PipeChat Digest #2935 - Tuesday, June 25, 2002
 
Re: Felix Hell at Bel Air - LA
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net>
REVIEW: Ken Cowan @ Crystal Cathedral - 6.21.02 (X-post)
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net>
Deleting Extra Material
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Small is beautiful
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Student Organists of Holy Family Cathedral
  by "Audrey Jacobsen" <AJ1995@cox.net>
Re: Organist Recruiting
  by "Mike Swaldo" <mswal@adelphia.net>
Re: play in F#
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Saint Vincent Ferrer
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Small is beautiful
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: REVIEW: Ken Cowan @ Crystal Cathedral - 6.21.02 (X-post)
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
re: small/digital/traditional.
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: play in F#
  by <DrB88@aol.com>
Re: pedal exercises
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Schlicker (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Felix Hell at Bel Air - LA From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 11:22:09 -0700   I went, and also to Ken Cowan at Crystal Cathedral Friday night.... I'll = be writing reviews to both when I catch a few minutes to do so.   Cheers,   Jonathan       > IF anyone went to the Felix Hell concert at Bel Air Presbyterian Church > this afternoon, please post a report/Review. > > Thanks > > > > Douglas A. Campbell > Skaneateles, NY > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.370 / Virus Database: 205 - Release Date: 6/5/02    
(back) Subject: REVIEW: Ken Cowan @ Crystal Cathedral - 6.21.02 (X-post) From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 12:27:46 -0700   Dear friends,   I have waited a bit to write this, since I wanted to let my impressions settle a bit - not to mention I needed to recover from the ego-bruising = I've suffered over the last 3 days <chuckle>. (I had my first organ lesson in 4 years and went to a Ken Cowan and a Felix Hell concert all in that short space... if that doesn't ruin me, nothing will!)   The concert started on the smaller Arboretum organ, an Aeolian-Skiiner formerly housed in the 1st Church of Christ, Scientist in Beverly Hills, = and relocated after the Northridge earthquake severely damaged the 1st Church faciltites. Ken greeted us warmly, and spoke with dry wit about his first piece, the monumental Introduction, Passacaglia & Fugue by Healy Willan. = He then launched into an energetic (and highly musical) rendition of this piece, which I had only heard once before (and that on a recording). = After this rich feast of color, a stroke of programming genius: 2 little = bon-bons by Bossi - the gorgeous "Ave Maria" and the enjoyable "Giga", both = renedered sensitively and expressively, and serving as a musical sorbet to cleanse = the pallete before he launched into an amazing rendition of the Overture to Oberon, (transcription) full of color, imagination and humor. We came to the end of the first half, and Ken was rewarded with generous applause for = a flawless and enjoyable performance.   Next we adjourned to the Cathedral for the second half of the concert, = where Ken treated us to a couple more transcriptions - this time both by Saint-Saens: something from Sampson et Delila (slips my mind at the = moment) and the Danse Macabre. This was a truly orchestral rendition, with a = myriad of colors and layers of sound... one could close the eyes and HEAR the orchestra. I don't usually care for more than 1 transcription per = concert, but I could listen to Ken play them all day on a large colorful instrument.... they are wonderful, exciting, colorful and above all, = highly MUSICAL.... Ken IS the orchestra! Last on the program was the Reger = fantasy on "How Brightly Shines the Morning Star", and I was ready to hear what = Ken would do with it. Once again we were dazzled with sheer musicality and virtuosity, as Ken tossed this one off with seeming ease...   At the conclusion of the concert, Ken was rewarded with a standing "O" and numerous shouts of "Bravo!"..... we thought he was done, but (even as some were starting to leave) he slid enegetically back onto the bench and launched into "Ride of the Valkyries" (we all sat back down, of course!). If there was any doubt before this that we were in the presence of a virtuoso of the highest rank, it was banished at this point.... I do not believe I've ever heard such flawless playing of this piece, and such command of the mighty CC instrument's colors - I heard Guy Henderson, = Chris Pardini AND Fred Swann all remark their amazement at how fully Ken was = able to utilize the instrument with such a short time to assimilate it...   Chris Pardini invited me to come up and see the console ("after the smoke clears from that performance", he joked) and I was able to touch the = console and be overwhelmed by its size. As it was 10 minutes before Garden = Grove's noise abatement ordinance (and who would have the temerity to touch the = keys after THAT performance!) I did not try the organ, but Chris graciously invited me to come back again sometime when there was more time and try = the organ (thanks Chris!)   Oh. Did I mention Ken played the entire concert WITHOUT A SCORE IN SIGHT!!!!   Cheers,   Jonathan Orwig, Pastor of Worship First Baptist Church of Riverside, CA     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.370 / Virus Database: 205 - Release Date: 6/5/02    
