PipeChat Digest #2925 - Thursday, June 20, 2002
 
Re: go east?
  by <MyrtleBeachMusic@aol.com>
Re: Gress-Miles
  by "r_ehrh" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net>
Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: The One-Manual Market
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Hey, Bruce Cornely . . .
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Email addresss for Ross Wards.
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
Re: Digital creativity
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
RE: Dr. Hall Tours the UK, Part Two (LONG)
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re:  The one-manual market
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re:  The one-manual market
  by <Phil_Cooper@dot.ca.gov>
Re:  The one-manual market
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Archive?
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
one-manual organs
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Re: go east? From: <MyrtleBeachMusic@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 10:22:46 EDT     --part1_7c.29af5808.2a433f36_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/20/2002 8:44:15 AM Eastern Daylight Time, MFoxy9795@aol.com writes:     > <<If I were younger and starting out, rather in my last years, I would = go > east where the services are still traditional and organists are still > respected members of the staff. But, where do we go from here? Lee>> > > interesting. i am in the east, but i was thinking i would have to go > elsewhere so i could find a place where organists are "still respected > members of the staff"... > merry   That would be......the SOUTH.   Jeremy.....SC   --part1_7c.29af5808.2a433f36_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 6/20/2002 8:44:15 AM Eastern = Daylight Time, MFoxy9795@aol.com writes:<BR> <BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">&lt;&lt;If I were = younger and starting out, rather in my last years, I would go east where = the services are still traditional and organists are still respected = members of the staff.&nbsp; But, where do we go from here?&nbsp; = Lee&gt;&gt;<BR> <BR> interesting.&nbsp; i am in the east, but i was thinking i would have to go = elsewhere so i could find a place where organists are "still respected = members of the staff"...<BR> merry</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> That would be......the SOUTH.<BR> <BR> Jeremy.....SC</FONT></HTML>   --part1_7c.29af5808.2a433f36_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Gress-Miles From: "r_ehrh" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 09:18:10 -0500   This organ was originally Aeolian-Skinner Opus 1082 and featured the = divided Swell at that time. This was also done on Opus 1391 in St. Mark's = Episcopal Church, Beaumont, TX. I have played this organ and found this most effective. There is also a two-manual Schantz here in Broadmoor = Presbyterian with a divided Swell which is very flexible.   Robert Ehrhardt Noel Memorial UMC Shreveport, LA http://www.zimbel.com/ehrhardt.html   ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2002 8:25 PM Subject: Re: Gress-Miles     > > > Ross & Lynda Wards wrote: > > > > Just yesterday I spent a whopping and outrageous one dollar in a 1963 = lp > > recording of Robert Owen playing big works on the Gress-Miles organ in > > Christ Church, Bronxville, New York. The organ is a 3-manual & Pedal = of five > > divisions and 68rks, 3877 pipes (that's how the record jacket = describes it > > and then gives the specification). > > Is Gress-Miles regarded as a good firm? > > Is the firm still going? > > Is this organ regarded as a good one? > > Is it still the same or has it been altered? > > When was it built? > > > > For what it's worth, judging only from the record, it seems pretty = heavy and > > overly "masculine", if that's the right word, possibly too big for the > > building it's in. I wonder how four manual divisions on three manuals works > > out in practice, this one having Great, Positiv, Swell I and Swell II. > > > > Ross > > > > I think (mercifully) they no longer exist. > > My limited experience with them: the STRINGS would part your HAIR, and > they went UP from THERE (grin). > > The divided Swell business IS useful in organs that don't have enclosed > Choir organs, PROVIDED the two Swell divisions couple independently. > > The (Los Angeles) Johnson Organ Co / Gillette Aeolian-Skinner / unknown > consortium organ in St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral in San Diego > California has such an arrangement, which is a blessing ... the newer > unenclosed work takes after Gress-Miles, above (chuckle) ... the Canon > Liturgist used to wear EAR PLUGS when he had to sing the High Mass. I > think at last count there were THREE batteries of unenclosed reeds. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 11:23:38 EDT     --part1_4d.1fe23e87.2a434d7a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   In a message dated 6/19/02 7:48:34 PM Atlantic Daylight Time,=3D20 rggreene2@shaw.ca writes:=3D20 > What I want in a church organ is as much versatility as possible, = knowing=3D20 > that it will be called upon to perform a wide range of tasks during = its=3D20 > lifetime. This does not imply mediocrity but rather intelligent = compromise=3D =3D20 > leaning toward the organ=3DE2=3D80=3D99s use rather than the = organist=3DE2=3D80=3D99s=3D20=3D particular=3D20 > artistic bias.   What you "want" almost demands mediocrity, since you want it ALL = regardless=3D20 of the size of the instrument. Many things an organ is expected to = do=3D20 should be done by a piano or a keyboard. It would also be less expensive = to=3D =3D20 purchase these incidental and often trendy instruments as they are = desired=3D20 rather than purchasing an substitute instrument which does NOTHING=3D20 authentically: unsatisfactory pipe organ sound, unsatisfactory piano = sound=3D =3D20 (strangely they do reasonable harpsichord!) and worst of all, = seriously=3D20 unsatisfactory modern keyboard sounds. An architect once said to = a=3D20 committee desiring a multifunctional room that "the more multifunctional = a=3D20 room is, the less functional it is." The same applies to organs. =3D20   The smaller the church the less the organ needs to do and even more = importan=3D t=3D20 that it should do ITS job well and be easy to use. A one manual = tracker=3D20 without pedals or pistons is far easier to use than a 2m electronic = with=3D20 pedals and more pistons than stops.     Bruce in the Muttestery=3D20   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">H=3D owlingAcres</A> http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg=3D20   --part1_4d.1fe23e87.2a434d7a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">In a message dated 6/19/02 7:48:34 PM Atlantic = Dayligh=3D t Time, rggreene2@shaw.ca writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">What I want in a church organ = i=3D s as much versatility as possible, knowing that it will be called upon to = pe=3D rform a wide range of tasks during its lifetime. This does not imply = mediocr=3D ity but rather intelligent compromise leaning toward the = organ=3DE2=3D80=3D99s use=3D rather than the organist=3DE2=3D80=3D99s particular artistic = bias.</BLOCKQUOTE><B=3D R> <BR> What you "want" almost demands mediocrity, since you want it ALL = regardless=3D20=3D of the size of the instrument.&nbsp;&nbsp; Many things an organ is = expected=3D20=3D to do should be done by a piano or a keyboard.&nbsp; It would also be less = e=3D xpensive to purchase these incidental and often trendy instruments as they = a=3D re desired rather than purchasing an substitute instrument which does = NOTHIN=3D G authentically:&nbsp;&nbsp; unsatisfactory pipe organ sound, = unsatisfactory=3D piano sound (strangely they do reasonable harpsichord!) and worst of all, = s=3D eriously unsatisfactory modern keyboard sounds.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; An = a=3D rchitect once said to a committee desiring a multifunctional room that = "the=3D20=3D more multifunctional a room is, the less functional it is."&nbsp;&nbsp; = The=3D20=3D same applies to organs.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR> The smaller the church the less the organ needs to do and even more = importan=3D t that it should do ITS job well and be easy to use.&nbsp;&nbsp; A one = manua=3D l tracker without pedals or pistons is far easier to use than a 2m = electroni=3D c with pedals and more pistons than stops.<BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon5=3D 02">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visio=3D nsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_4d.1fe23e87.2a434d7a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: The One-Manual Market From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 10:27:25 -0500   On 6/19/02 6:46 PM, TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Will a one-manual pipe organ help or hurt the cause?   Thank you Sebastian. Your comments really clarify what I've been trying to express.   Cheers, Russ    
(back) Subject: Re: Hey, Bruce Cornely . . . From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 11:29:31 EDT     --part1_5b.2994c929.2a434edb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I'm not sure when the organ will be completed... last estimate was some = time in July. The dedicatory festivities start in September. I'll look for = the schedule and get back to you.   Bruce in the Muttestery   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg   --part1_5b.2994c929.2a434edb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I'm not sure when the organ will be completed... = last estimate was some time in July.&nbsp; The dedicatory festivities = start in September.&nbsp;&nbsp; I'll look for the schedule and get back to = you.<BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_5b.2994c929.2a434edb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Email addresss for Ross Wards. From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 10:30:43 -0500   Ross,   Please send me your email address. Would like to be able to send you a message privately.   Sand Lawn   >      
