PipeChat Digest #2926 - Thursday, June 20, 2002
 
small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP!
  by <Pologaptommy@aol.com>
Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP!
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@VASSAR.EDU>
Re: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP!
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP!
  by "BridgewaterUMC Director of Music" <bridgewatermusic@hotmail.c
Re: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP!
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: The one-manual market
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Europe Organ Crawl
  by <patmai@juno.com>
RE: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP!
  by "Nance, Daryel" <DNance@svdp-edu.org>
Re: Email addresss for Ross Wards.
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
Re: Mollers
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
 

(back) Subject: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP! From: <Pologaptommy@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 16:53:26 EDT   Hi all! At the church, where I am organist, we have a lovely 100 seat = chapel, which we use for Sunday evening services, and Wednesday services. The chapel, which has excellent acoustics due to the coved ceilings, contains = a 2 manual Digital Allen Organ, self contained. This organ, no matter how = many stops you use at a time, NEVER has enough sound accompany the often-full room. Now, I would DIE to have a nice small pipe organ in the chapel, and =   who knows it may happen (who knows, maybe if we get a new sanctuary organ soon, we can stick the old pipe organ in the chapel.) But for now, we = need to work with what we have, until we can conjure up an excuse get something =   newer in there. But anyway, there are NO speaker chambers, no place FOR them, and certainly no place to put built-in external speakers; as the = lady who built the chapel has very strict rules about any changes made to the room. I have in my garage, 8 standard size Allen speaker cabinets (yes the huge ones) that I WANT our of my garage! So I decided to donate some of = them to the church, for use in the chapel. BUT they are CERTAINLY not designed =   for exposed use, and they need to be in good taste if they are going to be =   exposed. So here is the question: What could I do about getting a = fuller, nicer sound in the chapel, without the use of built-in speakers? Is there = a way that I could trade the speakers that I DO have, for ones that are designed for exposed use? Any information yall have would certainly be very helpful. Email me personally if you want.   Thanks Josh White FUMC, Graham TX www.fumcgraham.org; FUMC organ pics: www.geocities.com/polo_gap_tommie  
(back) Subject: Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 16:08:48 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --Boundary_(ID_UNn4lot/HkT3PhxoNCqP2w) Content-type: text/plain; charset=3DISO-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 6/20/02 10:23 AM, Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > What you "want" almost demands mediocrity, since you want it ALL = regardle=3D ss of > the size of the instrument. >=3D20 Actually, I have had a versatile pipe organ, 2 manuals and pedal, no unification or borrowing, 13 ranks which served extremely well for many years in a demanding although small church (250 seats). It was able to = give a good account of itself on all the repertoire, not a specialized subset, and was not mediocre in the least. Most of the tiny specialized = one-manuals I=3DB9ve experienced have done a decidedly mediocre job at fulfilling = their mai=3D n function =3DAD providing music for the needs of worship services. >=3D20 > Many things an organ is expected to do should be done by a piano or a > keyboard. It would also be less expensive to purchase these incidental = a=3D nd > often trendy instruments as they are desired rather than purchasing an > substitute instrument which does NOTHING authentically: unsatisfactory = =3D pipe > organ sound, unsatisfactory piano sound (strangely they do reasonable > harpsichord!) and worst of all, seriously unsatisfactory modern keyboard > sounds. =3D20 >=3D20 I assume you are saying that a piano or a keyboard should be used to = provid=3D e the sounds which they do best rather than trying to make an organ, presumably electronic or pipe (after all, the toy counter started on pipe organs) generate those sounds. If so, you=3DB9re absolutely correct. = I=3DB9ve never heard any type of organ do well in this area and would always specify a separate instrument if those sounds are desired. In my church, I=3DB9ve = mounted a wonderful Kurzweil keyboard atop the organ, where it acts as an easily accessible third manual for non-organ sounds. Works beautifully in a surprising number of situations. >=3D20 > An architect once said to a committee desiring a multifunctional room = tha=3D t > "the more multifunctional a room is, the less functional it is." The = sa=3D me > applies to organs. >=3D20 As both an architect and an organist, I=3DB9m fairly familiar with the sentiment. However, my experience suggests that, at least in my = environment=3D , church music has in itself a multiplicity of needs. It is the church = organ=3DB9=3D s job to fulfill those needs as completely as possible, not sit over in one little corner babbling =3DB3I can=3DB9t do that; I=3DB9m artistic; I = can=3DB9t do that; I=3DB9m artistic...