PipeChat Digest #2929 - Friday, June 21, 2002
 
Re: Is it pipes vs.digital....not really.
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Gress-Miles recording
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
SMALL ORGANS: DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED ... I'm not going to let this one 
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Pedalboard compass, hard to find music
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
RE: Gress-Miles recording
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Pedalboard compass
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Individual Pipe Blowers!
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
One Manuals and Small Churches
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
One Manuals
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: SMALL ORGANS: DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED ... I'm not going to l	et this
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
Re: Gress-Miles recording
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Re: Pedalboard compass
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Solution to getting the new organ [was: small rooms, organs, and speakers
  by "M Collins" <mcoll@panix.com>
Re: Gress-Miles recording
  by "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
RE: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP!
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@VASSAR.EDU>
RE: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP!
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
Re: Pedalboard compass
  by "Audrey Jacobsen" <AJ1995@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Is it pipes vs.digital....not really. From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 11:50:33 -0400   Dear List,   Richard raises some very important points. The propagation of the species IS a responsibility. I grew up in a church where No ONE was allowed to touch the organ. Had that policy been different, I believe that I would BE an organist today.   When will organists learn that the playing of an instrument doesn't damage it ? IF every organist on this list actively sought the youth of their church and allowed them to use the instrument, how many new organists would that generate?   We recently successfully fought for a new instrument for our church, and frankly, one of the arguments was : "That without a good instrument - we will not be able to attract a competent organist.   As a matter of simple fact, with similar compensation packages, How many organists would prefer a large 3 manual electronic over a relatively new (or recently restored) nicely sized pipe organ? (Out church is getting a new instrument of 40 ranks).     Now, the price question certainly came up ! The cost of the pipe organ was approximately FIVE TIMES that of the "full" electronic". However, an electronic instrument would be classified as "Durable goods" (Having a usable life span exceeding three years). This is not to imply that the electronic won't last considerably longer, but that is the classification that it falls in. A Pipe Organ, on the other hand, would be considered a "Capital Improvement", acknowledging it much long life span.   Most of the major denominations have a intra-denominational loan/mortgage program which would allow almost any congregation to borrow money (at low interest rates) to purchase a reasonable pipe organ for their congregation.   The difference is that Pipe Organs are easily mortgage-able and electronics are most likely to fall within the scope of "budget items".   IF you, as an organist, make this difference clear to the church board ( and the members of the board that are the "number crunchers") the possibility of actually getting a pipe organ is much improved.   It is not unrealistic to spend $1,000 (US) PER MEMBER on a pipe organ. This most certainly takes this purchase "off budget" and puts it into a "Capital Project".   Let's look at a practical situation: A Church of 100 members. A CAPITAL budget of $100,000. Current funds available $15,000.   There is currently a fine instrument (2 manuals and pedal) of 15 ranks available at Organclearing house. Cost $10,000   IT is reasonable to expect that this instrument could be purchased, moved, reinstalled and re-voiced for substantially LESS than $100,000, but let's assume that it would cost this much.   Mortgage w/ the denomination for $85,000 at 3% interest for 15 years.   This would result in an "assessment" of less than $7.00 per month per member !   With a well organized capital campaign, a much larger "down payment" is possible as well a lower total cost which would reduce this amount even further, as would any larger donations/memorials.   I'm not saying that this formula would work in EVERY situation, but I think it would work in MOST situations.       Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY             On Fri, 21 Jun 2002 08:36:04 -0500 Richard Jordan <mail@gesangbuch.org> writes: > At 11:19 PM 6/20/02 -0700, you wrote: > >To me, the larger and more important issue is fighting for more > organ > >MUSIC in churches (where frequently it is disappearing), NOT > whether an > >organ was built by Moller or Allen. > > that is a good question, > how do you get more organ music? > does it perhaps involve training more organists? > how many churches are regularly training new organists? > how many have scholarships to assist with lessons? > I think the solution begins at the grass roots level. > I am afraid if we don't get busy, > the disappearence of organists will lead to even fewer organs > and even less organ music. > > > > > Regards, > Richard Jordan > > http://www.Lutheran-Hymnal.com > http://www.OnJordansBanks.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >   ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.  
