PipeChat Digest #2743 - Sunday, March 10, 2002
 
Oldest pipes?
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Oldest pipes?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
March 18 event
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: March 18 event
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: Oldest pipes?
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Oldest pipes?
  by "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl>
RE: New to PipeChat...
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net>
Re: March 18 event
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
RE: New to PipeChat...
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
St. Agatha's and other organic stuff (REALLY LONG)
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Oldest pipes?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Music search - York Bowen
  by <Doubltrump@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Oldest pipes? From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 06:52:55 -0600   I am in the process of reading Stephen Bicknell's "The English Organ", and the question came to me. Where and in what instrument is the oldest known partial or full rank of extant working pipes? What is their condition and sound like?   Glenda Sutton            
(back) Subject: Re: Oldest pipes? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 06:58:10 -0600   I think probably that the oldest working pipes are in the organ of circa 1390 at Sion in Switzerland, the world's oldest working pipe organ. The voicing is pretty much unrestrained open toe voicing, and the instrument produces quite a volume of sound even in the large building.   John Speller   Glenda wrote: > > I am in the process of reading Stephen Bicknell's "The English Organ", > and the question came to me. Where and in what instrument is the oldest > known partial or full rank of extant working pipes? What is their > condition and sound like?    
(back) Subject: March 18 event From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 11:40:55 -0500   Worcester Chapter AGO   Monday March 18 at 6:30pm at Holy Cross College Chapel, Worcester, a lecture by DANIEL ZARETSKY, organist from Saint Petersburg, Russia, who will present a talk on organ music in Russia. At 8pm Mr. Zaretsky will give an Organ Concert on the 1985 Taylor & Boody = 4 manual tracker pipe organ. Admission is free. Co-sponsored with Holy Cross College.  
(back) Subject: Re: March 18 event From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 17:25:11 -0000   Before I pack my bags and try to attend this event, can you confirm 'your' Worcester as Worcestershire UK ?   Harry   -----Original Message----- From: Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com> To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 10 March 2002 16:31 Subject: March 18 event     >Worcester Chapter AGO > >Monday March 18 at 6:30pm at Holy Cross College Chapel, Worcester, a >lecture by DANIEL ZARETSKY, organist from Saint Petersburg, Russia, who >will present a talk on organ music in Russia. >At 8pm Mr. Zaretsky will give an Organ Concert on the 1985 Taylor & Boody = 4 >manual tracker pipe organ. >Admission is free. Co-sponsored with Holy Cross College. > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Oldest pipes? From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 11 Mar 2002 07:03:19 +1300   I wonder if they are the organ in St Valery, Sion, Switzerland, built in 1384 or thereabouts? Ross -----Original Message----- From: Glenda <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> To: PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu>; pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Monday, March 11, 2002 1:53 AM Subject: Oldest pipes?     >I am in the process of reading Stephen Bicknell's "The English Organ", >and the question came to me. Where and in what instrument is the oldest >known partial or full rank of extant working pipes? What is their >condition and sound like? > >Glenda Sutton > > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Oldest pipes? From: "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 18:51:51 +0100 (CET)       Could somebody desciribe a disposition of the organ at Sion?   Marek   On Sun, 10 Mar 2002, Glenda wrote:   > I am in the process of reading Stephen Bicknell's "The English Organ", > and the question came to me. Where and in what instrument is the oldest > known partial or full rank of extant working pipes? What is their > condition and sound like? > > Glenda Sutton > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: RE: New to PipeChat... From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 13:07:29 -0600   There are probably quite a few of us from the Chicago area lurking about here.   There are a number of churches with outstanding music around these parts. Depending on the style you're into, you might try:   Episcopal   Church of the Ascension St. Luke (Evanston)   Roman Catholic   Cathedral of the Holy Name St. John Cantius St. Clement   Protestant   Fourth Presbyterian Church St. Luke Lutheran (on Belmont Ave.)   Chicago is indeed fortunate to have somewhere between five and a hundred chapters of the AGO - depending on who gets a bug up their behind to go = off and start another chapter. There is only one chapter of the Organ Historical Society. Both the OHS and Chicago AGO are sponsoring an organ crawl of instruments on the south side next Saturday.   Other organic things in the near future include a recital by Daniel Roth = of Saint Sulpice this afternoon at 5 PM at St Luke in Evanston.   As far as the Bull Rondo, I'm not certain of the "Nyquist variation" you refer to but Morning Star recently re-issued the (in)famous Richard Ellsasser knock off. For years he said that he "arranged" the piece when it's actually something he cobbled together himself. It's not terribly difficult and any dealer should be able to get it for you. It's in the Morning Star catalog as MSM-10-958 Ellsasser, Richard Rondo (attributed to John Bull)   That should keep you busy.   Michael   ps - a couple of housekeeping requests - could you please set your e-mail program to send messages in plain text? Those of us who read the Digest version of PipeChat read the original message in plain text and then have = to wade through an html translation of the same message which is twice as = long. If you do that and also snip large chunks of any message you respond to = will make digest life a lot simpler here in Evanston. Thanks      