=3DB2 In short, your analogy is flawed. Multifunctional in the = sense of your analogy would be to ask the organ to be an organ (capable of = playin=3D g the full scope of organ repertoire), be a piano (lots of music is better = on a piano), be a trumpet (can=3DB9t forget those fanfare moments), be a = guitar (for praise choruses), and be capable of projecting lyrics on a screen for = =3D a congregation =3DAD that=3DB9s multifunction. All I ask, in contrast, is = that an organ be capable of doing an organ=3DB9s job. One-manual organs can=3DB9t = do that. >=3D20 > The smaller the church the less the organ needs to do and even more = impor=3D tant > that it should do ITS job well and be easy to use. >=3D20 There are surely small churches with very few requirements for the organ. The only churches of that size that I=3DB9ve experienced would be = hard-pressed to have an organ at all, of any type, so poor are their resources. But the average small church I=3DB9ve been involved with, Anglican, 150-200 seats, = have had virtually the same musical needs as larger parishes, with the = exception of volume to fill a smaller building. Liturgically, they are the same = needs=3D ; choirs have varied between parishes with little relation to parish size; appreciation for the organ literature is as easy to find in a small parish as a large. >=3D20 > A one manual tracker without pedals or pistons is far easier to use than =3D a 2m > electronic with pedals and more pistons than stops.   That=3DB9s arguably true, although much has been made in this thread of = the fac=3D t that a wonderful organist can make wonderful sounds on a high-quality if small one-manual instrument. These instruments, installed in the churches you describe, seldom get a wonderful organist (hardly ever in residence) = an=3D d therefore seldom make wonderful sounds. They are often played by pianists, often not so great pianists at that, particularly in rural areas. If = your=3DB9r=3D e installing a one-manual organ because you think you=3DB9re unlikely to = have an organist who can handle 2 manuals and pedals and 10-15 stops, you would be much better served by a piano.   Best regards, Russ Greene   --Boundary_(ID_UNn4lot/HkT3PhxoNCqP2w) Content-type: text/html; charset=3DISO-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Helvetica">On 6/20/02 10:23 AM, Cremona502@cs.com = wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">What you &quot;want&quot; almost = dema=3D nds mediocrity, since you want it ALL regardless of the size of the = instrume=3D nt. &nbsp;&nbsp;<BR> <BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">Actually, I have had a = versatile pip=3D e organ, 2 manuals and pedal, no unification or borrowing, 13 ranks which = se=3D rved extremely well for many years in a demanding although small church = (250=3D seats). It was able to give a good account of itself on all the = repertoire,=3D not a specialized subset, and was not mediocre in the least. Most of the = ti=3D ny specialized one-manuals I&#8217;ve experienced have done a decidedly = medi=3D ocre job at fulfilling their main function &#8211; providing music for the = n=3D eeds of worship services.<BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> Many things an organ is expected to do should be done by a piano or a = keybo=3D ard. &nbsp;It would also be less expensive to purchase these incidental = and =3D often trendy instruments as they are desired rather than purchasing an = subst=3D itute instrument which does NOTHING authentically: = &nbsp;&nbsp;unsatisfactor=3D y pipe organ sound, unsatisfactory piano sound (strangely they do = reasonable=3D harpsichord!) and worst of all, seriously unsatisfactory modern keyboard = so=3D unds. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<BR> <BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">I assume you are saying that a = piano=3D or a keyboard should be used to provide the sounds which they do best = rathe=3D r than trying to make an organ, presumably electronic or pipe (after all, = th=3D e toy counter started on pipe organs) generate those sounds. If so, = you&#821=3D 7;re absolutely correct. I&#8217;ve never heard any type of organ do well = in=3D this area and would always specify a separate instrument if those sounds = ar=3D e desired. In my church, I&#8217;ve mounted a wonderful Kurzweil keyboard = at=3D op the organ, where it acts as an easily accessible third manual for = non-org=3D an sounds. Works beautifully in a surprising number of situations.<BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> An architect once said to a committee desiring a multifunctional room that = =3D &quot;the more multifunctional a room is, the less functional it is.&quot; = &=3D nbsp;&nbsp;The same applies to organs. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<BR> <BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">As both an architect and an = organist=3D , I&#8217;m fairly familiar with the sentiment. However, my experience = sugge=3D sts that, at least in my environment, church music has in itself a = multiplic=3D ity of needs. It is the church organ&#8217;s job to fulfill those needs as = c=3D ompletely as possible, not sit over in one little corner babbling &#8220;I = c=3D an&#8217;t do that; I&#8217;m artistic; I can&#8217;t do that; I&#8217;m = art=3D istic...&#8221; In short, your analogy is flawed. Multifunctional in the = sen=3D se of your analogy would be to ask the organ to be an organ (capable of = play=3D ing the full scope of organ repertoire), be a piano (lots of music is = better=3D on a piano), be a trumpet (can&#8217;t forget those fanfare moments), be = a =3D guitar (for praise choruses), and be capable of projecting lyrics on a = scree=3D n for a congregation &#8211; that&#8217;s multifunction. All I ask, in = contr=3D ast, is that an organ be capable of doing an organ&#8217;s job. One-manual = o=3D rgans can&#8217;t do that.<BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> The smaller the church the less the organ needs to do and even more = importa=3D nt that it should do ITS job well and be easy to use. &nbsp;&nbsp;<BR> <BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">There are surely small churches = with=3D very few requirements for the organ. The only churches of that size that = I&=3D #8217;ve experienced would be hard-pressed to have an organ at all, of any = t=3D ype, so poor are their resources. But the average small church I&#8217;ve = be=3D en involved with, Anglican, 150-200 seats, have had virtually the same = music=3D al needs as larger parishes, with the exception of volume to fill a = smaller =3D building. Liturgically, they are the same needs; choirs have varied = between =3D parishes with little relation to parish size; appreciation for the organ = lit=3D erature is as easy to find in a small parish as a large.<BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> A one manual tracker without pedals or pistons is far easier to use than a = =3D 2m electronic with pedals and more pistons than stops.<BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> That&#8217;s arguably true, although much has been made in this thread of = t=3D he fact that a wonderful organist can make wonderful sounds on a = high-qualit=3D y if small one-manual instrument. These instruments, installed in the = church=3D es you describe, seldom get a wonderful organist (hardly ever in = residence) =3D and therefore seldom make wonderful sounds. They are often played by = pianist=3D s, often not so great pianists at that, particularly in rural areas. If = your=3D &#8217;re installing a one-manual organ because you think you&#8217;re = unlik=3D ely to have an organist who can handle 2 manuals and pedals and 10-15 = stops,=3D you would be much better served by a piano.<BR> <BR> Best regards,<BR> Russ Greene</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --Boundary_(ID_UNn4lot/HkT3PhxoNCqP2w)--  
(back) Subject: Re: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP! From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@VASSAR.EDU> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 17:20:44 -0700   > >exposed. So here is the question: What could I do about getting a = fuller, >nicer sound in the chapel, without the use of built-in speakers? Is = there a >way that I could trade the speakers that I DO have, for ones that are >designed for exposed use? >Any information yall have would certainly be very helpful. >Email me personally if you want. >   Josh, the reason for the cabinet sizes of the Allen speakers is to reproduce the lower pitches, say 150 Hz and below. however we have had a magnificent experience with a high tech subwoofer that you should be able to hide almost anywhere.   Speakers to reproduce those higher frequencies can be small and dont take up much space.   We needed a subwoofer in a pipe chamber as we had no room for 16' pipes and went electronic. While waiting for the electronic part to be built we bought our speaker sysytem. Two smallish studio monitors at $200/pair and a Carver Sunfire subwoofer at $1500.(1995 list, you need to beg)   Before you choke , this woofer is incredible. It is self powered with an internal 2,000 watt RMS amp (yes 2 KW) and is only 13 x 13 x 13 inches total! Its drivers are 10" custom units. It is very heavy.   Our first real test was when we did a fundraiser in a 1200 seat auditorium, using a Rogers Trio electronic organ. besides using externals for the upper registers, we ran the pedal through the Carver. The result was amazing the total sound easily filled the hall and the Carver literally shook the walls on the pedal notes. It likes to walk away, so it needs to be secured down.   Perhaps you could fit that in a niche or hide it under the altar. you can thus have your cake and eat it too.   John Vanderlee (no connection to Carver, just love technology when it's good)  
(back) Subject: Re: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP! From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 17:27:02 EDT   Dear Josh:   Have you ever thought of removing the back of the organ and increasing the volume of the amps. The balance is that the flute channel represented by the Hohlfloete 8' on the Gt. and the Principal 8' on the main channel need to be the same volume. I'm sure the amps are at a softer level than you need. Both main and Flute are on the bottom of the console case. the volume controls should have factory red marks on them just make them a bit louder by 1/4 turns. Cypher Middle C with a thickened 3x5 card and adjust them. The reeds will sound a bit better too as well as the mixtures.   Sometimes the volume pots just get a coating on them. Working them will make them louder too.   Good luck! You shouldn't need extra speakers in such a small room, with the acoustics you describe. Make sure both stops described above are on.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP! From: "BridgewaterUMC Director of Music" <bridgewatermusic@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 17:36:30 -0400       Josh:   I have had similar issues at churches that I have worked at. Depending = upon the era of the instrument that we are talking about, you should be able to =   increase the number of channels and speakers. I had the same issue with speakers not being allowed to be seen. We placed them on the backs and actually the reflected sound was much better than the usual in your face method. Im sure that your local Allen dealer can help you with minimal = cost or time.   Craig     _________________________________________________________________ MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos: http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx    