(back) Subject: Re: Gress-Miles recording From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 11:16:24 -0500   I was rather awed at the time the record originally came out that a rich NY suburban church would spend so much = money "upgrading" and enlarging whatever was there just a few years before = it--an Aeolian-Skinner, perhaps? That's what I recall after all these years ... that this was a rebuild of something already there that wasn't all that = old.   Also: was this the RCA LP that had "The Power of the Organ" emblazoned on its front cover (to go along with an orchestral one that read "The Power of the Orchestra)? I may have to try = to find that old record jacket.   Bob Lind         Ross & Lynda Wards <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> 06/19/2002 08:14 PM Please respond to PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> To: PipeChat@pipechat.org@SMTP@cchntmsd cc: Subject: Gress-Miles     Just yesterday I spent a whopping and outrageous one dollar in a 1963 lp recording of Robert Owen playing big works on the Gress-Miles organ in Christ Church, Bronxville, New York. The organ is a 3-manual & Pedal of five divisions and 68rks, 3877 pipes (that's how the record jacket describes it and then gives the specification).      
(back) Subject: SMALL ORGANS: DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED ... I'm not going to let this one go, folks (grin) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 09:32:35 -0700   Heavens!   My current physical condition has nothing to do with the matter at hand .... except for the occasional recital before Evensong or Vespers, I've NEVER found a use for MOST of the large organ pieces I learned in conservatory, except for Clavieruebung III, and individual movements of things. An organist/choirmaster in an RC or Anglican church with multiple Masses and the responsibility of one or more choirs simply doesn't have the TIME to play them on Sunday morning.   Let me see if I can remember the order of service in my mother's church .... it went something like this:   ORGAN PRELUDE - five minutes max; the organist was rehearsing the choir in the fellowship hall before that CALL TO WORSHIP - The Lord Is In His Holy Temple - from the back of the 1939 Methodist Hymnal OPENING HYMN PASTORAL PRAYER PRAYER RESPONSE - Hear Our Prayer, O Lord - as above RESPONSIVE READING GLORIA PATRI - the "Methodist" one in A Major ANTHEM RECEPTION OF TITHES AND OFFERINGS - during which a short organ piece was played DOXOLOGY SERMON INVITATION TO CHRISTIAN DISCIPLESHIP BENEDICTION CHORAL AMEN - "Dresden" three-fold CLOSING HYMN ORGAN POSTLUDE   This was the service that Miss Addy played on that 7-stop Estey for close to half a century. I can TELL you her registrations, because I sat beside her as a small child.       PRELUDE - whatever ... the Sw. Stopped Diap. against the Gt. Dulciana made a LOVELY solo stop ... so did the Sw. Salicional, or the 4' Harmonic Flute down an octave ... those were the three Sw. stops. She never discovered that the Gt. 4' Octave sounded like a 'cello if it was played down an octave, but I did (grin).   CALL TO WORSHIP - Sw. Salicional coupled at 8-4 to Gt. Dulciana   HYMNS - Sw. Stopped Diap. and 4' Harmonic Flute coupled at 8-4 to Gt. Open Diap and Octave   GLORIA PATRI - same   PRAYER RESPONSE - same as CALL TO WORSHIP   ANTHEM - whatever ... usually Full Sw. coupled to Gt. at 8-4 with no stops drawn, or just the Dulciana ... that gave her two volume levels -- soft for soloists, mezzo-forte for full choir.   DOXOLOGY - same as GLORIA PATRI and HYMNS   CHORAL AMEN - same as CALL TO WORSHIP and PRAYER RESPONSE   POSTLUDE - full organ, coupled       The service music NEVER changed; AFAIK, it hasn't to this DAY (grin), though the HYMNAL has. The choir was about the same size as mine at St. Matthew's -- 5-4-2-3; the church seated a few less (100); it was a smaller room, and the acoustics weren't quite as good.   Had I been around when they built the new church, I would have advised them to enlarge the Estey and put electric pull-downs on the slider chests to replace the failing tubular pneumatic action ... or at least to re-use the pipework; but I wasn't. Instead, they bought a 4-rank unit organ from the "Florida" Skinner people, a twin of the one recently removed from the (Episcopal) Chapel of the Resurrection at Ruge Hall (Florida State University, Tallahassee).   I rejoice that Bob Lind has a large music program in a prominent urban church; Miss Addy didn't; I don't either, though the CHORAL side is probably better than MOST liturgical churches of similar size THESE days (chuckle).   But we're not talking about organs for large, important programs in big urban churches, are we?   I will ALSO rejoice if another professional musician follows me at St. Matthew's when I die or retire ... it SHOULD happen ... SoCal is a desirable (albeit EXPENSIVE) area of the country; the salary is adequate; the room is good; the choir is good; there will be a good pipe organ. BUT ... it could just as well NOT happen ... organists trained in our liturgy are few and far between ... most are around my age, or older. But in ANY case, he/she will have a pipe organ to play (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedalboard compass, hard to find music From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 19:51:44 +0300   I think "Le Banquet Celeste" goes up to top F sharp - though I have = mislaid my copy so I'm not certain. Several pieces sprung to mind - but when I checked none of them do use the top two notes of a 32 note pedal board. = All the same, I like to have one - probably because the organ I first learnt = on did! It seems to give a sense of balance. Re hard to find music - I have recommended Access Music direct dennis@pontst.demon.co.uk before - I actually got Incantation through = Dennis a few months back. He ships worldwide, prices are reasonable and service excellent. He specialises in hard to get music, and if it is published he will find it. John Foss  