(back) Subject: Re: March 18 event From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 13:53:13 -0600     Judy A. Ollikkala wrote, in part:     > Worcester Chapter AGO > > Monday March 18 at 6:30pm at Holy Cross College Chapel, Worcester, a > lecture by DANIEL ZARETSKY, organist from Saint Petersburg, Russia, who > will present a talk on organ music in Russia.   MusicMan wrote:   > Before I pack my bags and try to attend this event, can you confirm = 'your' > Worcester as Worcestershire UK ?   'Fraid not. The "AGO" denotes this as in the U.S.; were it in = Worcestershire, UK, the sponsoring organization would be RCO, rather than AGO...   ns    
(back) Subject: RE: New to PipeChat... From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 14:06:38 -0600   At 1:07 PM -0600 3/10/02, Michael David wrote: >Chicago is indeed fortunate to have somewhere between five and a hundred >chapters of the AGO - depending on who gets a bug up their behind to go = off >and start another chapter. There is only one chapter of the Organ >Historical Society. Both the OHS and Chicago AGO are sponsoring an organ >crawl of instruments on the south side next Saturday.   Dennis   WELCOME to PipeChat from an alumnus of DePaul's School of Music and a former Organist/Choirmaster at St. Vincent DePaul Church (The University Church). In case you don't know it, there is a historic organ at that church, a 1901 Lyon and Healy that is currently in the process of getting a new console plus having some other work done on it to restore it.   I don't know about the AGO Chapters in the Chicago area, Jerome Butera who was mentioned in a previous posting and who is on the Faculty of the School of Music should be able to give you some direction about the various Chapters.   As Michael pointed out above, there is a very active Chapter of the Organ Historical Society, probably one of the most active Chapters of the OHS in the country. Besides doing the organ crawl next weekend they are also preparing for the 47th Annual Convention of the OHS being held in Chicago this summer. The dates for it are June 25 through July 1 and the tentative schedule is posted on the OHS Web Site at: http://www.organsociety.org You should try to attend as there are many very fine organs in the area that are going to be heard during the convention. And you should really join the OHS Chapter there.   Best wishes and hopefully I will get a chance to meet you in Chicago this summer during the Convention.   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: St. Agatha's and other organic stuff (REALLY LONG) From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 14:47:26 -0600   St. Agatha's Episcopal Church DeFuniak Springs, Florida Lent 4, Year A   Rite I - service music Merbecke   Prelude: My young life hath an end - Jan Pieter Sweelinck (1562 - 1621) Allegretto from Sonata IV and Preludium II - Felix Mendelssohn (1809 - 1847) Processional Hymn - Thou, whose almighty word (Moscow) - H 371 Sequence Hymn - I want to walk as a child of the light (Houston) - H 490 Offertory Hymn - The King of love my shepherd is (St. Columba) - H 645 Music during Communion: Prelude on New Britain - Dale Wood My Shepherd will supply my need (Resignation; text H 664) Closing Hymn - Amazing grace! How sweet the (New Britain) - H 671 Dismissal There will be no postlude during Lent.   Music was selected for its Lenten nature and harmony with today's readings, and in honor of Mendelssohn's birthday February 3.   After a self-enforced hiatus from posting and a little encouragement from a friend, I decided to get back on the internet to let you know the organic stuff that has been going on, and the questions raised in my feeble mind, because I know there are answers out there.   Firstly, a couple of weeks ago we had a visitor in church, who happened to be visiting the Chautauqua Assembly with his wife, a travel writer. He introduced himself after church as a retired Methodist minister, a degree holder in both Musicology and Theology, and teacher at Texas A&M medical school. I am sorry to say I cannot remember his name (I'm terrible with names unless they are written down).   Anyway, he told me how impressed he was with the tiny organ, and that he had the opportunity to play it the day before after the Chautauqua event held in the church. I invited him to sit down and play some more. He played a very striking and interesting contrapuntal, perhaps fugal, piece that I should know, but do not (so was ashamed to ask). Although it was Bach-ish in nature, it was not any Bach I knew, and the pedal part ascended by thirds. The piece was in D minor or A minor (again, my memory fails). Does this description strike a chord of recognition with anyone?   