(back) Subject: Re: Digital creativity From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 11:17:03 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --Boundary_(ID_S1SZIwtEvvI8IJDOKDrfyg) Content-type: text/plain; charset=3DISO-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 6/20/02 2:43 AM, MusicMan wrote:   > Good to see (and hear) that anything which stirs the soul of just one = mem=3D ber > of a congregation is not 'banned' from performance....however (and if = thi=3D s is > politically uncorrect - "well frankly, I couldn't give a damn") > 'aboriginals'...? in Canada ... ?   Well Harry,   Our =3DB3Indians=3DB2 have transformed into =3DB3Natives=3DB2, = transmorgified to =3DB3First Nations Peoples=3DB2, and finally settled, for this month, on = =3DB3aboriginals=3DB2 as the latest politically correct term for the descendants of those who lived here prior to the European invasion. And an influential group they are!   Regards, Russ   --Boundary_(ID_S1SZIwtEvvI8IJDOKDrfyg) Content-type: text/html; charset=3DISO-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Digital creativity</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D"Helvetica">On 6/20/02 2:43 AM, MusicMan wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D"Helvetica">Good to see (and hear) that = anything which stirs the soul of just one member of a congregation is not = 'banned' from performance....however (and if this is politically uncorrect = - &quot;well frankly, I couldn't give a damn&quot;) 'aboriginals'...? in = Canada &nbsp;... ?<BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D"Helvetica"><BR> Well Harry,<BR> <BR> Our &#8220;Indians&#8221; have transformed into &#8220;Natives&#8221;, = transmorgified to &#8220;First Nations Peoples&#8221;, and finally = settled, for this month, on &#8220;aboriginals&#8221; as the latest = politically correct term for the descendants of those who lived here prior = to the European invasion. And an influential group they are!<BR> <BR> Regards,<BR> Russ</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --Boundary_(ID_S1SZIwtEvvI8IJDOKDrfyg)--  
(back) Subject: RE: Dr. Hall Tours the UK, Part Two (LONG) From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 11:58:28 -0500   J:   These stories are absolutley marvelous reading. Of course, I know some of the characters, but even so....   P   PS If you are going to AGO will you stop by the exhibits and play the Oberlinger organ John Nisbet has set up there? I would value your opinion of it.    
(back) Subject: Re: The one-manual market From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 14:27:30 EDT   Greetings Listers,   I fear that this dialogue is again heading toward the trash heap of pipes = vs digital, a road well-traveled and littered with the evidence that there = will be no prevailing side to claim victory. But an observation made this = morning in reading this thread.   Phil Cooper submits:   >NOT ENTIRELY TRUE! The one manual organ will play a great deal of >literature. <<   Yes indeed, Phil. But what of the church where "literature" is as foreign = to their worship experience as incense would be to Southern Baptists? What = of the church where the organist has little if any formal training, thus the understanding of registration is all but absent? What of the church where =   versatility is desired, perhaps even required, more than the ability to faithfully render "literature?" What of the church where the organ's principal role is accompanying congregational singing, choral anthems by volunteer and untrained voices, and the Prelude, Offertory, and Postlude = are not drawn from "literature?" Whether we choose to admit, much less accept =   the fact, there are probably more churches that fit this example than = those where orthodox liturgy and tradition dictate the worship form and the need =   for recognized literature performed by capable organists. Are these = churches not worthy of an organ but, if so, would they be better served with a = small one-manual pipe organ of limited versatility?   Of course, we could make the argument that they would be just as satisfied =   with a Horner Harmonica since they would not know the difference anyway or =   realize that the difference actually exists. This would be self-serving = and unrealistic. Considering that many churches do not use nor appreciate accepted organ literature as vital to their worship experience, are we not = a bit hasty in attempting to saddle them with an instrument whose primary function is centered on that ability?   