(back) Subject: RE: Gress-Miles recording From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 11:51:07 -0500   Bob:   I wondered the same thing. Of course my home church in Ithaca, NY, = replaced its 1924 E.M. Skinner with a Gress-Miles in 1968 (it lives on in glory in Bellingham, WA), so there's no accounting for some tastes. I think the recording I have of Owen at Christ Church was made on the very nice A-S; = it has a large b/w photo of the facade on the cover; don't recall the label, though.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Robert Lind [mailto:Robert_Lind@cch.com] Sent: Friday, June 21, 2002 11:16 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Gress-Miles recording     I was rather awed at the time the record originally came out that a rich NY suburban church would spend so much = money "upgrading" and enlarging whatever was there just a few years before = it--an Aeolian-Skinner, perhaps? That's what I recall after all these years ... that this was a rebuild of something already there that wasn't all that = old.   Also: was this the RCA LP that had "The Power of the Organ" emblazoned on its front cover (to go along with an orchestral one that read "The Power of the Orchestra)? I may have to try = to find that old record jacket.   Bob Lind         Ross & Lynda Wards <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> 06/19/2002 08:14 PM Please respond to PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> To: PipeChat@pipechat.org@SMTP@cchntmsd cc: Subject: Gress-Miles     Just yesterday I spent a whopping and outrageous one dollar in a 1963 lp recording of Robert Owen playing big works on the Gress-Miles organ in Christ Church, Bronxville, New York. The organ is a 3-manual & Pedal of five divisions and 68rks, 3877 pipes (that's how the record jacket describes it and then gives the specification).       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Pedalboard compass From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 12:56:34 -0400   Just a quick answer: Variations de Concert by Joseph Bonnet, = including that marvelous pedal cadenza with the four-note chords high in the pedalboard.   Nor could I accompany Mendelssohn's _Elijah_ as I'd prefer without = high G in the pedal board. If the organ is to be useful for service-playing = and canthem and oratorio accompaniment, a full-compas (32-note) pedal board is of great value.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   > From: pat and ian <patian@senet.com.au> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 17:06:46 +0930 > To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Cc: <Theatreorgans-L@theatreorgans.com> > Subject: Pedalboard compass > > > What published, or other, organ compositions require the top F# and the = G on > a 32-note pedalboard? > > If there aren't any, why do we need 32 notes on the pedalboard? > > Ian. > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Individual Pipe Blowers! From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 12:20:24 -0500   Jim--sounds like a wonderful idea to me. And I don't see why they couldn't put an Octave 4' in the other side of the mouth. Equip the youth group with a 3-rank Mixture (three small pipes per mouth), and you've got a principal chorus! And every church has a windbag or two that can puff on an old large-scale 16' bourdon!   Dennis Steckley   Ich liebe meine Katzen   -----Original Message-----     Quite honestly, there are members that would prefer pipes over digital eve if they had to lay 61 parishioners on the floor with an 8' prinzipal in their mouths and tap them on the toe with they wanted them to blow, rather than play a digital, However, I with also state that if you want a trumpet en chamade you must stand them up .   Me, I like'em both.   Jim H.     -----      