(back) Subject: Deleting Extra Material From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 14:38:14 -0500   I'm new to the list, so forgive me if this is old ground, but I might suggest--very kindly and gently--deleting extra material when you reply to = a post. Particularly when one receives the digest form, one must scroll through all the previous responses to specific messages. If you read each as a separate email, it's not so much a problem because you don't have to scroll past to get to the next message.   Just a little chatter from an Erzahler! Dennis Steckley "For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God."    
(back) Subject: Small is beautiful From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 21:12:55 +0100     Hello,   Scaling the dizzy heights at 5ft 6in or so, and only counter-balanced by = 9st (126lbs) I am very glad that I was self taught as an organist. I = tried various exercises but found them impossible; half my body weight = flailing about and throwing me off balance.   I would therefore make a plea to any teacher of organ; especially those = of a "Haupt" disposition, to spare a thought for the vertically = challenged like myself.   I still remember the advice...."Keep your knees together"....as if I = were a young maiden on a date. I tried that and ended up playing with my = nose.   Pedal scales using extensive "heels" were always a nightmare, with Bach = going to pieces around my feet.   So, I didn't so much develop a technique as an excuse for pedalling = which, in spite of everything, seems to work.   I can honestly say that, with no exceptions, every piece of music I play = has its own unique pedalling......it certainly increases practise time.=20   This is, however, the only way that I can balance the requirements of = phrasing with the required security of contact and self-confidence which = comes with that.   Toes only? I've been doing that for years in Bach.   It's not really a handicap being small, but it makes life difficult at = times.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     -----Original Message----- From: "pipechat@pipechat.org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> on behalf of = "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Sent: 24 June 2002 15:10 To: "'pipechat@pipechat.org'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: pedal exercises   When I was growing up we used to use Nielson[sp?] and Yon's pedal = exercise books. Are those still in favor? If not then what do teachers give to students for pedal exercises?     Robert B. Colasacco Administrative Assistant/Secretary Distinguished Colleagues Population Council One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza New York, NY 10017 Direct Telephone: (212) 339-0685 e-mail: rcolasacco@popcouncil.org Visit our web site: www.popcouncil.org     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Student Organists of Holy Family Cathedral From: "Audrey Jacobsen" <AJ1995@cox.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 13:38:22 -0700   Dear List, Some clarifications to Ron Severin's generous article.   1. Mass Participation. The student organists (ages 6 - 14) play organ solos for the BISHOP'S Mass on Sunday mornings at 9:30 AM. Our parish Cathedral has a membership of 10,000. The six weekend Masses with music usually have a full-capacity attendance of 800. All 18 children who play these organ solos are students at the Cathedral School and/or their = families are members of the Holy Family Cathedral Parish. This performance opportunity is limited to my students with the Holy Family Parish/School connection. The organ students typically participate in Mass once or = twice a month.   2. Fulbright Scholarship. My Fulbright (with renewal) was for study in Italy. The 2 years of previous study in Switzerland, Italy and France = were done as private, post-graduate study.   I want to add that this student organists project has the wonderful = support of Fr. Arthur Holquin, Rector of Holy Family Cathedral, and Matthew Gray, Director of Music Ministries at the Cathedral.   Audrey Jacobsen   ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Subject: Re: Training young organists   > Dear Richard Jordan and list: > Audrey Jacobsen of Holy Family Cathedral, Orange CA has indeed = undertaken >the task to train young organists for church service. They range in age from >6 to 17. Local organ shops have donated organs for these children to >practice at home. There are about 18-20 in this most worthwhile program. = 4 >or 5 children play a Mass each week at the 9:30 Children's Mass. They = are >studying both Piano and Organ with Audrey and are very enthusiastic in being >able to participate making conntributions to the Divine Service. Several >students are also beginning to play from memory. This is great to see, = and >hope others will also develop their own outreach programs as Audrey has >done. Audrey was awarded Fulbright Scholarships to study in Paris and in >Rome. > The Cathedral Church is located between the 5 and 600 block of Glassell >St. Orange CA. > This is a week by week encounter with the organ, and these students are >hooked on the King of Instruments.                              