(back) Subject: Re: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP! From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 16:58:02 -0500   >> So here is the question: What could I do about getting a fuller, >> nicer sound in the chapel, without the use of built-in speakers? Is = there a >> way that I could trade the speakers that I DO have, for ones that are >> designed for exposed use? >> Any information yall have would certainly be very helpful.   Hi Josh, There are a number of things you can do, depending on the layout of your chapel. I'm assuming you want to use the speakers you have rather than spending money on new equipment...   1. Mount the speakers on the wall or ceiling. Paint the speaker sides in = a harmonious color. Hide the front of the speakers with a frame of appropriately-stained wood filled with grille-cloth. This can be mounted directly on the speaker or suspended in front of them.   2. Mount the speakers inconspicuously on the floor at the front of the chapel, facing up to bounce the sound off the ceiling. Some treble will be lost but you've got the built-in speakers to take up that slack and the reflected sound has a very nice quality. Paint them an inconspicuous matching color.   3. Mount the speakers in the corners of the front wall of the chapel, facing diagonally into the room. Mount a grille-cloth covered panel in = front of each, forming a triangle in the corner. Keep the speakers a few inches off the floor. This placement would give you maximum bass and, with strategic placement of the covered panels, no painting or refinishing.   Good luck, Russ    
(back) Subject: Re: The one-manual market From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 18:13:19 EDT   Philip Cooper writes in response to my post:   >Finally, these installations are not just "for my gratifications" or "for >my standards". I never suggested that they were. <<   You are quite correct, Philip, and I regret that lack of clarity in my = post caused you to draw that conclusion. I spoke in the broadest of = generalities, or at least that was my intention which obviously was not conveyed.   Your further clarification in response to my post does help me to better understand your position and what formed it. The arguments on both sides = of the equation are, at the very least, subjective and that alone will create =   differing opinions. As such we agree to disagree and perhaps that is for = the best if the disagreement can be held within civil tolerances. As to the small pipe organ outlasting us all, this is probably correct. At my age, = I don't even buy green bananas.   Best wishes, Jim Pitts    
(back) Subject: Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 10:49:41 +1200   Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)With your last comment (among others) I profoundly agree. I've often recommended that a church spend, say, $5,000 on a good reconditioned 2nd-hand piano rather than buy = a cheap electronic instrument of any kind. Sadly, no one's ever taken the advice. Electronic salesmen are often very "bad" indeed. They will get a highly-skilled musician to demonstrate their wares. The church then buys their instrument. Within a month they've discovered their little old lady, who used to play the piano a wee bit and is now therefore the official "organist" cannot make the sounds that the salesman made. Surprise, surprise! In fact the only ones actually surprised are the church people = now stuck with an awful instrument no one can get music out of. That is nasty salesmanship but is only too common. Ross , you would be much better served by a piano.   Best regards, Russ Greene    
(back) Subject: Re: Europe Organ Crawl From: <patmai@juno.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 18:38:06 -0400   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ----__JNP_000_5e71.531a.23e1 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hello, Pipechatters,   When I took my first trip out of the US in AD 1987, there was a person in Michigan who headed up the European Organ Study Tours. His name was Dirk Bakhuysen. A knowledgeable source has stated that Dirk's daughter has been leading some of the more recent tours.   On that tour it was my privilege to play briefly the large pipe organ at Passau, as well as a glorious small Silbermann orgel in Roetha, where Bach had played and Marilyn Mason has led a tour or two (and has perhaps made a recording?).. There was also an untouched one-manual orgel in Halle which Handel had played as a lad. Has anyone else on this list been on one of Dirk's or Marilyn's tours?   Pat Maimone Post Chapel III/57 Aeolian-Skinner/Moeller console/Gress-Miles West Point, NY ----__JNP_000_5e71.531a.23e1 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; = charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2600.0" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY bottomMargin=3D3D0 leftMargin=3D3D3 topMargin=3D3D0 = rightMargin=3D3D3> <DIV></DIV> <DIV> <DIV> <DIV>Hello, Pipechatters,</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; When I took my first trip out of the US in AD=3D20 1987,&nbsp; there was a person in Michigan who headed up the European = Organ=3D =3D20 Study&nbsp;Tours. &nbsp;His name was&nbsp;Dirk Bakhuysen.</DIV> <DIV>A knowledgeable source has&nbsp;stated&nbsp;that Dirk's daughter has = =3D been=3D20 leading some of the more recent tours.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp; On that tour&nbsp;it was my privilege to play = briefly&=3D nbsp;the=3D20 large pipe organ at Passau, as well as a glorious small=3D20 Silbermann&nbsp;orgel&nbsp;in Roetha, where Bach had played and Marilyn = =3D Mason=3D20 has led a tour or two (and&nbsp;has perhaps made a recording?)..&nbsp; =3D There was=3D20 also an untouched one-manual&nbsp;orgel in Halle which Handel had played = as=3D a=3D20 lad.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</DIV></DIV></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp; Has anyone else on this list been on one of Dirk's = or=3D20 Marilyn's tours?</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp; Pat Maimone</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp; Post Chapel III/57 Aeolian-Skinner/Moeller=3D20 console/Gress-Miles</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp; West Point, NY</DIV></BODY></HTML>   ----__JNP_000_5e71.531a.23e1--     ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.  
