PipeChat Digest #2729 - Friday, March 1, 2002
 
Re: More on "Brother of Sleep"  XPOSTED
  by "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com>
Hips swaying in time to the music
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Hips swaying in time to the music
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: vinyl
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: 1940 Hymnal
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
vinyl
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Composers Performing their Own Compositions
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
RE: Composers Performing their Own Compositions
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
composers
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Acoustical problems
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Re: vinyl
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: vinyl
  by "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@earthlink.net>
Re: vinyl
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Hips swaying in time to the music
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: vinyl
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: vinyl
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: More on "Brother of Sleep" XPOSTED From: "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 02:51:52 -0800 (PST)   Thanks, Hans!   --- Mack <mack02445@mindspring.com> wrote: > Greetings Listers,' > > I have taken this one step further and consulted the > Internet Movie > Database, (imdb.com), and that site lists what is > available i.e.: cd's, > dvd's videos, and alas no cd's of the soundtrack. > :-(. And although he > didn't mention it, Felix has recorded the Toccata > too on the Schantz at The > Cathedral in Newark. > > Cheers, > Mack > > Felix Hell wrote: > > > The Toccata has been released twice by WERGO > (Schott International). > > I have no knowledge whether or not the complete > film soundtrack > > had been released on a CD. > > > > Felix > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Greetings - Send FREE e-cards for every occasion! http://greetings.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Hips swaying in time to the music From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 07:05:44 -0600   On Tuesday, I went to an interminable staff meeting. But at the end the organizer/facilitator had invited a chiropractor (sp?) and his massage and physical therapy staff to come in and do a presentation on ergonomics, which was OK. But they had brought their little "trapeze" thingy that one steps on, and it determines alignment and whether the weight is evenly balanced between the feet.   Anyway, mine was not, and he was more concerned with how many automobile accidents I had had (I gathered from the presentation that he was an expert for plaintiff's personal injury attorneys). However, I have felt good the last few weeks other than a bug I caught this weekend. I realized that the imbalance is probably due to my "favoring" the left hip more lately. (Side query: does one "favor" the injured side by using the other more, or does one "favor" the uninjured side to prevent pain in the injured side?)   All this to pose the question that occurred to me: have any of you or your doctors noticed a correlation between organ playing and hip problems? And more particularly, left hip problems? I have known one or two organists who have had hip replacement surgery, but did not know but what whether they, like me, have degenerative conditions due to other factors.   Just would like to hear some erudite discussion on this particular issue.   Thanks,   Glenda Sutton (not your typical ambulance chaser)      
(back) Subject: Re: Hips swaying in time to the music From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 10:44:26 EST   Dear Glenda:   Hip replacements usually occur from favoring one foot on the pedalboard, over another. Avoidence of auto accidents helps too. :) I can't believe = you have so many problems, but then that's Glenda. Just getting old causes a lot of degeneration and pain. Hip replacements aren't a slam dunk = either. You'd miss a lot of fun at the local ECUSA in a wheel chair. It takes = months to heal from that. Besides, who would be around to clean up after sloppy altar servers, and give them some direction as to their duties? The doctor prescribes a shot of *Moon* just before, during and after the service. The Widor will never sound better! :)   I couldn't resist, forgive me,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: RE: vinyl From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 11:58:22 -0500   Ross writes:   >Glad to see someone else supporting old records. I'm regarded as a nutter by my musical friends as I've kept my entire collection.... some 12,500 lp's here at least.   Same here, only I have a mere 3000. You must be insulating your house = with a library like that.   On balance, I am by no means opposed to, or dismissive of, compact discs. The number of organ and choral recordings sold today is an avalanche compared to the offerings that were available at any one time on LP. = Niche markets like ourselves are no longer so much at the mercy of what the = major labels decide to plug or neglect. Whatever one may think of the = comparative sound, this is good news. This happy state of affairs may be due in part = to the higher prices to which we have become inured. No doubt it is also the fact that CDs need not be produced in such large quantities. The Internet as a means of publicity and marketing must be a factor, too. And digitization itself is a sort of fountain of youth. As long as the = physical media on which the data is kept are renewed as necessary, the sound is = kept from degrading.   