(back) Subject: One Manuals and Small Churches From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 12:23:01 -0500   Absoposilutely, Bud!   Dennis Steckley Who has been both organist and preacher in small churches (sometimes at the same time!)   Ich liebe meine Katzen   -----Original Message-----     Subject: one-manual organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 07:23:57 -0700     I simply don't GET the idea that volunteers and amateurs would be better served by a large(r) substitute than they would be by a small version of the real thing. If you simply MUST have two manuals, there are some small two-manual organs available as well. I'm not stuck on the one-manual organ as the be-all and end-all alternative to digital, IF you have the height and depth for a two-manual pipe organ. For that matter, there are also small electro-pneumatic pipe organs (Artistes, etc.) that are more amenable to being re-configured to fit different spaces.   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: One Manuals From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 12:26:19 -0500   Well, to each his/her own, Bob. I'm glad you have the opportunity to play an organ you enjoy and that meets your needs.   But I'll still side with Bud on this issue given the budget and the settings. A fine one manual has far more beauty AND variety of tone than most of the electronics these small churches are likely to get--for no more money!   Dennis Steckley   Ich liebe meine Katzen   -----Original Message----- From the moment I became thrilled with the pipe organ as a little kid to the day I began lessons, I wanted color, variety, versatility. I want to improvise, I want to play literature from (almost) all periods, and I want to be excited by sounds that will keep me going day after day to search for more great organ works, to learn them, and to play them to the glory of God.   A limited, one-manual organ simply will not do it for me. I would far rather play a fine piano any day. A good piano is a great companion for any serious musician ... and I suppose a one-manual organ will do for limited practicing or for home use.   Please forgive the rant.   Bob Lind Good Shepherd Church Naperville, IL            
(back) Subject: Re: SMALL ORGANS: DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED ... I'm not going to l et this one go, folks (grin) From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 12:28:21 -0500   Bud, you keep harping and talking about the same stuff all the time! I find it all entirely too limiting, unappealing, and defeating to those who want to get onward and upward. And I simply am tired of all the people here who just know what's demeaningly right in a rural setting or in a smallish setting or for an uninformed bunch of troglodytes. Poor country bumpkins. Poor cretins. They can't expect to = know what to do with anything beyond a primitive, grayish existence. Let's = think "little" because they have little minds and no experience, liking, or knowledge of what's out there in the real world. It's akin to people in a ghetto. They simply can't get beyond what they were born into, poor souls, so why should anyone offer them any opportunity to grow. I was born right = in the middle of Kansas, and guess I should be mighty grateful that we moved = to California when I was four years old. (My mother liked to tell me that I = was musical because she went to a performance of "Messiah" in Lindsborg, = Kansas, just a few days before she went into labor.)   Have you ever realized how many good instruments there are in Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Kentucky, Tennessee = today? Take a good look. These areas of the country maybe could have been called cultural deserts 40 years ago, but things have changed. Now the entire USA is a cultural desert (not so funny), so the playing field is a lot more level.   As to what we studied in college/conservatory/whatever, this had precious little to do with what = most of us played weekly in church. It is common knowledge across the land that we were not properly trained for what we were to become. Is it not ever thus? That's certainly one reason, after 3 years, that I changed my major = to composition and later music theory. I had to scout up my material, and pretty soon I knew more "practical" repertory than my teachers (save one--Benjamin Hadley).   I don't give half a hoot what Miss Addy played and how she played it. Ditto all the people I heard as a child. = Most of them were pretty bad, but somehow they kindled a spark within me.   Perhaps we're apple-ing and orange-ing here, so I'll be Pontius Pilating this discussion. My point is don't put people = in straitjackets; and cool the smug, omniscient I-know-what's-right-for-them jazz. You've experienced life one way but don't force it on others. I'm merely trying to tell any gullible folks who may be out there that yours = is but one way to look at a very big subject, which I'm happy to continue discussing off the list.   RJL             quilisma@socal.rr.com 06/21/2002 11:32 AM Please respond to PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org>@SMTP@cchntmsd cc: Subject: SMALL ORGANS: DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED ... I'm not going to let this one go, folks (grin)     <<<Heavens!   My current physical condition has nothing to do with the matter at hand ... except for the occasional recital before Evensong or Vespers, I've NEVER found a use for MOST of the large organ pieces I learned in conservatory, >>>     <<<Let me see if I can remember the order of service in my mother's church ... it went something like this:>>>     Spare us, O Lord!     <<<This was the service that Miss Addy played on that 7-stop Estey for close to half a century. I can TELL you her registrations, because I sat beside her as a small child.>>>     So what? Who cares?          
