PipeChat Digest #2736 - Wednesday, March 6, 2002
 
Re: chiming in
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: chiming in
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: chiming in
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Pipes and Pizza Information
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
Re: chiming in / harpers harping on their harps
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Pipes and Pizza Information
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Lutheran Book of Worship
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: chiming in
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Lutheran Book of Worship
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
Re: Lutheran Book of Worship
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Lutheran Book of Worship
  by "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Lutheran Book of Worship
  by "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net>
Re: Lutheran Book of Worship
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Lutheran Book of Worship
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
Re: Pipes and Pizza Information
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Lutheran Book of Worship
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Lutheran Book of Worship
  by "Randy Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Lutheran Book of Worship
  by <Pepehomer@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: chiming in From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 09:03:57 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3098250237_75505_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit   on 3/5/02 5:24 PM, Cremona502@cs.com at Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   Sowerby's "Carillon" immediately leaps to mind since it is beautiful and uses both harp and chimes. John Holler has a book of organ music with chimes.   Another suggestion.... just be creative and try familiar pieces that = you've played and just add the harp as though it was just another stop, and the chimes next time you need a melody stop. It's amazing how often these two percussions can be used, as long as you're not overly concerned with authenticity.     Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely >   Thanks, Bruce. I have the Sowerby already, but didn't know about the Holler. I'll be able to get it through my university library. Looks like fun!     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu       --MS_Mac_OE_3098250237_75505_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: chiming in</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> on 3/5/02 5:24 PM, Cremona502@cs.com at Cremona502@cs.com wrote:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2">Sowerby's &quot;Carillon&quot; immediately = leaps=3D to mind since it is beautiful and uses both harp and chimes. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&n=3D bsp;John Holler has a book of organ music with chimes. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> Another suggestion.... just be creative and try familiar pieces that = you've=3D played and just add the harp as though it was just another stop, and the = ch=3D imes next time you need a melody stop. &nbsp;It's amazing how often these = tw=3D o percussions can be used, as long as you're not overly concerned with = authe=3D nticity. <BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com &gt;<I> <BR> </I>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ &quot;&quot;Haruffaroo, = B=3D ohawow!&quot; <BR> Visit Howling Acres <I> </I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: &nbsp;Duncan, = Miles=3D , Molly &amp; Dewi <BR> &lt; http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + = http://prepaidlegal.com/go/bruce=3D cornely &nbsp;&gt;</FONT> <BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> Thanks, Bruce. &nbsp;I have the Sowerby already, but didn't know about the = =3D Holler. &nbsp;I'll be able to get it through my university library. = &nbsp;Lo=3D oks like fun!<BR> <BR> <BR> Randy Runyon<BR> Music Director<BR> Zion Lutheran Church<BR> Hamilton, Ohio<BR> runyonr@muohio.edu<BR> <BR> </BODY> </HTML>     --MS_Mac_OE_3098250237_75505_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: Re: chiming in From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 09:08:48 -0400   on 3/5/02 4:39 PM, Berley Antoine Firmin II at FIRMAN1@prodigy.net wrote:   > You might peruse the music published in perforated roll format for the > Aeolian Pipe Organ. A "rollography" book I have contains all of the = rolls > issued, the ones for use with Harp or Chimes being designated so. Then = just > look for the sheet music! > BAF II > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >   Thanks, but I'm a little confused. Do you mean that there exists a book = of sheet music in which player organ rolls have been transcribed into musical notation? If so, can you supply the title?