Last Saturday night a friend and I traveled to Pensacola Christian College to see Diane Bish in the flesh. She was performing the inaugural concert at their new Allen 4-manual digital thingy in their hall, called the Crowne Center. Her program:   Toccata on "Christ the Lord" - Bish Five Flute Clocks - Haydn Toccata in F major - Bach Bolero de Concert - Lefebure-Wely Carillon de Westminster - Vierne Intermission Jubilation Suite (4 movements) - Gordon Young Two hymn improvisations: (Bish) Come, thou fount Amazing Grace Nimrod from Enigma Variations - Elgar Toccata from Symphony V - Widor   Now I must tell you, I was utterly impressed. There is money at this place! This hall was state-of-the-art, holds over 6,000 people, and almost every seat is a good one. The placed was packed. A fellow AGO chapter member teaches there, and said that there were 306 audio speakers hidden, and 144 (?) organ speakers (in the walls, ceiling, etc.). The sound was OK, not nearly as loud and obnoxious as I would have imagined at tuttissimo. My friend stated that several "auxiliaries" were not on. There was a large screen over the stage whereby the production guys could zoom in on the Bish's hands and feet.   I read up on the school via internet once I got home. The school is Independent Baptist, and while not shunning charismatics and hyper-Calvinists gently dissuades them. The school apparently tries to stay in mid-stream fundamentalism and makes no bones that it does not appeal to all. It is apparently mandatory for the students to attend events at the auditorium, which is also used as a chapel and church. These students were dressed in the loveliest gowns and suits - I hadn't seen so much sequins, velvet, brocade, and chiffon since my prom days! Some had flowers, many were taking pictures of each other, and they were all friendly and well-behaved, knew when to clap, and all that. While I was wearing a not-inexpensive and conservative evening suit, I felt under-dressed. This was the first organ recital for about one-half of the concert goers, and Diane did a superb job of explaining the organ, the bells, whistles, manuals, and sounds. And I managed to sit through the last piece without throwing up on anyone.   Regarding today, I picked conservative (there's that word again!) Mendelssohn, since I am not doing postludes. The Allegretto always reminds me of the New York AGO convention and John Stansell's class on Mendelssohn. While I used to chafe while watching other attorneys in court, wanting to take it away from them and do it myself, I have only felt that way twice with organists - once in a John Obetz master class, and once in NYC. A volunteer in Stansell's class did the Allegretto. Because of the crush of bodies at the hotel, I had given up on getting my music and organ shoes from my room for the class, and because I was stuck in the elevator missed the bus to the event. I ended up hailing a cab rather than waiting with the group for the next bus. I had just discovered Mendelssohn, and didn't want to show my ignorance in front of these other organists. But I wanted so badly to push this guy off the bench and show him how it is done.   I wonder if there are other tasteful and more classically inclined arrangements of New Britain/Amazing Grace out there.   I know that Rick is trying to kill me off now - yesterday he wanted to teach me how to DRIVE the Harley. Although the lesson went well, the 700-lb. bike won, and I have a huge bruise (the size of a grapefruit) on the left foreleg to prove it. Last night I felt like I had dug ditches and spread cow manure all day.   Have bitten off an ambitious amount to learn and play (for me and my abilities) for the season - finally learned the "O mensch, bewein'" for next week (inspired by Felix and listening carefully to Hurford's rendition), was hoping to have the Rheinberger Sonata No. 2 ready but don't know, am pulling out my Brahms' Passion Chorale and Purvis' first of the Four Prayers in Tone for Palm Sunday, and am trying like heck to learn "In dir est Freud", and Malcolm's suggestion, "Heut' Triumphiret Gottes Sohn", as well dusting off my favorite "Christ Lag in Todesbanden" for Easter. A Bach-ian time for all, misspellings and all.   Greetings on a chilly windy Sunday in the Panhandle,   Glenda Sutton                      
(back) Subject: Re: Oldest pipes? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 15:17:00 -0600   Marek Miskowicz wrote: > Could somebody desciribe a disposition of the organ at Sion?   The case and painted doors go back to the original instrument of circa 1380 to 1400. The 4' and 2' Octave and 1.1/3' Quint Minor stops are original fourteenth-century pipework. The exact date the organ was built is not known, but it is first recorded as already existing in 1433. The mechanism and the rest of the pipework date from the 1718 rebuild of the instrument by Matthias Carlen, who added the pedals.   Manual: C - c''' (*)   8' Principal C-B wood, rest metal (facade) 4' Octave C-F grooved to Coppel, rest metal (original) 4' Coppel stopped wood 2' Octave metal (original) 2.2/3' Quint Major C-F grooved to 1.1/3', metal 1.1/3' Quint Minor metal (original) 1' Mixtur II metal C-a# 22-26 b-b' 19-22 c''-c''' 15-19   Pedal: C - c' (*)   16' + 8' Gedackt stopped wood   (* short octaves in bass)   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Music search - York Bowen From: <Doubltrump@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 16:29:17 EST     Music Search- York Bowen Fantasia Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 6:41:09 AM Eastern Standard Time From: Doubltrump To: pipechat@pipechat.org   Dear List-   I am searching for the following piece, publisher or any information if = you know of it in an anthology.   Fantasia, op. 136 by York Bowen (his only organ work)   Many Thanks,   Tom White Bridgehampton, NY