However, whether this is actually done is a question for commercial interests and large institutions. The man in the street is still largely = at the mercy of whatever these entities decide either to reissue, preserve, = or cast into oblivion.   One of the most important benefits of recordings is that they preserve performances over time-- possibly long times. The Philadelphia area has a small company dedicated to the electronic cleaning, enhancement, and = reissue on CD of old recordings from their original 78s or various other media, = some even older. (From the standpoint of longevity, shellac rolls are even hardier than LPs and 78s.) During a presentation at a meeting two years ago at the Curtis Institute, two partners in this small company played for the audience several recordings of a single piano piece and a single opera aria by various performers current and old. The differences in interpretation were amazing. In some ways, these differences are as we would expect from verbal descriptions of performance practice; but in = other ways, the essences are indescribable. Whether one ends up preferring an older style or not, it is important for both performers and music-lovers = to have a perspective on these differences. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we could hear first-hand how Buxtehude, Couperin, Bach, or Franck actually played their own music?   Regardless of medium, I am afraid, however, that it is not inherently in = the interest of commerce to recycle anything old or to foster historical consciousness in a population of consumers. The interest of commerce is necessarily to promote what is new, and therefore to denigrate what is = old. Besides, living in a timeless vacuum leaves one much more suggestible and prone to manipulation. Let us hope that there will always be enterprises like the one above to serve the determined nonconformists among us software-wise. But when it comes to hardware, the cost of producing a mechanically or technologically sophisticated product in small quantities easily becomes prohibitive, as organ builders and churches know all too well. In this way, mass production is a powerful enforcer of conformity. Anyone with minds of their own must be as vigilant as possible, lest they fall victim to obsolecences, whether accidental or planned, that sever = them from an entire cultural legacy.      
(back) Subject: RE: 1940 Hymnal From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 13:03:17 -0500   Tim Rand writes in PIPORG-L:   >Call me old fashioned, but I think it's the best hymnal of the past century.   I agree, unless the best is _The English Hymnal_.   When the 1982 hymnal was being compiled, I was new to AAM, which I assumed was still the champion of musical quality and tradition that its founders envisioned. During the exciting Los Angeles conference, the first I had ever attended, the organization was reveling in this book-- so many of its contributors were members, after all, and vice versa-- so, I thought, it must be good.   I wanted a hymnal that contained some of the stirring twentieth-century hymns and tunes that had appeared in Hymns Ancient and Modern Revised: Michael, Love Unknown, Naphill, Dolberrow, Remission, Sancta Civitas, Salisbury.... (Some of these made it into the 1982 hymnal, others did = not.) A "hymn explosion" was underway worldwide, and it was passing the = Episcopal Church by.   Furthermore, I was approaching middle age and still could not sing an authorized hymn written in my lifetime. Was this right? My entire generation was being insulted.   There were also mischievous vestiges in my thinking of that fairly = standard, or at least representative, book of my student days: Archibald Davison's "Church Music: Illusion and reality" whose quest for quality took the form of an aversion to almost everything Victorian. Accordingly, I was of the opinion that the 1940 hymnal, for all its undoubted excellences, also contained a lot of "dead wood."   Well, it wasn't long before I was glad to sing from the 1940 hymnal again = in the few parishes hereabouts who either never abandoned it at all or who = gave the new hymnal a try and then actually went back. The organization of the service portion is a disaster. The typography is inscrutable. The texts are too often mangled in deference to purely political conceits of the = day. I do appreciate some of the new contents, but they do not exceed the = losses. Since hymnal supplements seem now to be an all-but-standard feature in our pews to accommodate evolutions and ethnicities-- the appearance of a pointedly up-to-date new hymnal barely momentarily slaking the thirst for these-- I would now, on balance, prefer that the 1940 hymnal were the one being supplemented.   This brief enthusiasm of mine for the 1982 hymnal was an instructive and chastening experience, perhaps a bit of a midlife crisis, and a final = fling with trendiness. I'm not so liable to make such a mistake again.   (I'm posting this in PIPECHAT to avoid another slap on the wrist for off-topicality).   Paul    
(back) Subject: vinyl From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 1 Mar 2002 09:09:06 +1300   Paul, Thank you for your reply to my comments and thank you also for your = comments on pipechat - they are much appreciated and always worth reading. Believe me, I'd spend money on CDs if I had the money, but now being = retired on a small income I just haven't got it (sad smile). Somehow, though, I = have to figure out a way to have an extra 2 or 3 hours a day just to listen to music (another sad smile because it won't happen). Thanks again, Ross      