(back) Subject: Re: Organist Recruiting From: "Mike Swaldo" <mswal@adelphia.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 17:17:57 -0700   Hi,   I think just letting a kid experience the great joy of producing sound on = a magnificent is a good way. Last December, there were two young kids from outside the congregation. The boy was 9 and his sister, I think, was 10. They both like to sing, and their grandmother likes to get them around in different churches. The boy sang for me last summer, and was very good. = At Christmas, the girl wanted to sing too. When I was working with the boy, = I noticed the girl sitting back with her Grandma, wiping her eyes. "Oh my," = I though. "Did I do something to upset her?"   When she came up to the piano to work on her song, I asked what was wrong. She said that she wants to sing, but she's afraid of being in front of all those people. "Well," I said," Let's just worry about working on music = now, and we'll worry about that later. I'll tell you what. If you do a nice = job on both these verses, I'll let you play the organ." She smiled and nodded yes. Both kids had been fascinated by the organ. When she finished her song, everyone piled around the organ. She sat next to me on the bench. = I had her place her left foot over the low D pedal. I said, "When I say = now, push the pedal. When I say off, take your foot off." I started play the Bach D Minor Toccata. When I got to the big diminshed chord, I said = "Now!." She pushed the pedal. and I played the rest of the chord. She was = thrilled. At each pedal point, she played it, and at the more involved places, I = said, "Let me do this one."   The boy got his share too-- he enjoyed working the stops. Both of these kids do not take piano lessons, but hopefully, this experience might have planted a seed of interest.   Best wishes, Mike          
(back) Subject: Re: play in F# From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 16:14:38 -0500   Actually, Steinway built him a transposing grand, which is in the Smithsonian musical instruments collection.   Paul Opel   >I missed the beginning of this conversation, but are you all aware that >Irving Berlin, who wrote some great tunes, could not read music and could >only play in the key of F-sharp? He had a special upright piano with a >transposer built in. > > >Randy Runyon >Music Director >Zion Lutheran Church >Hamilton, Ohio >runyonr@muohio.edu   http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Saint Vincent Ferrer From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 18:19:08 EDT   The new Schantz is grand, warm, and singing, with generous scaling = that locks onto the room and rings beautifully. From the softest undulants to = the largest of the reeds, it's a success. It is extraordinarily well-crafted = on the interior. I have yet to hear it with the room full of worshippers; that will be next. Dedication is set for late October. I met with Jeff Dexter, Tonal Director, who was finishing up work with =   his assistant and his charming daughter in attendance. We hope to swap visits, so he can see the Temple organ tomorrow, which is only three = blocks away.   Seb  
(back) Subject: Re: Small is beautiful From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 21:37:34 EDT   Thanks, Colin, for providing an alternative.   >Scaling the dizzy heights at 5ft 6in or so, and only counter-balanced by = 9st >(126lbs) << [snip]   I can see all of us rather ample-sized organists doing the math in order = to convert our bulk into "stones." It just sounds so much more civilized. Thanks to the Atkins Diet, I have dropped 38 pounds in less than three months. It was a necessity as my weight was about to be expressed in = "metric tons."   Yes, I agree this is totally off topic but I am now more organically = healthy. <groan>   Shrinking and loving it, Jim Pitts  