And while I am on this rant, an additional question. Are we as organists = of the opinion that churches purchase and install organs for our = gratification, to our standards, to our specifications or do they buy them for the needs = of the church? I have often wondered about this and, from the tenor of comments made on list, am beginning to develop a leaning with which I am not comfortable. Lest I be misread, I still prefer pipes to any other medium, but I am not prepared to say that I prefer a one-manual pipe organ to the exclusion of = any other form, particularly in the example I cited above.   Having stated these comments, I am now prepared for my induction into the Persona- non-grata club where I shall be required to play "Jesus Loves Me, =   This I Know" repeatedly on a small self-contained digital with no reverberation.   Best wishes, Jim Pitts        
(back) Subject: Re: The one-manual market From: <Phil_Cooper@dot.ca.gov> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 11:57:00 -0700     Jim - I still think that I'm not being entirely clear somehow. I totally agree with you that many, many (if not the majority) of American churches are just as you have described them below. But, in a way, that is my point. When I was a boy, my father, who was an Episcopal priest, used to take summer services for other priests on vacation and most of the time, I used to go with him. On many occasions, I recall an "Aunt Suzy/ Uncle Fester" who was really only trained as a PIANIST and had little or no understanding of the organ. I cannot help but think that these folks = would find a simple one manual organ that is merely functional much more like a piano than some instrument with all sorts of gadgets. This "just sit and play the hymns" approach is far less threatening to those who have only played the piano. At the same time, the congregation has in their possession, an instrument of integrity, beauty, and the ability to do all the things that it needs to do in this small American church. In = addition, it will outlast all of us.   Finally, these installations are not just "for my gratifications" or "for my standards". I never suggested that they were. Rather, I firmly = believe in carefully taking each church's individual needs into consideration and helping them find an organ that they will love and cherish and one that will work well for them. I'm afraid I don't quite understand various posters' opinions that organists should not play a large part of this decision-making process. Are we not trained to help church committees? = Do we not have more experience in these matters than they? I myself, have served as advisor for many churches and historical societies including my own church here in California. I have formal training under the best of teachers and have nearly 30+ years of experience playing more organs than = I can count. As another poster put it, my credentials are in order.   AGAIN - my only point is - as it has always been: one manual organs are a viable option for small, rural American churches with limited space and budget. There is a lot of wonderful music you can play on them and they are simple enough for the average non-organist and/or volunteer who might be playing it on Sunday mornings. In addition, they can be had second = hand (most notably from the Organ Clearing House) for a fraction of the cost of a new organ. Period.   Philip T. D. Cooper Davis, California       = Wurlibird1@aol = .com To: pipechat@pipechat.org = Sent by: cc: = <pipechat@pipe Subject: Re: The one-manual = market chat.org> = = = 06/20/2002 = 11:27 AM = Please respond = to "PipeChat" = = =         Greetings Listers,   I fear that this dialogue is again heading toward the trash heap of pipes vs digital, a road well-traveled and littered with the evidence that there will be no prevailing side to claim victory. But an observation made this morning in reading this thread.   Phil Cooper submits:   >NOT ENTIRELY TRUE! The one manual organ will play a great deal of >literature. <<   Yes indeed, Phil. But what of the church where "literature" is as foreign to their worship experience as incense would be to Southern Baptists? What = of the church where the organist has little if any formal training, thus the understanding of registration is all but absent? What of the church where versatility is desired, perhaps even required, more than the ability to faithfully render "literature?" What of the church where the organ's principal role is accompanying congregational singing, choral anthems by volunteer and untrained voices, and the Prelude, Offertory, and Postlude are not drawn from "literature?" Whether we choose to admit, much less accept the fact, there are probably more churches that fit this example than = those where orthodox liturgy and tradition dictate the worship form and the need for recognized literature performed by capable organists. Are these churches not worthy of an organ but, if so, would they be better served with a = small one-manual pipe organ of limited versatility?   