(back) Subject: Composers Performing their Own Compositions From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 14:50:03 -0500       "Emmons, Paul" wrote: > Wouldn't it be wonderful if we > could hear first-hand how Buxtehude, Couperin, Bach, or Franck actually > played their own music? >   It would be intresting to hear, perhaps with polite applause I suspect that we'd be disappointed. Musicianship is Interpretation and Performance   Stan    
(back) Subject: RE: Composers Performing their Own Compositions From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 16:45:41 -0500   Stanley Lowkis writes:   >It would be intresting to hear, perhaps with polite applause I suspect = that we'd be disappointed. Musicianship is Interpretation and Performance   You sound like at least a potential disciple of the biologist Rupert Sheldrake. He claims that there is a mysterious influence among members = of a species, such that the very act of learning something for the first time paves the way for all others to learn it more easily, even though there no overt communication takes place. How else can one explain-- or even = believe in-- the fact that instrumental technique has increased so spectacularly since Bach and Beethoven, even since Liszt, all of whom were regarded as superlative in their own days?   >Musicianship is Interpretation and Performance.   Yes; therefore, if Buxtehude, Bach, Couperin, and Franck were excellent musicians, then their interpretations and performances ought to be of = great interest to us.   I know that some composers are not performers, and others are not particularly distinguished performers-- but I chose these four names carefully.   Bach was known in his own day *primarily* as a resourceful, consummate, = and to some extent revolutionary performer. I can well imagine that one of = his performances might sound lackluster to a listener today who has been jaded by virtuosic speed-demons. The authenticity of this kind of playing has been debated. Voices of moderation, such as the French in the early part = of the century (didn't Schweitzer say that Bach should be played as slowly as one's musicianship allows?), who look for merit elsewhere than in = breakneck tempi, would be vindicated or at least reconsidered. Then again, maybe the speed demons would be vindicated. We don't entirely know, do we?   Buxtehude was also a famous performer. I thought of his name in this context because of the free and improvisatory nature of many of his compositions. The performances that take this characteristic and run with it, instead of just plodding through a piece according to the literal notation one sees, are revelations (e.g. one on a recording by a thirteen-year-old Felix Hell). I'd love to hear what the young J.S. Bach heard at Lubeck, such as to make him go weeks AOL [formerly a well-known military acronym standing for "absent over leave"] from his first post.   As to Couperin, I continue to find the whole "notes inegale" idea so = elusive as to have no confidence at all in playing music in this school. How certain about it can we from the verbal instructions or descriptions that have come down to us? They sound suspiciously like how someone today = might try to explain the rhythms of jazz, and might be just as inadequate. Do = you think you could become a jazz musician by reading about it?   Pater Seraphicus, too, was such a great exponent of improvisation that I'd like to hear how he performed his own written compositions. Many of us in this country stand in the Widor/Dupre pedagogical tradition of technique, analysis, scholarship, and discipline. Franck was outside this school of thought. When he taught organ at the Conservatoire, this subject was considered part of harmony rather than an instrumental technique in its = own right. It is known that Widor's values, which most us basically take for granted now, astonished the students that he inherited from Franck because they were so different. Most of them came to respect these values, but = they did not lose their love for their old teacher; and a few of them clung to his teachings by preference.      
(back) Subject: composers From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 1 Mar 2002 11:50:14 +1300   Paul, Again, you are so right. It would indeed be wonderful to hear composers playing their own works. I believe Widor played THE Toccata far slower = than we do today. Too, wasn't it one of Bach's sons who said that his Dad = played everything legato that he could? And yet these days it's the fashion to = play JSB so fast and so staccato you can't hear the harmony or counterpoint, = the pipes fail to speak properly, and there is no phrasing since all is staccato. I want to scream and run away when this happens. Just last Sunday I played for a service on the ugly 2-deck allen = electronic in our local church. My voluntaries were early Italian stuff. During Communion I played very slowly indeed one of those chromatic slow-moving Elevations by Frescobaldi on just the Flute Celeste with the box fairly = well closed, i.e. ppp. Many people said "thanks" afterwards, saying they knew nothing about music and thus had no idea what I was doing, but they felt = it sounded just right. Mind you, to be correct it would have been a Principal Celeste, but there isn't one there, and the Flute Celeste is of "harder" tone than a proper flute anyway. Oh yes, to make it sound better in the = dead and drab acoustics of this fully-carpeted building, I added a VERY soft = 16ft (on the Pedal), duplicating my manual notes, as it needed warmth without loudness. I hope that's acceptable to the "purists" - but when there's = only a loust electronic you have to make do! (Sad grin). Again, thanks, Ross      