(back) Subject: Re: REVIEW: Ken Cowan @ Crystal Cathedral - 6.21.02 (X-post) From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 22:27:08 EDT   What a good review! I suspect it comes as no surprise to anyone who has = heard Ken in person and this afternoon I was listening to his CD from the U of = Pa on my computer speakers.   He dazzled his Washington audience last fall at National Pres, too. = Listening this afternoon to the CD I couldn't help but wonder where or how one = acquires such technique and puts it so well in service of the music at hand. I = guess there is just one word to describe it, and that is "genius." Those of us = who were fortunate enough to hear him at Duke Chapel last summer were likewise =   blown away by what he was able to do there, including a brilliant accompaniment of a hymn. We were interested to read this evening in the newest edition of TAO that he has been appointed to the organ staff at St. =   Bartholomew's in New York. Definitely a reason to get on Amtrak (if it survives) and head up to hear him there.   At a time when people are bemoaning the lack of younger organists coming = up through the ranks, it is most heartening to know that we have the likes of =   Ken Cowan and Felix and others taking their rightful places.   Beyond their sheer musical brilliance, both of these young men have great personal charisma and the ability to communicate with their audiences = during concerts and afterwards.   Perhaps we have seen the future, at least in some part, and there is cause =   for rejoicing rather than dismay at some major talents taking their place among the most talented and inspiring members of the profession!    
(back) Subject: re: small/digital/traditional. From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Sun, 23 Jun 2002 16:19:58 -0500   Hi all:   I've been speed reading the past weeks posts concerning small organs or digital. I'd like to throw my 2 cents onto the pile now. Summer is always supposed to be a slack time, but I got involved in a local production of "Mame", and also garden tasks have exceeded all expectations, do to travel to care for my parents elsewhere. Otherwise you might have already heard from me several times! LOL   When our company was founded in 1953, one of the first tasks was to take over a job that the other builder had walked away "mentally disturbed". Sadly the project began as an honest approach to save the church money, purchasing an "ideal" used pipe organ, rather than resorting to a electonic toaster (yeh, I said toaster, it was really the toaster era, hot enuf in the back of the console to make toast). It was our founder's Opus 1...and btw, is still going strong, but has had some "upgrades". Some of the problems found at the site were many junctions....in ceilings, under floors, behind pews, etc. The guy doing the work had been using every scrap from the original location of the beast. Some cables had splices every 8 or 10 feet! And that was with cotton/wax type stuff.   Another instance we've just completed a new console and control for a large "mess" in NW Arkansas. The builder did nothing to back up his claims, other than they got a "new" console. The DAMN thing was made from lumber core panels, usually used for making doors on cabinets for your garage or utility room. Keyboards had been recycled, with new coverings so sloppily put on and cut, that no two keys looked alike. The drawstop jambs had genuine "faux slate" formica covering. It was a mess. Here again, what started as an honest and earnest goal of saving the church money, turned into a mess.   To this date, we have built two single manual organs. One is presently in use in Toano, VA, at Hickory Neck Congregation; two extended ranks, Holzgedeckt (8') and Principal (4'). It has a 24 note pedalboard coupled to the manual, and the manual is divided, with the pedalboard the bass end of things.   Another small organ is of 6 ranks, split keyboard, and a 12 note "drone" pedal board. We decided to build up something to use with symphony chorus, and other things that needed to be portable.   While these two instrument serve well, they do have limitations for literature. But a little emagination makes things work a little bit further!   Through the years we've built many small 2m organs to compete directly with electronics. While in the past (20's -50's) many larger firms have done unit organs with limited success, this has been our "bread and butter" for the most part.   With careful attention to scaling, voicing and winchests, a builder CAN SUCCESSFULLY build a small organ to COMPETE head on with an electronic, and do it for less money than often quoted. Some of the larger firms are pricing churches out of the market for pipe organs, and into the hands of the electronic industry. (I'm speaking of 2m/pd sized consoles here).   The call by the industry has always been "state of the art", and "more like a pipe organ than ever before".   