PipeChat Digest #2931 - Sunday, June 23, 2002
 
Organist Recruiting
  by "Nick Grbac" <NickGTV@webtv.net>
Re: Digital creativity
  by "r" <basset3@citlink.net>
Recital on a Moeller in Warwick, NY  June 23
  by <patmai@juno.com>
NYTimes.com Article: Another Jewel in New York's Crown of Organs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Pedalboard compass & BACH
  by "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl>
RE: Pedalboard compass & BACH
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: Harmonic Mixers
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Morton Belcher, please contact me
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Pedalboard compass
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: NYTimes.com Article: Another Jewel in New York's Crown of Organs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: Organist Recruiting From: "Nick Grbac" <NickGTV@webtv.net> Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2002 02:48:30 -0700 (PDT)   The recent post on organist recruiting got me to thinking about p-chat listers compiling a list of unique ways to attract new people to the organ.   Someone mentioned a Children's Mass where organ students get a chance to play an element (hymn, prelude, etc.). Surely there are other creative things being done across the country that could be implemented.   While what I'm about to say is almost as sensitive as pipes vs. digital (or one manual vs. two), it appears the presence of organs is diminishing in many venues, many organ fans are leaving this earth, fewer students are majoring in organ performance, fewer churches are using organs (pipe or electronics), there are even fewer pizza parlors with TO's in them. Ditto for home organs.   What's worked in your area??????   NickGTV    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital creativity From: "r" <basset3@citlink.net> Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2002 08:07:19 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0017_01C219C3.D4868CE0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Here's a funny one I just heard at a social gathering of church =3D musicians. An RC organist reports that "diocesan resources" issues a =3D 3-ring binder containing the music for the season to be followed in each = =3D parish. Their cantor/choir director looked over the newly issued =3D version, saw "A Mighty Fortress," and had to be revived with smelling =3D salts. "Reformation indeed! We'll have none of that nonsense here." =3D But we all had a good sense of humor about it.   Robert     ------=3D_NextPart_000_0017_01C219C3.D4868CE0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4207.2601" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Here's a funny one I just heard at a = =3D social=3D20 gathering of church musicians.&nbsp; An RC organist reports that =3D "diocesan=3D20 resources" issues a 3-ring binder containing the music for the season to = =3D be=3D20 followed in each parish.&nbsp; Their cantor/choir director looked over =3D the newly=3D20 issued version, saw "A Mighty Fortress," and had to be revived with =3D smelling=3D20 salts.&nbsp; "Reformation indeed!&nbsp; We'll have none of that nonsense = =3D   here."&nbsp; But we all had a good sense of humor about it.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Robert</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0017_01C219C3.D4868CE0--    
(back) Subject: Recital on a Moeller in Warwick, NY June 23 From: <patmai@juno.com> Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2002 08:58:26 -0400   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ----__JNP_000_4d67.0952.44a2 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Greetings, Pipechatters,   Sunday, June 23 at 4 PM Kathlene Tenckinck, one of my former students, will give a recital at the Warwick Reformed Church, Warwick, New York. Everyone is invited to attend this free recital. The concert will feature works that were included on her April senior recital at Drake University, Iowa. She just e-mailed me the following titles and composers, perhaps not in program order. She works almost full time at the camp (Warwick Conference Center) when she is at home.   Symphony #1, Final...Louis Vierne   Fantasia in G minor...J.S.Bach   Cortege and Litanie....Dupre   Plein Jeu and Caprice from Suite de ton....Clerambault   Le jardin suspendu...Alain   The organ is a 3-manual Moeller. I hope that it has been serviced and tuned recently.   Although it will probably be awfully hot inside as well as outside, I am truly looking forward to hearing Kathlene play her Senior Recital at her home church. No, I do not know which Clerambault Suite she will be playing.   Cheers to all from the rather warm Hudson Valley,   Pat Maimone Post Chapel (air-conditioned) West Point, NY III/57 Aeolian-Skinner/Moeller console/Gress-Miles ----__JNP_000_4d67.0952.44a2 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; = charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2600.0" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV> <DIV>Greetings, Pipechatters,</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Sunday, June 23 at 4 PM = =3D Kathlene=3D20 Tenckinck, one of my former students, will give a recital at the = Warwick=3D20 Reformed Church, Warwick, New York.&nbsp;&nbsp; Everyone is invited to =3D attend=3D20 this free recital.&nbsp; The concert will feature works that were included = =3D on=3D20 her April senior recital at Drake University,=3D20 Iowa.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; She just e-mailed me = the=3D20 following titles and composers,&nbsp;perhaps&nbsp;not in program = order.&=3D nbsp;=3D20 She works almost full time at the camp (Warwick Conference Center) when = she=3D is=3D20 at home.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Symphony #1, Final...Louis Vierne</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Fantasia in G minor...J.S.Bach</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Cortege and Litanie....Dupre</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Plein Jeu and Caprice from Suite de ton....Clerambault</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Le jardin suspendu...Alain</DIV></DIV> <DIV><BR clear=3D3Dall>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The organ is a = 3-manual=3D =3D20 Moeller.&nbsp; I hope that it has been serviced and tuned recently.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Although it will probably = =3D be=3D20 awfully hot inside as well as outside, I am truly looking forward to =3D hearing=3D20 Kathlene play her Senior Recital at her home church.&nbsp; No, I do not = =3D know=3D20 which Clerambault Suite she will be playing.&nbsp; </DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Cheers to all from the rather warm =3D Hudson=3D20 Valley,</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Pat Maimone</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Post Chapel (air-conditioned)</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; West Point, NY</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; III/57 = Aeolian-Skinner/Moeller=3D20 console/Gress-Miles </DIV></BODY></HTML>   ----__JNP_000_4d67.0952.44a2--    
(back) Subject: NYTimes.com Article: Another Jewel in New York's Crown of Organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2002 10:15:37 -0400 (EDT)   This article from NYTimes.com has been sent to you by quilisma@socal.rr.com.     This from today's NY Times ...   Cheers,   Bud   quilisma@socal.rr.com   /-------------------- advertisement -----------------------\     Explore more of Starbucks at Starbucks.com. http://www.starbucks.com/default.asp?ci=3D1015   \----------------------------------------------------------/     Another Jewel in New York's Crown of Organs   June 22, 2002 By CRAIG R. WHITNEY           Neither of New York City's biggest concert halls, Avery Fisher Hall or Carnegie Hall, has a symphonic pipe organ, but its churches keep building them.   The latest is the Roman Catholic Church of St. Vincent Ferrer on the Upper East Side, where a huge truck recently brought nearly 4,000 pipes from the Schantz Organ Company in Orrville, Ohio, for a new organ in the gallery.   Jeffrey D. Dexter, Schantz's tonal director, has been up there tweedling and thunking ever since, "voicing" the pipes to make them speak musically the way he and Dr. Mark Bani, the organist at St. Vincent, designed the instrument to sound.   "This organ will play Bach, all the rest of the organ literature and transcriptions of orchestral music," Dr. Bani said. "We wanted an organ that could render all types of music well."   Mr. Dexter, who is also an organist, says the new organ's tonal colors are as broad as an orchestra's. It has 86 sets of pipes, including an ophicleide, whose 44 wooden pipes range up to 32 feet in length and imitate the sound of a 19th-century relative of the tuba. The organ even includes a harp, and a whole positiv section, named for the small organ with bright, clear sounds for which Baroque composers wrote.   "It's not a box of eight crayons, it's a box of 64, with the sharpener," Mr. Dexter said. "One of the things that alienated people from the organ for the better part of two or three generations was that we've been our own worst enemies, programming music that people didn't go home humming. This is an organ capable of rendering that kind of music."   The musical concept of the organ at St. Vincent Ferrer (869 Lexington Avenue, at 66th Street) recalls the eclectic American Classic instruments - able to perform all kinds of music, from Baroque to post-Romantic - that were produced by the Aeolian-Skinner Organ Company of Boston and other manufacturers from the 1930's to the 1950's.   In New York City, these instruments went into such places as the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Riverside Church and even Philharmonic Hall, which tossed its organ out in an acoustical renovation when it became Avery Fisher Hall.   Then, for a few decades, organ builders focused on producing instruments that reproduced the sounds and mechanical systems of the organs of Bach's day, sometimes right down to their uneven-temperament tuning.   Now the pendulum is swinging back again, with eclectic instruments like the French Romantic organ completed in 1993 by Mander Organs of London in the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola on Park Avenue and the English-style organ, about the size of St. Vincent Ferrer's, that was installed last summer by Austin Organs in Grace Church in Brooklyn Heights.   