Of course, we could make the argument that they would be just as satisfied with a Horner Harmonica since they would not know the difference anyway or realize that the difference actually exists. This would be self-serving and unrealistic. Considering that many churches do not use nor appreciate accepted organ literature as vital to their worship experience, are we not a bit hasty in attempting to saddle them with an instrument whose primary function is centered on that ability?   And while I am on this rant, an additional question. Are we as organists of the opinion that churches purchase and install organs for our gratification, to our standards, to our specifications or do they buy them for the needs of the church? I have often wondered about this and, from the tenor of comments made on list, am beginning to develop a leaning with which I am not comfortable. Lest I be misread, I still prefer pipes to any other medium, but I am not prepared to say that I prefer a one-manual pipe organ to the exclusion of any other form, particularly in the example I cited above.   Having stated these comments, I am now prepared for my induction into the Persona- non-grata club where I shall be required to play "Jesus Loves Me, This I Know" repeatedly on a small self-contained digital with no reverberation.   Best wishes, Jim Pitts         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: Re: The one-manual market From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 14:26:26 -0500   At 11:57 AM 6/20/02 -0700, you wrote: >. In addition, they can be had second hand >(most notably from the Organ Clearing House) for a fraction of the cost = of >a new organ. Period.   Not to mention that 30 years from now (or I suspect much sooner) when it = is time to replace that plug-in organ, that one manual tracker will still be truck'n along.   jch        
(back) Subject: Archive? From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 15:35:51 -0400   So what happened to updating the Archives? I've gone in to search = something from a week or so ago to find out that the last update was in December 2000!!!! Tsk, tsk ,tsk. Is there an alternative to finding something more recent? I'm seeking part one of Dr. Hall does the UK, or something like that. Thank you, Robert B. Colasacco    
(back) Subject: one-manual organs From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 08:27:21 +1200   A one-manual pipe-organ is certainly a lot easier for a rank (deliberate pun) amateur to play than something bigger in the electronic line. The = fewer the knobs the better. If there are no pistons, better still. That way, the organist MUST experiement and use "what sounds OK".   A church I know here bought an 1863 Bryceson (of England) for below = peanuts in cost. A local organbuilder helped them restore the action themselves - i.e. a couple of old men in the congregation spent hours releathering pneumatic motors etc. The organ is in a church seating only about 150, and they get about 80 at a Service. The design is really odd, but the tone is wonderful and the thing is quite versatile. All is built on a massive = scale. The Open Diapason is unenclosed and in the showcase, the Bourdon at the sides. All else is enclosed and not one pipe inside the box is mitred or tubed off, to everyone's amazement. Here is the extraordinary design:   MANUAL (tone of the chorus is big and bold) (on slider chest) 8 Open Diapason 8 Horn Diapason (1-12 open wood) 8 Harmonic Diapason (TenC, flutey tone) 8 Claribel (stopt wood 1-12, then open wood) 8 Gamba (down to CC, all tapered) 4 Principal 2 2/3 Twelfth 2 Fifteenth   PEDAL 16 Bourdon (large)   COUPLERS GtOctave GtPed   The church has recently bought (for virtually nothing) a beat-up old electrified one-manual of roughly the same vintage and installed this as well, as a second manual. So the church now has the grand distinction of having the only organ that we know of that has an enclosed Great and and unenclosed Swell!!! Actually, the manuals are known as Great and Choir.   CHOIR 8 Stopped Diapason (wood, very old, probably 1829) 4 Principal (transposed from TenC 8ft) 4 Flute (open wood) 2 Flautina (mostly stopt metal, was an 8ft, top two octaves got from somewhere else in open metal)   And they've added ChGt and ChPed couplers.   As the organist says, "Now I can play anything from Bach, including the Orgelbuchelin". Total cost - about that of a cheap electronic piano, way cheaper than anything electronic. And it's all musical pipes that have = been maturing for 140 years, some of them 173 years.   Go figure, if that's the right American expression. ;-) Ross