(back) Subject: Re: Acoustical problems From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 15:09:31 +0000       "Emmons, Paul" wrote:   > Del Case wrote about the Mormon Tabernacle, Salt Lake City: > > >Now if they could only do something about the acoustical problems in = that > room. > > I didn't know there were any there (although I'm not doubting your = words). > What kind of problems? > > As a tourist years ago, I remember sitting in the audience while a man > walked in, announced that he would drop a pin, did so onto a hollow = wooden > box, and walked out again. One could literally hear a pin drop, quite > clearly. Whether the acoustics are good or poor to our ears, the owners = of > the building are obviously proud of them. They attribute this success = to > the fact that the orignal 19th century construction is mainly wooden. > > One does see, however, that the ceiling is basically a single rounded = shape. > Concave surfaces tend to cause foci and standing waves. Is this what = you > have in mind?   Yes, that is exactly what I have in mind. There are places where sound is canceled and others where things are emphasized.   I attended the Western AGO Regional a number of years ago as an = adjudicator for the Young Organist Competition. A number of events, of course, were = in the Tabernacle. I got to hear the organ from several different locations, as suggested by a former student who was Dean of the SLC Chapter. I was particularly interested in the affect of the organ in different parts of the room since = I was scheduled to play a recital there a number of months later. There are = places where, in spite of a large complement of 32s and 16s, there is almost no = bass line. Other parts of the organ are similarly affected in other parts of the = room. While sound generally carries well, it is not what would normally be considered = a live room.   Steven wrote:     "By the way, I remember the acoustics as being superb, especially when I = sat near the antiphonal organ at the back of the room during a noon day = recital and it felt like the bombards were literally pushing my chest in!"   Yes Steven. This illustrates the situation beautifully. In the back is a = good place to hear the organ because it is the exact opposite of the organ location.The "Whispering Gallery" effect.   Hearing a pin drop is hardly a demonstration of "perfect" acoustics. Particularly when it is done with people standing at the correct "opposite" point under = the dome from the pin drop and the pin is dropped on a surface designed to provide = some acoustical (natural) amplification.   The "perfect acoustics" are a myth. A myth that does not deserve to be perpetuated.   Having said that, I would hasten to add that I have profound respect and admiration for the quality of the music that comes from Temple Square and = for the musicians who produce it. I am deeply honored to have played a = recital there and the time I spent was very rewarding. Particularly since my = family could join me for a week of Utah skiing afterward!   Del W. Case Pacific Union College   Steven   > > > > > > -----Original Message----- > > From: Del Case [SMTP:dcase@puc.edu] > > Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2002 4:15 PM > > To: PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu > > Subject: Great reeds, etc. > > > > > Emmons, Paul wrote: > > > > > > > > > > > > I seem to remember in Harrison's letter to Willis III (in Callahan's > > > book) that he admiringly describes the design of the reedless Great > > --- > > > something the Tabernacle folks have changed in years since -- a = native > > > > > reed chorus having been added (can't remember who made them) some = time > > ago. > > > > > > Yes, there have been additions, changes and "re" finishing done at = the > > > > Tabernacle by Schoenstein. I have played the organ since that work = was > > done > > and many of the frustrations I previously felt have been resolved. = The > > additions > > included Great reeds. The Bombard reeds did NOT function as a > > substitute for > > Great reeds. > > > > Now if they could only do something about the acoustical problems in > > that > > room. > > > > A lack of reeds on the Great is only one of the problems encountered > > when > > trying > > to play French music on a typical "American Classic" organ whether by > > Harrison > > or other American builders. > > > > Del W. Case > > Pacific Union College > > > > = :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: > > Note: opinions expressed on PIPORG-L are those of the individual = con- > > tributors and not necessarily those of the list owners nor of the = Uni- > > versity at Albany. For a brief summary of list commands, send mail = to > > listserv@listserv.albany.edu saying GET LSVCMMDS.TXT or see the = web > > page at http://www.albany.edu/piporg-l/lsvcmmds.html . > > = ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::    
(back) Subject: Re: vinyl From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 17:52:35 -0600   Hi, List!   There's at least *one* more person here that is firmly convinced of the merits of LP recordings...I've often said that they can come up with all the new whiz-bang "better-and-better" systems/formats/mediums that they want to (and I'll judge each on its merits when the time comes) but in the =   meantime, you'll pry my turntable outta my cold, dead fingers!! <lol>   I don't have the huge collection (Ross, Paul) of LP's *yet*, but I'm working on it... ;-) I routinely find interesting "treasures" (of every flavor!) in the record bins at a couple of local thrift stores. Usually for less than a buck a piece. EBay is also a good source these days, but you're likely to pay a bit more. Lots and lots of organ LPs on there at any given time. (it all depends on *just* how badly you want that George Montalba album...)   While we're out here near the fringes of topicality <lol>, anyone got an infallible source for good cheap replacement stylii?   Cheers,   Tim (who'd love to hear more about that Sony laser-record-reader thingie...did =   they ever make it to production?)    