(back) Subject: RE: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP! From: "Nance, Daryel" <DNance@svdp-edu.org> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 17:46:31 -0500   John,   ...just a quick question about your use of the Carver sub wolfer... in the context of your reply I assume you were describing the Allen standard utility speakers. When you added the carver, were you feeding it with = just the plain full freq. output from the organ's line level output before = power amps., and allowing the limited freq. resp. of the sub wolfer to do its = own "crossover" filtering on the full freq. output? In other words you took = the raw output (single channel or multiple channels?) and patched it off, in parallel, to the carver at the point where the output was fed into the organ's amps.   Thanks for the info. I have an Allen 301-3B (1979) at home for practice = and the speakers do eat up space....   Peace and blessings, Daryel       Daryel Nance St.Vincent de Paul Church, Houston mailto:dnance@svdp-edu.org www.dompaulbenoit.com ; www.church-organist.com ; www.daryeln.com   "...the only ones among you who will really be happy are those who sought and found how to serve." Albert Schwietzer         -----Original Message----- From: John Vanderlee [mailto:jovanderlee@VASSAR.EDU] Sent: Thursday, June 20, 2002 7:21 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP!     > >exposed. So here is the question: What could I do about getting a = fuller, >nicer sound in the chapel, without the use of built-in speakers? Is = there a >way that I could trade the speakers that I DO have, for ones that are >designed for exposed use? >Any information yall have would certainly be very helpful. >Email me personally if you want. >   Josh, the reason for the cabinet sizes of the Allen speakers is to reproduce the lower pitches, say 150 Hz and below. however we have had a magnificent experience with a high tech subwoofer that you should be able to hide almost anywhere.   Speakers to reproduce those higher frequencies can be small and dont take up much space.   We needed a subwoofer in a pipe chamber as we had no room for 16' pipes and went electronic. While waiting for the electronic part to be built we bought our speaker sysytem. Two smallish studio monitors at $200/pair and a Carver Sunfire subwoofer at $1500.(1995 list, you need to beg)   Before you choke , this woofer is incredible. It is self powered with an internal 2,000 watt RMS amp (yes 2 KW) and is only 13 x 13 x 13 inches total! Its drivers are 10" custom units. It is very heavy.   Our first real test was when we did a fundraiser in a 1200 seat auditorium, using a Rogers Trio electronic organ. besides using externals for the upper registers, we ran the pedal through the Carver. The result was amazing the total sound easily filled the hall and the Carver literally shook the walls on the pedal notes. It likes to walk away, so it needs to be secured down.   Perhaps you could fit that in a niche or hide it under the altar. you can thus have your cake and eat it too.   John Vanderlee (no connection to Carver, just love technology when it's good)   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Email addresss for Ross Wards. From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 17:09:50 -0700 (PDT)   Ross Wards' e-mail address is: <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>.     --- Sand Lawn <glawn@jam.rr.com> wrote: > Ross, > > Please send me your email address. Would like to be > able to send you a > message privately. > > Sand Lawn > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! - Official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cup http://fifaworldcup.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Mollers From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2002 20:45:47 -0400   And, of course, the Conversatory at Shenandoah U. in Winchester VA has = one.   Karl E. Moyer   > From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Wed, 19 Jun 2002 12:04:00 -0500 > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: Mollers > >> Somewhere in Alabama is a rare (recent!) Moller tracker; at a Baptist >> church, I believe. > > You may confusing that with the Moller Tracker at Northminster > Baptist Church in Monroe, LA. - http://www.northmin.com/music.html > Scroll down the page for the Organ information. > > David > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >