <BR> <BR>in their very own effort to participate in the "organ revival = movement" they built a number of mechanical-action organs in the 1970's = and into the early 80's, some built under the supervision of Cristoph = LInde (not sure of the exact spelling of his name). Among these organs = were &nbsp;several 2-manual "A-Frame" model organs of about 18 or so = ranks, and several 2 and 3 manual organs in Free-standing cases in the = more traditional &nbsp;"north German" baroque style. One of the 3-manual = organs is at Shanendoah Conservatory in Winchester VA, and there is a = 'sister" organ to that one in a downtown church (also in Winchester, tho = memory fails me as to the name of the church.) <BR> <BR>Bridgewater College, Bridgewater VA has a 2-manual "A-Frame" MOller = from about 1976 (or so). It currently resides in Memorial Hall, but they = are planning to move it to another building, as the music dept. has been = relocated. <BR> <BR>Bridgewater College also posesses a 2-manual, 10 rank Reuter from about 1955, an earlier 4-rank Reuter = unit organ, and their big recital organ in Cole Hall, a 3 manual, = 60-something rank MOller from 1973.</FONT></HTML>   --part1_15e.f75fe2b.2a4256fb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Moller Tracker From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 16:54:04 -0500   You may be right.......all I can remember for sure is that the Moller tracker in question was recent and in the deep south. There can't be too many recent Moller trackers in the deep south (or anywhere for that = matter!)   Dennis Steckley "For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God." _______________________________________________ Subject: Re: Mollers From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 12:04:00 -0500   >Somewhere in Alabama is a rare (recent!) Moller tracker; at a Baptist >church, I believe.   You may confusing that with the Moller Tracker at Northminster Baptist Church in Monroe, LA. - http://www.northmin.com/music.html Scroll down the page for the Organ information.   David    
(back) Subject: Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 18:09:32 EDT     --part1_30.288fe7c0.2a425b1c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/19/02 3:29:22 PM Atlantic Daylight Time, rggreene2@shaw.ca writes: > And why do organists think they are fit to decide that a > parish church should live within such arbitrary limitations. Especially > when, as we so often state as organists, we are installing an instrument > which is going to last effectively forever.   Sadly, the people who remind us that the "organists who will follow" only seem to consider that those organists will have taste identical to their = own.     Much better to live within beautiful arbitrary limitations that to have a large arsenal of mediocre reproduced ones.     Bruce in the Muttestery   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg   --part1_30.288fe7c0.2a425b1c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 6/19/02 3:29:22 PM Atlantic = Daylight Time, rggreene2@shaw.ca writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">And why do = organists think they are fit to decide that a<BR> parish church should live within such arbitrary limitations. = Especially<BR> when, as we so often state as organists, we are installing an = instrument<BR> which is going to last effectively forever. </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> Sadly, the people who remind us that the "organists who will follow" only = seem to consider that those organists will have taste identical to their = own. <BR> <BR> Much better to live within beautiful arbitrary limitations that to have a = large arsenal of mediocre reproduced ones.<BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_30.288fe7c0.2a425b1c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 17:15:37 -0500   On 6/19/02 2:05 PM, COLASACCO, ROBERT wrote:   > I assume you are employed by Allen Organs? I don't know, I'm just = asking.   Absolutely not. The only organ company I have ever even interviewed with = was Austin Organs. No, I am in fact a pipe organ enthusiast, learned to play = and had practice privleges on a number of exquisite pipe organs, and have had both pipe and digital organs in the various parishes where I have been Organist/Choirmaster over the last 43 years. I owned my own Allen for a number of years but sold it to a church in favor of an extensive home = music studio filled with MIDI gear and keyboards.   Being a pipe enthusiast doesn't mean being blind to their downsides. Many people on the list don't seem to understand that - they think if you're = not over the moon about every single pipe organ that you must be a digital salesman. An interesting blind spot that too many organists have.   Many pipe organs are good but at least as many are frankly mediocre; some are downright awful; others are merely so small as to have limited value = for my purposes. Some pipe organs however are absolutely awesome!   The digitals I have known, mostly Allens mainly because they sell the = most, have fallen in the mid-range of the above. Some have been quite good, a = few have been great but none have been awesome; many have been mediocre. On = the other hand, none have been downright awful and none have been so small as = to be useless.   Your experience may be different. My perspective spans over 45 years of playing, 43 of it professionally, and includes pipe and digital organs played and listened to in over forty countries. It doesn't include any experience, however, as an Allen salesman.   TTFN, Russ    
(back) Subject: Re: Mollers From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 18:20:06 EDT     --part1_a9.292f9a29.2a425d96_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/19/02 4:01:23 PM Atlantic Daylight Time, bridgewatermusic@hotmail.com writes: > Just out of interest, does anyone know when Molller stopped making = tracker > instruments?   Moller made many tracker organs before 1900. I participated in the restoration of a 2/15 built in 1908; it it a lovely organ with a very = gentle sound.   Bruce in the Muttestery   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg   --part1_a9.292f9a29.2a425d96_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 6/19/02 4:01:23 PM Atlantic = Daylight Time, bridgewatermusic@hotmail.com writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Just out of = interest, does anyone know when Molller stopped making tracker <BR> instruments?&nbsp; </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> Moller made many tracker organs before 1900.&nbsp;&nbsp; I participated in = the restoration of a 2/15 built in 1908;&nbsp; it it a lovely organ with a = very gentle sound.<BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_a9.292f9a29.2a425d96_boundary--