(back) Subject: Re: vinyl From: "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 19:07:07 -0500   J&R Music World has replacement stylii. Find them on the web at http://www.jandr.com   Tim Bovard wrote:   > Hi, List! > > There's at least *one* more person here that is firmly convinced of the > merits of LP recordings...I've often said that they can come up with all > the new whiz-bang "better-and-better" systems/formats/mediums that they > want to (and I'll judge each on its merits when the time comes) but in = the > meantime, you'll pry my turntable outta my cold, dead fingers!! <lol> > > I don't have the huge collection (Ross, Paul) of LP's *yet*, but I'm > working on it... ;-) I routinely find interesting "treasures" (of every > flavor!) in the record bins at a couple of local thrift stores. Usually > for less than a buck a piece. EBay is also a good source these days, = but > you're likely to pay a bit more. Lots and lots of organ LPs on there at > any given time. (it all depends on *just* how badly you want that = George > Montalba album...) > > While we're out here near the fringes of topicality <lol>, anyone got an > infallible source for good cheap replacement stylii? > > Cheers, > > Tim > (who'd love to hear more about that Sony laser-record-reader = thingie...did > they ever make it to production?) > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- ***************************************************** Healthcare references for everyone. "Recipient of the year 2000 Featured Site Award at healthAtoZ.com" http://home.earthlink.net/~marika57/m_erika.html   Internet Safety Lessons. Must reading for everyone. http://home.earthlink.net/~marika57/safetylessons.html *****************************************************      
(back) Subject: Re: vinyl From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 1 Mar 2002 14:54:46 +1300   You can get more than two hundred different ones at a Wellington place = 55km from here. Pudney & Lee Ltd, 401 Hutt Road, Petone, NEW ZEALAND. They also sell brandnew 78rpm needles from Dunedee. Ross -----Original Message----- From: Tim Bovard <tmbovard@earthlink.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, March 01, 2002 12:52 PM Subject: Re: vinyl     >Hi, List! > >There's at least *one* more person here that is firmly convinced of the >merits of LP recordings...I've often said that they can come up with all >the new whiz-bang "better-and-better" systems/formats/mediums that they >want to (and I'll judge each on its merits when the time comes) but in = the >meantime, you'll pry my turntable outta my cold, dead fingers!! <lol> > >I don't have the huge collection (Ross, Paul) of LP's *yet*, but I'm >working on it... ;-) I routinely find interesting "treasures" (of every >flavor!) in the record bins at a couple of local thrift stores. Usually >for less than a buck a piece. EBay is also a good source these days, but >you're likely to pay a bit more. Lots and lots of organ LPs on there at >any given time. (it all depends on *just* how badly you want that George >Montalba album...) > >While we're out here near the fringes of topicality <lol>, anyone got an >infallible source for good cheap replacement stylii? > >Cheers, > >Tim >(who'd love to hear more about that Sony laser-record-reader = thingie...did >they ever make it to production?) > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: RE: Hips swaying in time to the music From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 21:22:53 -0600   Well, I don't have many problems - it was just so much fun to entertain the troops. My hip and other aches are generally the aggravation of my arthritis from my Saturday activities on the farm, not from anything on the organ bench. I should have been Jewish, so that I could do organ at church on Saturdays, and farm work on Sundays, instead of the other way around.   I finally learned after law school that it is sometimes better to be struck by a car when you are in a car yourself, than it is to be struck as a pedestrian!   Driving offensively, I remain,   Glenda Sutton          
(back) Subject: Re: vinyl From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Fri, 1 Mar 2002 00:26:48 EST     --part1_17f.45c339f.29b06b18_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I thought I had a good collection, but mine is only 8' high. Lee   --part1_17f.45c339f.29b06b18_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I thought I had a good = collection, but mine is only 8' high. &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_17f.45c339f.29b06b18_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: vinyl From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Fri, 01 Mar 2002 00:52:14 -0500   You shouldn't stack 'em that high, Lee. The Dust on the records will get pressed into the grooves. I lost an E.P. Biggs & a Ken Griffin in the stack, that way.   Vertical storage is best.   Stan   Vinyl may be the longest lasting media.       Chicaleee@aol.com wrote: > > I thought I had a good collection, but mine is only 8' high. Lee