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: chiming in From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 09:10:11 -0400   on 3/5/02 1:17 PM, Robert Lind at Robert_Lind@cch.com wrote:   > Leo Sowerby's Carillon needs chimes (that can be coupled to the pedal, = IIRC) > and harp (and celesta), and benefits from Vox Humana and any number of > slushy strings/celestes. He wrote the piece when he was 22. Good > late-Romantic piece. > > Robert Lind > Yes, it is indeed a delightful piece. I didn't know he was so young when = he wrote it. I have the Vox Humana plus some slushy celestes, plus chimes = and harp, so I should enjoy playing it on my organ.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes and Pizza Information From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 09:11:51 EST   Could you send this list of sites to us too??? merry   > Van says: > > I was in charge of handouts and packets last year at our Pipe Organ = Encounter. > > I used photos, stoplists and diagrams, but the handout they were most = interested in was a handout I put together called : "Organs, Organists and = the Internet." > > I included : > > Organs from the State > > Organs from the US > > Organs from the rest of the world > > Organists from Texas Web sites > > Organists from the US Web sites > > Organists from the rest of the world Web sites > > Pipe Organ Information ( There are some wonderful sites with moving = objects) > > Pipe Organ Builders > > Electronic Organ Companies Web Sites (they are here to stay folks) > > > > The kids couldn't wait to get home and check all this stuff out. > > > > Van Vanpool, Organist > > FUMC, Bowie, Texas      
(back) Subject: Re: chiming in / harpers harping on their harps From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 09:31:19 -0400   on 3/5/02 1:06 PM, quilisma@socal.rr.com at quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > Schulmerich commissioned a collection pieces for organ and their carillon= /harp > ... some were rather interesting ... I'm sure it's long out of print, but= you > might be able to find it in a large library ... it might be adaptable to > regular organ chimes and harp. >=20 > I think Lorenz still publishes one or more collections for organ and chim= es; I > can't think of any COLLECTIONS of pieces that call for the harp, just > scattered compositions here and there ... let me see if I can remember a = few > of them: Thanks, Bud, for the great suggestions. In my copy of the Dupr=E9/Faur=E9 In paradisum the sixteenth notes are not registered for harp but I'm sure it works beautifully that way. The Bach/Gounod is a great idea: I'll do it the next wedding I have. I have the Dubois Cantilene Nuptiale and the Fletcher Fountain Reverie, and (I think) the Yon. In other words, I have lots of music where harp will work well, just didn't realize it.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes and Pizza Information From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 09:37:22 -0800   >Could you send this list of sites to us too??? >merry > >> Van says: >> >> I was in charge of handouts and packets last year at our Pipe >>Organ Encounter. >> > > I used photos, stoplists and diagrams, but the handout they were >most interested in was a handout I put together called : "Organs, >Organists and the Internet."   YES!! Me too!   John V  
(back) Subject: Lutheran Book of Worship From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 09:36:46 -0400   To any Lutheran musicians out there: What is it with the Lutheran Book of Worship? I mean, why are so many of the hymns written in such an eccentric style, suitable perhaps as an alternate harmonization for a last verse, but rather wearing on the ears when played for more than one verse? They are traps for the unwary. I = have learned (when I can remember to do it) to be ready to play out of other hymnals, and to copy parts out of the latter for my four-piece brass choir who usually play along at our second service.   Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: chiming in From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2002 09:42:35 EST   I seem to recall hearing the Sowerby Carillon done at National City = Christian in Washington and using the handbells that are mounted with the gallery = organ.   On another occasion one of our dear departed AGO members did his part of a =   group recital there in theatre style. No one will ever forget hearing = those same handbells in "Someday My Prince Will Come."   And in the deeply cobwebbed recesses of my memory I also seem to recall hearing the Bells of St. Anne de Beaupre at Riverside, possibly by Fred = Swann during the AGO convention? He also (I think) did a Seth Bingham piece, possibly Bells of Riverside? I think the theme comes from a Wagner ditty = that is played (or was played) as part of chiming the hour on the Riverside carillon.   If I am merely delirious and inadvertently making up all this, my sincere apologies!   DudelK Washington, DC  
(back) Subject: Re: Lutheran Book of Worship From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2002 06:51:24 -0800 (PST)   I have encountered the same problem. It is interesting that the hymnal avoids sevenths like the plague. If a hymn is played as written in the Lutheran Hymnal, it sounds as mechanical as an IBM punch machine.     --- Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote: > To any Lutheran musicians out there: > What is it with the Lutheran Book of Worship? I > mean, why are so many > of the hymns written in such an eccentric style, > suitable perhaps as an > alternate harmonization for a last verse, but rather > wearing on the ears > when played for more than one verse? They are traps > for the unwary. I have > learned (when I can remember to do it) to be ready > to play out of other > hymnals, and to copy parts out of the latter for my > four-piece brass choir > who usually play along at our second service. > > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D D. Keith Morgan, RPT Pipe Organ & Piano Service 400 Conditt Circle Denton, Texas 76209-4861 (940) 382-0348 (940) 367-1178 (Cell) dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Try FREE Yahoo! Mail - the world's greatest free email! http://mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Lutheran Book of Worship From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2002 10:06:30 -0500   Dear Randy and List,   I played in an ELCA church for a couple of years, and never was able to make friends with the Green Thing. One thing that really rankled was the almost complete lack of any Bach chorale harmonizations, all replaced with something new and wonderful (not!), and usually not meant or able to be sung in harmony. There was a supplement published at some point, with actual "replacement parts" for quite a number of the hymns, restoring the elegant original harmonizations that had stood the test of time, AND could be enjoyed by choirs and also by any congregants who could sing harmony. A handy feature of that collection was its use of the same hymn numbering as in the Green Thing. It pains me that I cannot tell you the name of this useful book, published in a sturdy paper binding, but I believe the sentiment was something like Hymns for Singing in Harmony, or something like that. I hope this is still around and that you can locate it.   Good luck,   Malcolm Wechsler - certified member of the Anti-Green Party www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, March 06, 2002 8:36 AM Subject: Lutheran Book of Worship     > To any Lutheran musicians out there: > What is it with the Lutheran Book of Worship? I mean, why are so many > of the hymns written in such an eccentric style, suitable perhaps as an > alternate harmonization for a last verse, but rather wearing on the ears > when played for more than one verse? They are traps for the unwary. I have > learned (when I can remember to do it) to be ready to play out of other > hymnals, and to copy parts out of the latter for my four-piece brass choir > who usually play along at our second service. > > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu        
(back) Subject: Re: Lutheran Book of Worship From: "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 10:14:33 -0600   Randolph Runyon wrote: > To any Lutheran musicians out there:   > What is it with the Lutheran Book of Worship? I mean, why are so = many > of the hymns written in such an eccentric style, suitable perhaps as an > alternate harmonization for a last verse, but rather wearing on the ears > when played for more than one verse?   Two words:   PAUL BUNJES!!!   He was one of these people who had some kind of mission (maybe he thought from God!) to take virtually EVERY Hymn and do *something* to it. I think it was a mis-guided effort for Lutherans to shake the "stuffed-shirt" imagery it touted for so long, but they went too far. Indeed there are/were Hymns that needed *SOMEthing* done to them, but to change them simply for the sake of change was taking it too far. This was especially jarring when Hymns that had familiar words that everyone had known by heart were "revised" and everyone got confused and kept singing the "old" words.   Sad to say: It was one of the things that made me glad that I chose to build organs, rather than to try to do the Organist thing.   Faithfully,   Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: Re: Lutheran Book of Worship From: "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 11:16:51 -0500   It seemed to me as if the hymnal committee was determined that no tune would remain as it was in the previous hymnal. Every tune was altered, and =   the harmonization was always what one would not expect for the tune. They =   certainly went out of their way to make the hymns different for no = apparent reason, They assuredly didn't improve a one of the tunes.   Look at the names of the hymnal committee and you will see the offending "composers". And unfortunately, the same group is at work right now on doing it again.   Who is to stop them?   Paul R. Swank Organist/Choirmaster (Retired) ELCA and LC-MS Churches     At 10:06 AM 3/6/02, you wrote: >Dear Randy and List, > >I played in an ELCA church for a couple of years, and never was able to >make friends with the Green Thing. One thing that really rankled was the >almost complete lack of any Bach chorale harmonizations, all replaced >with something new and wonderful (not!), and usually not meant or able >to be sung in harmony. There was a supplement published at some point, >with actual "replacement parts" for quite a number of the hymns, >restoring the elegant original harmonizations that had stood the test of >time, AND could be enjoyed by choirs and also by any congregants who >could sing harmony. A handy feature of that collection was its use of >the same hymn numbering as in the Green Thing. It pains me that I cannot >tell you the name of this useful book, published in a sturdy paper >binding, but I believe the sentiment was something like Hymns for >Singing in Harmony, or something like that. I hope this is still around >and that you can locate it. > >Good luck, > >Malcolm Wechsler - certified member of the Anti-Green Party >www.mander-organs.com > >----- Original Message ----- >From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> >To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Sent: Wednesday, March 06, 2002 8:36 AM >Subject: Lutheran Book of Worship > > > > To any Lutheran musicians out there: > > What is it with the Lutheran Book of Worship? I mean, why are so >many > > of the hymns written in such an eccentric style, suitable perhaps as >an > > alternate harmonization for a last verse, but rather wearing on the >ears > > when played for more than one verse? They are traps for the unwary. >I have > > learned (when I can remember to do it) to be ready to play out of >other > > hymnals, and to copy parts out of the latter for my four-piece brass >choir > > who usually play along at our second service. > > > > > > Randy Runyon > > Music Director > > Zion Lutheran Church > > Hamilton, Ohio > > runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Lutheran Book of Worship From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2002 11:31:24 EST   Hi Richard:   Now I've heard everything! Not only did Paul Bunjes mess with organs and foul things up, now the hymn books? This is way too much. He should have stuck to teaching skulls full of mush. Why did people listen to this man? :) I have a solution for the hymn books though, use the old tunes from the previous hymnal and the old words. It might be messy but hymnals of local church manufacture, by liturgical season might work. The hymns would certainly be in the public domain. That might put a stop to the hymnal tampering you describe. Traditional missalettes? If they don't sell hymnals then they'd have to close shop, right? Just a thought.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Lutheran Book of Worship From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2002 11:22:58 -0600   I give up, Paul--I've perused the Introduction to the LBW and can't find any names mentioned. Most "hymnals" list the names of compilers, but the LBW is strangely anonymous. What is this "hymnal committee" to which = you refer? Is it found in LW, as opposed to LBW?   Bob Lind Good Shepherd Lutheran, Naperville, IL       From: "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net> on 03/06/2002 10:16 AM Please respond to PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org>@SMTP@cchntmsd To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org>@SMTP@cchntmsd cc:   Subject: Re: Lutheran Book of Worship   It seemed to me as if the hymnal committee was determined that no tune would remain as it was in the previous hymnal. Every tune was altered, and the harmonization was always what one would not expect for the tune. They certainly went out of their way to make the hymns different for no apparent reason, They assuredly didn't improve a one of the tunes.   Look at the names of the hymnal committee and you will see the offending "composers". And unfortunately, the same group is at work right now on doing it again.   Who is to stop them?   Paul R. Swank Organist/Choirmaster (Retired) ELCA and LC-MS Churches    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes and Pizza Information From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2002 12:15:25 -0600   At 8:41 AM -0500 3/6/02, CdyVanpool@aol.com wrote: >Van says: >I was in charge of handouts and packets last year at our Pipe Organ = Encounter. >I used photos, stoplists and diagrams, but the handout they were >most interested in was a handout I put together called : "Organs, >Organists and the Internet." >I included : >Organs from the State >Organs from the US >Organs from the rest of the world >Organists from Texas Web sites >Organists from the US Web sites >Organists from the rest of the world Web sites >Pipe Organ Information ( There are some wonderful sites with moving = objects) >Pipe Organ Builders >Electronic Organ Companies Web Sites (they are here to stay folks) > >The kids couldn't wait to get home and check all this stuff out.   Van   If you would be so kind as to send this to me I will put it on the Chapter Web site were others can also get it.   Thanks   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Lutheran Book of Worship From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 13:32:54 -0500   The conflated roster of the various committees of the ILCW = (Inter-Lutheran Commission on Worship) is found in LBW pew edition, pp.922-3. There were four committees: = Liturgical Texts, Liturgical Music, Hymn Texts, Hymn Tunes. I was privileged to serve on Hymn Texts. = Each committee had three members from each of the three judicatories that created the ILCW: LCA, = ALC, LCMS.   As to Paul Swank's assertion that the "the same group is at work right now = on doing it again," I'd say that at this point in time, we ILCW members are "damned few, and = they're all daid." :-) Not quite all, perhaps, but we are in or near retirement. Anyway, the ELCA's = worship thrust seems in quite another direction from where we were in the 70s. Perhaps = understandably so. Don't know where LCMS is, in this regard.   Periodically, the two hymn committees met in joint session to share our = separate deliberations, with sometimes serious challenges to text and tune choices. There was also = controversy over unison- vs. part-singing on hymns. Some cited Bonh=F6ffer's theological position that = unison singing expressed the Church as the Body (singular) of Christ; but many members of Scandinavian = background defended part-singing as traditional for them (I remember Lee Sateren getting quite = worked up about it.) I guess the results are mixed in LBW.   As to the Bach chorale settings, I recall the "tune people" citing = research that said harmonizations from his choral works did not extend to congregational use then. I believe = Vaughan Williams, for one, vehemently agreed. What's the current judgment on that? Another part = of this is the rhythmic vs. iso-rhythmic forms of the chorales. LCMS favored the former.   The LBW was a product of its time. Hymnic revolution was in the air. = Elizabethan pronouns were suspect, etc. LBW was not as radical about language as some books, notably = the Presbyterian's Worship Book. I recall that we "text people" drew the line at about 1850: = English texts written before then would usually keep the thees and thous, but after 1850 could = be 'modernized.' The translations from other tongues brought up the matter of faithfulness to = at least the spirit of the original, if not always the letter. We had some thirty pages of existing = translations of Ein' feste Burg. In the end, Joel Lundeen and Jerry Vajda did a new one, working from = Luther's German. Others ("Cathy" Winkworth, et al) were sometimes altered, for better or worse. = The fact is, editorial "tinkering" with hymns, tunes, and their 'marriages' has been de rigeur = ever since the first committee-edited hymnal in English, HA&M 1861.   There were pressures to include this or that, e.g., How great thou art, = with its astronomical license fee from Manna Music. The book could only be so thick to fit = standard pew racks, etc., etc., blah, blah, not to mention judicatory politics.   I've used LBW for all its nearly 24 years. I try to understand its = shortcomings and rejoice in its inclusion of new (to us) material, e.g., Pratt Green's hymns, tunes like = Abbots Leigh, etc.   Enough. This is getting off-topic and parochial, I know. Sorry.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Lutheran Book of Worship From: "Randy Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2002 14:03:55 -0500   > > >...There were pressures to include this or that, e.g., How great >thou art, with its astronomical >license fee from Manna Music. ... > >Stan Yoder >Pittsburgh   Thanks, Stan, for your informative and thoughtful reply. I was hoping there would be someone out there who had worked on the hymnal--though in your case, on the text, not the harmonizations. Interesting about "How Great...". Given that it's a Swedish folksong translated from Swedish to Russian and then to German and then to English, or something like that, how is it that Manna has a copyright claim on it anyway? Shouldn't someone go back to the original Swedish text and offer us a fresh English translation--or has that already been done?   Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu Music Director Zion Lutheran Church, Hamilton, Ohio  
(back) Subject: Re: Lutheran Book of Worship From: <Pepehomer@aol.com> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2002 15:13:23 EST   Ah, finally, something that we can all agree on...   After spending the first 13 years of my life with the "old" red hymnal, I = moved with my family to the church I am currently with that has the evil = green monster. My absolute favorite parts of this hymnal:   1. "Jesus, Savior, Pilot Me" - HORRIBLE for trying to accompany a = congregation. I actually had people come up to me seriously asking if I = was okay, or if I was just having an off day. 2. "When peace, like a river" - known to the rest of the world as "It is = well with my soul" - however, they forgot to include the chorus. Someone = in editing should have caught this... or be shot. 3. The liturgies - nothing like having a singing part that is different = from the accompaniment, and the hymnal only having the singing line. I = guess everyone can just be trusted to sight-read.   That's my tirade for now. I could go on, but you all can't possibly have = that much time to read it all.   Justin Karch Organist, Holy Tinity LCMS Rome, GA