Even the 29-voice pipe organ by Johannes Klais Orgelbau of Bonn that went into Irvington Presbyterian Church in Irvington-on-Hudson last year is eclectic enough to play music from all periods, said Dr. F. Anthony Thurman, the music director there.   The new Schantz organ in St. Vincent Ferrer cost about $1 million, said Dr. Bani (pronounced BAY-nee).   "Father Ramsey said don't spare any cost - we want the best organ," Dr. Bani said of St. Vincent's previous pastor, the Rev. Boniface Ramsey, who like his successor, the Rev. Kevin Robb, is a Dominican priest.   A Ramsey trumpet, the stop that is the organ's crowning glory, can be heard after Mr. Dexter finishes the organ this month and will sound at a special dedication concert that Dr. Bani is to play on Oct. 20.   The organ was paid for with two gifts, from the late William E. Simon and from an anonymous donor, Dr. Bani said.   "We struggled with the design of the case," he said, pointing out how the new organ sits in front of the Medieval-style lancet stained-glass windows in the church's west front. Schantz craftsmen distributed the longest pipes in two carved wooden cases on either side of the windows and let the bright tin and spotted metal pipes of its German Baroque section stand free beneath the shimmering deep blue and red windows.   The new organ in the gallery is played from the chancel at the opposite end of the church, on a console that also controls a separate organ there, built earlier by Schantz. "It enables us to do some lovely antiphonal effects," Dr. Bani said, "and the distribution of pipes makes possible a stereo sound that embraces the listener."   The Schantz company's magnum opus in the New York area is the 154-voice instrument it built for the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark in 1954. The company, founded by a Swiss immigrant named A. J. Tschantz in 1873, restored the 6,000-pipe organ Ernest M. Skinner built in 1931 for Severance Hall, home of the Cleveland Orchestra, in 2000 after the hall was renovated. This enabled the orchestra to play works for organ and orchestra it had been unable to perform for a quarter-century. "The last time it had played before we restored it was 1976," Mr. Dexter said.   The Skinner organ in Cleveland and other pipe organs in concert halls in Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco and Seattle are considered essential there, but in New York City only Alice Tully Hall has a pipe organ, the work of the Swiss builder Kuhn.   The St. Vincent Ferrer organ will serve both the Mass and a mass audience, Dr. Bani hopes. "If you're going to play for the common listener," he said, "you want to have all composers represented in a concert, with maybe an orchestral transcription, so that people will go away wanting to hear more. Then the organ can be restored to its place as the king of instruments."   http://www.nytimes.com/2002/06/22/arts/music/22ORGA.html?ex=3D1025755337&ei= =3D1&en=3D25a245b0ae54a45f       HOW TO ADVERTISE --------------------------------- For information on advertising in e-mail newsletters or other creative advertising opportunities with The New York Times on the Web, please contact onlinesales@nytimes.com or visit our online media kit at http://www.nytimes.com/adinfo   For general information about NYTimes.com, write to help@nytimes.com.   Copyright 2002 The New York Times Company  
(back) Subject: RE: Pedalboard compass & BACH From: "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl> Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2002 17:46:26 +0200 (CEST)       The only piece by Bach that requires f in the pedal is Toccata F major. This work is probably connected with the organ in Wiessenfells - the only instrument with f in the pedal in this area.   Marek Miskowicz Cracow, Poland   On Fri, 21 Jun 2002, COLASACCO, ROBERT wrote:   > I remember being told a very long time ago just prior to my first organ > lesson that Bach's music only went up to d which is not true, as we all > know. I assume that possibly before Bach and his contemporaries that = pedal > boards might have only gone that far and that's what the person who told = me > this meant..- RBC > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: RE: Pedalboard compass & BACH From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2002 13:36:03 -0400   ---- Original message ---- > >The only piece by Bach that requires f in the pedal is >Toccata F major. This work is probably connected with the organ in >Wiessenfells - the only instrument with f in the pedal in this area. > I thought there was another one somewhere im Orgelbuechlein.   Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: Harmonic Mixers From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2002 18:15:14 -0400   Dear Friendly Listers,   >> "Why do we refers to "harmonic mixtures" as such? Since they are = intended to reinforce the upper register -- and thus the melodic line -- wouldn't it make more sense to call them "melodic mixtures?" "   > I have no idea. But we don't. And I am not sure that they quite do > that very well, either.   Ken, who should know -- :-) -- and gives a good teacher's answer.   I've appreciated various persons' explanations of such mixture = inforcing the overtones of the (likely) 8' pitch, though it's interesting to see = that most of them start at the 15th in pitch. What's more, by the time on = gets to the upper octave, NO ONE is building mixtures with the 17, 19, 21 or 22 pitches in the mixture!   So let's try again, perhaps in several regards:   1. Can someone with "expert knowledge" print out sample compositions of such mixtures to let us see how they are, in fact designed? (I'd assume that in the top octave, we'd be seeing chiefly 1 - 8 - 12 - 15 pitches.)   2. What's been said about reinforcing overtones of the (perhaps usually) = 8' line is often, if not usually, true of mixtures not labeled "Harmonic mixtures;" yet, at least sometimes they are intended to help the "inner voices" of the musical texture, though with "breaks." So they start = higher in pitch at the bottom of the keyboard and "break back," something = "harmonic mixtures" are claimed do not do. Yet, as I've suggested above, if = "Harmonic mixtures" do include 17 - 19 - 21 - 22, they may begin with those pitches at the low end of the keyboard, but they necessarily *must* ALSO do break back. Yet, at another point, someone made a comment about "harmonic mixtures" as starting with only a few ranks --at what pitches? --and = adding more LOW PITCHS as the mixture ascends through the campass.   How do we understand all this?   Perhaps one final question here: we do see mixtures such as II - IV Rks. Can we usually assume that these are NOT "harmonic mixtures" but simply mixtures that start high in pitches, break back in the usual = fashion but also add more pipes or pitches at the high end of the campass?   A further mixture lecture would be nice. (Well, at least *I* think = so.)   >> "Another dumb question: why do the Phillies keep losing so much of the time?" > > It is a plot to destroy all the Cornets and Sesquialteras in the Philly > organs. When the team loses, people "shed tierce."   This is profound wisdom, save for Philly folks, or at least "Philly Phanatics," where they go "BOOO" instead. I wonder if the organists = playing AGO in Phila. understand the automatic "BOOO" reflex people take on when they get to the city of not-always-so-brotherly "love." :-) or perhaps :-(   GO JAMIE MOYER AND THE SEATTLE MARINERS!!!   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Morton Belcher, please contact me From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2002 19:01:59 -0400   Forgive me for this: I seek Morton Belcher's proper e-mail address. When I used the "Reply" function on my computer to a message he sent me, = my message came back undeliverable.   Karl E. Moyer Lacnaster PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Pedalboard compass From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2002 19:17:43 -0500   George Thalben Ball's "Variations on a Theme of Paganini" uses top F# and G quite a bit. But I don't think there are many other pieces that do. Since the biggest pipes are what costs most of the money in an organ, it is not going to add a lot to the price of the organ to include the top two notes, so one might as well have them, but on older organs that have a 30-note pedalboard I should't think it was worth bothering to add them.   John Speller   pat and ian wrote: > > What published, or other, organ compositions require the top F# and the = G on > a 32-note pedalboard? > > If there aren't any, why do we need 32 notes on the pedalboard? > > Ian. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: NYTimes.com Article: Another Jewel in New York's Crown of Organs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2002 19:38:31 -0500   Another Craig Whitney article ...   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > This article from NYTimes.com > has been sent to you by quilisma@socal.rr.com. > > This from today's NY Times ... > > Cheers, > > Bud > > quilisma@socal.rr.com > > /-------------------- advertisement -----------------------\ > > Explore more of Starbucks at Starbucks.com. > http://www.starbucks.com/default.asp?ci=3D1015 > > \----------------------------------------------------------/ > > Another Jewel in New York's Crown of Organs > > June 22, 2002 > By CRAIG R. WHITNEY > > > > Neither of New York City's biggest concert halls, Avery > Fisher Hall or Carnegie Hall, has a symphonic pipe organ, > but its churches keep building them. > > The latest is the Roman Catholic Church of St. Vincent > Ferrer on the Upper East Side, where a huge truck recently > brought nearly 4,000 pipes from the Schantz Organ Company > in Orrville, Ohio, for a new organ in the gallery. > > Jeffrey D. Dexter, Schantz's tonal director, has been up > there tweedling and thunking ever since, "voicing" the > pipes to make them speak musically the way he and Dr. Mark > Bani, the organist at St. Vincent, designed the instrument > to sound. > > "This organ will play Bach, all the rest of the organ > literature and transcriptions of orchestral music," Dr. > Bani said. "We wanted an organ that could render all types > of music well." > > Mr. Dexter, who is also an organist, says the new organ's > tonal colors are as broad as an orchestra's. It has 86 sets > of pipes, including an ophicleide, whose 44 wooden pipes > range up to 32 feet in length and imitate the sound of a > 19th-century relative of the tuba. The organ even includes > a harp, and a whole positiv section, named for the small > organ with bright, clear sounds for which Baroque composers > wrote. > > "It's not a box of eight crayons, it's a box of 64, with > the sharpener," Mr. Dexter said. "One of the things that > alienated people from the organ for the better part of two > or three generations was that we've been our own worst > enemies, programming music that people didn't go home > humming. This is an organ capable of rendering that kind of > music." > > The musical concept of the organ at St. Vincent Ferrer (869 > Lexington Avenue, at 66th Street) recalls the eclectic > American Classic instruments - able to perform all kinds of > music, from Baroque to post-Romantic - that were produced > by the Aeolian-Skinner Organ Company of Boston and other > manufacturers from the 1930's to the 1950's. > > In New York City, these instruments went into such places > as the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, St. Thomas > Episcopal Church, Riverside Church and even Philharmonic > Hall, which tossed its organ out in an acoustical > renovation when it became Avery Fisher Hall. > > Then, for a few decades, organ builders focused on > producing instruments that reproduced the sounds and > mechanical systems of the organs of Bach's day, sometimes > right down to their uneven-temperament tuning. > > Now the pendulum is swinging back again, with eclectic > instruments like the French Romantic organ completed in > 1993 by Mander Organs of London in the Church of St. > Ignatius Loyola on Park Avenue and the English-style organ, > about the size of St. Vincent Ferrer's, that was installed > last summer by Austin Organs in Grace Church in Brooklyn > Heights. > > Even the 29-voice pipe organ by Johannes Klais Orgelbau of > Bonn that went into Irvington Presbyterian Church in > Irvington-on-Hudson last year is eclectic enough to play > music from all periods, said Dr. F. Anthony Thurman, the > music director there. > > The new Schantz organ in St. Vincent Ferrer cost about $1 > million, said Dr. Bani (pronounced BAY-nee). > > "Father Ramsey said don't spare any cost - we want the best > organ," Dr. Bani said of St. Vincent's previous pastor, the > Rev. Boniface Ramsey, who like his successor, the Rev. > Kevin Robb, is a Dominican priest. > > A Ramsey trumpet, the stop that is the organ's crowning > glory, can be heard after Mr. Dexter finishes the organ > this month and will sound at a special dedication concert > that Dr. Bani is to play on Oct. 20. > > The organ was paid for with two gifts, from the late > William E. Simon and from an anonymous donor, Dr. Bani > said. > > "We struggled with the design of the case," he said, > pointing out how the new organ sits in front of the > Medieval-style lancet stained-glass windows in the church's > west front. Schantz craftsmen distributed the longest pipes > in two carved wooden cases on either side of the windows > and let the bright tin and spotted metal pipes of its > German Baroque section stand free beneath the shimmering > deep blue and red windows. > > The new organ in the gallery is played from the chancel at > the opposite end of the church, on a console that also > controls a separate organ there, built earlier by Schantz. > "It enables us to do some lovely antiphonal effects," Dr. > Bani said, "and the distribution of pipes makes possible a > stereo sound that embraces the listener." > > The Schantz company's magnum opus in the New York area is > the 154-voice instrument it built for the Cathedral > Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark in 1954. The > company, founded by a Swiss immigrant named A. J. Tschantz > in 1873, restored the 6,000-pipe organ Ernest M. Skinner > built in 1931 for Severance Hall, home of the Cleveland > Orchestra, in 2000 after the hall was renovated. This > enabled the orchestra to play works for organ and orchestra > it had been unable to perform for a quarter-century. "The > last time it had played before we restored it was 1976," > Mr. Dexter said. > > The Skinner organ in Cleveland and other pipe organs in > concert halls in Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco and Seattle > are considered essential there, but in New York City only > Alice Tully Hall has a pipe organ, the work of the Swiss > builder Kuhn. > > The St. Vincent Ferrer organ will serve both the Mass and a > mass audience, Dr. Bani hopes. "If you're going to play for > the common listener," he said, "you want to have all > composers represented in a concert, with maybe an > orchestral transcription, so that people will go away > wanting to hear more. Then the organ can be restored to its > place as the king of instruments." > > = http://www.nytimes.com/2002/06/22/arts/music/22ORGA.html?ex=3D1025755337&ei= =3D1&en=3D25a245b0ae54a45f > > HOW TO ADVERTISE > --------------------------------- > For information on advertising in e-mail newsletters > or other creative advertising opportunities with The > New York Times on the Web, please contact > onlinesales@nytimes.com or visit our online media > kit at http://www.nytimes.com/adinfo > > For general information about NYTimes.com, write to > help@nytimes.com. > > Copyright 2002 The New York Times Company > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org