I will not say that there is no room for some of these instruments, but things need to be told honestly. Most electonic folks in the past have counted on a "resale" or "upgrade" in 5-10 yrs. This was something that was incouraged by a manufacturer, I know, I was there, and used to work for a dealer of XYZ organs.   We have built some custom digital organs, and have used digital voices to augment pipe organs. But we are very judicious in this. One time the addition of some digital voices actually cost about the same as adding necessary pipe work to fill those positions in the stop board. We opted for pipe work additions.   I guess in all my rambling here, what I'm trying to express is that small pipe organs can be flexible, exciting, and beautiful, with out being expensive. It's not unusual for us to build an instrument of 6-10 rks for a church seating a few hundred people, and receive raves about the instrument.   Best Wishes to all...and I hope it's not as hot where you are as it is here.   Now I need to go pick black berries....     Jon Bertschinger Tonal Director Temple Organs Saint Joseph, MO (North Kansas City area)    
(back) Subject: Re: play in F# From: <DrB88@aol.com> Date: Tue, 25 Jun 2002 00:14:17 EDT     --part1_12b.13382e10.2a494819_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I have long since changed my approach in teaching scales to beginning pianists as well. C major may have no sharps or flats to read, but the = lack of black keys makes it more difficult for the beginner to remember where = the thumb crossings should occur on the keyboard. For a number of years now I =   have begun teaching scales with B, F# and C#, since the fingerings are = much more consistent...2,3 and 4 on black keys, thumbs on white keys. I then continue backwards around the circle of fifths with E, A, D, G and = C...then do the flats.   I am a firm believer that a good musician should be equally comfortable in =   all keys--major and minor--and I try to instill that in my students' = minds. I can't resist adding my favorite line to my advanced keyboard harmony classes...they quote it to underclassmen with great regularity... "there = are no HARD keys, only NEGLECTED keys!"   David   --part1_12b.13382e10.2a494819_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I have long since changed my approach in = teaching scales to beginning pianists as well.&nbsp; C major may have no = sharps or flats to read, but the lack of black keys makes it more = difficult for the beginner to remember where the thumb crossings should = occur on the keyboard.&nbsp; For a number of years now I have begun = teaching scales with B, F# and C#, since the fingerings are much more = consistent...2,3 and 4 on black keys, thumbs on white keys.&nbsp; I then = continue backwards around the circle of fifths with E, A, D, G and = C...then do the flats.<BR> <BR> I am a firm believer that a good musician should be equally comfortable in = all keys--major and minor--and I try to instill that in my students' = minds.&nbsp; I can't resist adding my favorite line to my advanced = keyboard harmony classes...they quote it to underclassmen with great = regularity... "there are no HARD keys, only NEGLECTED keys!"<BR> <BR> David </FONT></HTML>   --part1_12b.13382e10.2a494819_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: pedal exercises From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Tue, 25 Jun 2002 00:42:28 EDT     --part1_169.f96a145.2a494eb4_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I still recommend those books, and used them after my back surgeries to regain my pedal technique. They are still the best of which I know. (Of course, I am in a small town without a music store in which to browse = through organ music.) But, they worked for me. Lee   --part1_169.f96a145.2a494eb4_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I still recommend those = books, and used them after my back surgeries to regain my pedal technique. = &nbsp;They are still the best of which I know. &nbsp;(Of course, I am in a = small town without a music store in which to browse through organ music.) = &nbsp;But, they worked for me. &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_169.f96a145.2a494eb4_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Schlicker (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 23:50:51 -0700   For those not on piporg1, the Schlicker Organ Co. has announced that they have closed their doors "permanently" ... Schlicker's unbuilt contracts are to be completed by an unnamed firm in Milwaukee.   Cheers,   Bud