(back) Subject: Re: Gress-Miles recording From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 13:31:47 -0400       Robert Lind wrote: > > > > Also: was this the RCA LP that had "The > Power of the Organ" emblazoned on its front cover (to go along with an > orchestral one that read "The Power of the Orchestra)? I may have to try = to > find that old record jacket. > Yes, that is the album. I got it new when it was released for about $3 at The Record Hunter in NYC in the 1960s. "The Power of the Orchestra" album had a unique arrangement of "Night on Bald Mountain" which had some windstorm sound effects added. I believe that an organ pedal point was added also. I no longer have my copy of that album but still have the Owen recording.   Stan Lowkis    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedalboard compass From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 20:33:10 +0300   Sorry Karl - no! The Bonnet came to my mind - I played it in a concert = last week - but it doesn't go abve F natural! I have the copy in front of me. John Foss ----- Original Message ----- From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, June 21, 2002 7:56 PM Subject: Re: Pedalboard compass  
(back) Subject: Solution to getting the new organ [was: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP! ] From: "M Collins" <mcoll@panix.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 13:52:07 -0400 (EDT)     I have no malice toward the writer, but couldn't resist:   On Thu, 20 Jun 2002 Pologaptommy@aol.com wrote: > Now, I would DIE to have a nice small pipe organ in the chapel,...   And then later wrote: > So here is the question: What could I do about getting a fuller, > nicer sound in the chapel...   Sounds like you've answered your own question. Make sure your life insurance is paid up, with the church organ fund as the beneficiary, and go fall under a crosstown bus.   How much are we willing to put on the line for that organ we so desparately think our church needs?   --- MJC [what if they said they'd buy a new organ, but you would be out of a job?]        
(back) Subject: Re: Gress-Miles recording From: "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 14:10:09 -0400   If I remember correctly, Owen did a recording on that organ for Aeolian-Skinner, (their label) as I have it somewhere in my collection.   Anyone out there have a complete list of Aeolian-Skinner Records? Would love to know how many there were.   Cheers, Mack   "Storandt, Peter" wrote: > > I think the > recording I have of Owen at Christ Church was made on the very nice A-S; = it > has a large b/w photo of the facade on the cover; don't recall the = label, > though. > > Peter > >  
(back) Subject: RE: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP! From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@VASSAR.EDU> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 14:06:18 -0700   >John, > >..just a quick question about your use of the Carver sub wolfer... in the >context of your reply I assume you were describing the Allen standard >utility speakers. When you added the carver, were you feeding it with = just >the plain full freq. output from the organ's line level output before = power >amps., and allowing the limited freq. resp. of the sub wolfer to do its = own >"crossover" filtering on the full freq. output? In other words you took = the >raw output (single channel or multiple channels?) and patched it off, in >parallel, to the carver at the point where the output was fed into the >organ's amps.   Adding the Carver takes basically care of everything. It has a built in crossover network that channels only the lows out to the subwoofer and the balance to the satelite speakers.   John V  
(back) Subject: RE: small rooms, organs, and speakers-HELP! From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 14:20:42 -0400   At 02:06 PM 6/21/2002 -0700, you wrote: >>John, >> >>..just a quick question about your use of the Carver sub wolfer... in = the >>context of your reply I assume you were describing the Allen standard >>utility speakers. When you added the carver, were you feeding it with = just >>the plain full freq. output from the organ's line level output before = power >>amps., and allowing the limited freq. resp. of the sub wolfer to do its = own >>"crossover" filtering on the full freq. output? In other words you took = the >>raw output (single channel or multiple channels?) and patched it off, in >>parallel, to the carver at the point where the output was fed into the >>organ's amps. > >Adding the Carver takes basically care of everything. It has a built in >crossover network that channels only the lows out to the subwoofer and = the >balance to the satelite speakers. > >John V   Hi,   There are other good powered sub-woofers out there, especially if you are not trying to do a 32' Contra Bourdon. The one we use is made by Earthquake in California. This thing when it going starts hoping around = so it does need to be secured. I think these folk have several models. We use the biggest of them.   Arie V.    
(back) Subject: Re: Pedalboard compass From: "Audrey Jacobsen" <AJ1995@cox.net> Date: Fri, 21 Jun 2002 11:34:15 -0700   Larry King's brilliant organ work "Fanfares to the Tongues of Fire" begins with a pedal solo. The first five notes are from the "Veni creator spiritus" Gregorian chant. The second pedal note is F# at the top of the pedalboard.   Audrey Jacobsen   ----- Original Message ----- From: "pat and ian" <patian@senet.com.au> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Cc: <Theatreorgans-L@theatreorgans.com> Sent: Friday, June 21, 2002 12:36 AM Subject: Pedalboard compass     > > What published, or other, organ compositions require the top F# and the = G on > a 32-note pedalboard? > > If there aren't any, why do we need 32 notes on the pedalboard? > > Ian. > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >