PipeChat Digest #2748 - Wednesday, March 13, 2002
 
Re: Good advise Ron, here's more
  by "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com>
RE: Dobson Website
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Dobson Website
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
RE: Dobson Website
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Trends in color and finish of pipes
  by "Michael K. Cronin" <mcronin@iag.net>
Trends in color and finish of pipes
  by "Michael K. Cronin" <mcronin@iag.net>
RE: Trends in color and finish of pipes
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
liturgical question for the church dedication (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Trends in color and finish of pipes
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Trends in color and finish of pipes
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Wicks Website
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net>
Re: liturgical question for the church dedication (X-posted)
  by "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
Re: liturgical question for the church dedication (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Remembering Ruth Plummer
  by <AFberlin3@aol.com>
Re: Remembering Ruth Plummer
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Ruth Plummer X-posting
  by <AFberlin3@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Good advise Ron, here's more From: "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 04:41:02 -0800 (PST)   Though in the original instrumental version, I've never heard a recording played a la notes inegal. Actually, the problem is that when most organists play in this style, they sound like they have a terrible sense of rhythm. Also, keep in mind that not every piece in French baroque should be played in this fashion. --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Hi Wayne: > > I use the dotted eights in French period 17th-18th > Centuries to > approximate the practice of ineqalis hope I spelled > that right. > It adds a lot more snap to the music. Rondeau by > Moret comes > to mind. Here you dot the first 1/8 note and play > the second one > in the series as a 1/16th. This remains consistant > throughout the > series of 1/8th notes. > > Ron > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Try FREE Yahoo! Mail - the world's greatest free email! http://mail.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: RE: Dobson Website From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 09:03:07 -0500   I have just looked at the site and think it is a good site. I have a question, however, why is there no CCCC# in the Pedal Bourdon 32' stop on the organ of St. Lukes Episcopal Church, Kalamazoo, MI, Opus 57, 1992? Robert Colasacco   -----Original Message----- From: Panning [mailto:jpanning@cal-net.net] Sent: Tuesday, March 12, 2002 8:12 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Dobson Website     Dear Pipechatters,   I'm pleased to announce a substantial revision to our company website. In addition to new material (including installation photos of our projects in Los Angeles and Philadelphia), the structure of the site has been tightened up and navigation has been simplified.   http://www.dobsonorgan.com   John A. Panning Dobson Pipe Organ Builders Lake City, Iowa   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Dobson Website From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 09:35:33 EST     --part1_111.ec70826.29c0bdb5_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/13/02 2:03:20 PM !!!First Boot!!!, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes:     > I have a question, however, why is there no CCCC# in the Pedal Bourdon = 32' > stop on the organ of St. Lukes Episcopal Church, Kalamazoo, MI, Opus 57, =   > 1992? > Probably couldn't afford it. Maybe they should have a little collection bowl and everyone who finds the note needful can drop in a quarter. Then = in ten years or so they can.....     buy a coke!! ;-)     Leaving off C# in the lowest octave was a way of saving space and money in =   "olden times." Still makes sense! ;-)     Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & = Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely >   --part1_111.ec70826.29c0bdb5_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/13/02 2:03:20 PM !!!First Boot!!!, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> I have a = question, however, why is there no CCCC# in the Pedal Bourdon 32' stop on = the organ of St. Lukes Episcopal Church, Kalamazoo, MI, Opus 57, 1992? <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Probably couldn't afford it. &nbsp;&nbsp;Maybe = they should have a little collection bowl and everyone who finds the note = needful can drop in a quarter. &nbsp;&nbsp;Then in ten years or so they = can..... <BR> <BR> <BR>buy a coke!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR> <BR>Leaving off C# in the lowest octave was a way of saving space and = money in "olden times." &nbsp;&nbsp;Still makes sense! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com &gt;<I> </I> <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres <I>&nbsp;</I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: = &nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi <BR>&lt; http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + = http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely &nbsp;&gt;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_111.ec70826.29c0bdb5_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Dobson Website From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 09:53:08 -0500   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C1CA9E.C9B217E0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   And I guess C# because it's not a commonly played note!!!! -----Original Message----- From: Cremona502@cs.com [mailto:Cremona502@cs.com] Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2002 9:36 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Dobson Website     In a message dated 3/13/02 2:03:20 PM !!!First Boot!!!, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes:         I have a question, however, why is there no CCCC# in the Pedal Bourdon 32' stop on the organ of St. Lukes Episcopal Church, Kalamazoo, MI, Opus 57, 1992?       Probably couldn't afford it. Maybe they should have a little collection bowl and everyone who finds the note needful can drop in a quarter. Then in ten years or so they can.....     buy a coke!! ;-)     Leaving off C# in the lowest octave was a way of saving space and money in "olden times." Still makes sense! ;-)     Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely >   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C1CA9E.C9B217E0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D"text/html; = charset=3Diso-8859-1">     <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.50.4913.1100" name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><SPAN class=3D451245214-13032002><FONT face=3DGaramond = color=3D#800000>And I guess C# because it's not a commonly played note!!!!</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV class=3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3Dltr align=3Dleft><FONT = face=3DTahoma size=3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> Cremona502@cs.com [mailto:Cremona502@cs.com]<BR><B>Sent:</B> Wednesday, March 13, 2002 9:36 AM<BR><B>To:</B> pipechat@pipechat.org<BR><B>Subject:</B> Re: Dobson Website<BR><BR></FONT></DIV><FONT face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D2>In = a message dated 3/13/02 2:03:20 PM !!!First Boot!!!, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org = writes: <BR><BR><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px = solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px" TYPE=3D"CITE">I have a question, however, why is there no CCCC# in the = Pedal Bourdon 32' stop on the organ of St. Lukes Episcopal Church, Kalamazoo, = MI, Opus 57, 1992? <BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D0 face=3DArial color=3D#000000 = size=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D0 face=3DArial = color=3D#000000 size=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF">Probably couldn't afford it. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Maybe they should have a little collection bowl and everyone who finds the note = needful can drop in a quarter. &nbsp;&nbsp;Then in ten years or so they can..... <BR><BR><BR>buy a coke!! &nbsp;;-) <BR><BR><BR>Leaving off C# in the = lowest octave was a way of saving space and money in "olden times." = &nbsp;&nbsp;Still makes sense! &nbsp;;-) <BR><BR><BR>Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com = &gt;<I> </I><BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, = Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres <I>&nbsp;</I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: = &nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi <BR>&lt; http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely &nbsp;&gt;</FONT> = </FONT></BODY></HTML>   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C1CA9E.C9B217E0--  
(back) Subject: Trends in color and finish of pipes From: "Michael K. Cronin" <mcronin@iag.net> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 12:21:28 -0500   Hi:   Aesthetically, are there "trends" in pipe organ installations in terms of choosing gold as opposed to silver pipes, and in terms of choosing pipes with a shiny finish as opposed to those with a dull one? Are there rules = of thumb for choosing one over the other?   In installing pipes, is it advisable to "frame" or "highlight" the pipes visually by use of "borders" as many churches seem to do, or to make them appear as inconspicuous as possible by blending them into the background?   ___________________________ Michael K. Cronin Ormond Beach, FL http://home.iag.net/~mcronin      
(back) Subject: Trends in color and finish of pipes From: "Michael K. Cronin" <mcronin@iag.net> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 12:22:24 -0500   Hi:   Aesthetically, are there "trends" in pipe organ installations in terms of choosing gold as opposed to silver pipes, and in terms of choosing pipes with a shiny finish as opposed to those with a dull one? Are there rules = of thumb for choosing one over the other?   In installing pipes, is it advisable to "frame" or "highlight" the pipes visually by use of "borders" as many churches seem to do, or to make them appear as inconspicuous as possible by blending them into the background?   ___________________________ Michael K. Cronin Ormond Beach, FL http://home.iag.net/~mcronin      
(back) Subject: RE: Trends in color and finish of pipes From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 13:02:28 -0500   I would say that the prominence given to pipes should depend on their location. The most prominent feature at the front of a church should be = the altar, possibly with its attendent adornments such as riddels or reredos. The impression should not be given that people are in the church to = worship the organ, but one risks giving this impression when the east end is dominated by an overwhelming case or covered with many dozens of pipes, however beautifully deployed. A plain grille would probably be disappointing-- but if the organ is located across the front, great visual restraint is called for lest its appearance be too obtrusive.   When the organ is situated elsewhere, however, I think that people should = be able to see perfectly clearly that it is an organ, and every effort to = make it splendid as well as honest is in order.    
(back) Subject: liturgical question for the church dedication (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 10:32:14 -0800   Is there something OTHER than Phos hilaron we could sing for the blessing of the Sanctuary Lamp? I've already used up the "light" texts from St. John's Gospel for the blessing of the candlesticks ... and leaving out the middle verse of the metrical Phos hilaron with its references to evening doesn't really work.   The form we're using for each item to be blessed is:   Antiphon Verse and Response Prayer of Blessing   You don't wanna KNOW how many antiphons and verses that amounts to (grin), but they're all written, EXCEPT the one for the Sanctuary Lamp.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: Trends in color and finish of pipes From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 16:56:35 -0500   >Aesthetically, are there "trends" in pipe organ installations in terms of choosing gold as opposed to silver pipes, and in terms of choosing pipes with a shiny finish as opposed to those with a dull one? Are there rules = of thumb for choosing one over the other?   I'm not sure what you mean by gold pipes. Some designers call for exposed pipes of flamed copper. Stenciling pipes might, perhaps, involve gold = leaf. This latter technique was popular in the Victorian era and, after a period of horrified reaction, it is being ventured occasionally again in restoration projects. However, it contributed to that atmosphere of busyness and clutter everywhere one looked that seemed to delight the Victorians in particular; will a taste for that general environment ever come back to such a degree?   As for shiny vs. dull, I've never thought much about that distinction, except insofar as one hopes it correctly shows what the pipes are = primarily made of-- tin or lead, respectively (with the largest pipes often using zinc). Organ builders might choose various alloys according to their tonal ideals. Beyond that, the design of the case (and the pipes in it) has many possibilities but should harmonize both with the style of the building and the style of the instrument, i.e. whether inspired by a particular historical period, or eclectic, contemporary and innovative. Now that romantic schools of composition and organ building are held in higher = regard than a generation ago, it is only natural that organs inspired by those periods should revive, to some extent, the kinds of casework and = decoration used then.   >In installing pipes, is it advisable to "frame" or "highlight" the pipes > visually by use of "borders" as many churches seem to do, or to make = them > appear as inconspicuous as possible by blending them into the = background? > In terms of visual aesthetics, I proffered my humble opinion earlier that the organ's prominence should depend on the building's purpose and the organ's location in it. However, I wonder now whether you are referring = to casework generally. If so, the primary reason for it is not visual but tonal. Organs (or divisions of organs) can go in cases, in chambers, or completely out in the open. The open location had a vogue in the mid 20th century in the name of baroque revival, but it was actually an innovation = of rather dubious merit generally speaking, and is seldom chosen today. Some schools of organ building are more amenable to chambers than others are, = but probably ALL of them would agree that it is ideal for an organ to be in = the room but also in a case, which helps focus and direct the sound as well as protecting the pipework from dust, drafts, and other mishaps. Casework = has the greatest weight of history behind it and would be recommended by the finest builders today, together with the visual creativity and = craftsmanship that make organ cases a legitimate art form in their own right.    
(back) Subject: Re: Trends in color and finish of pipes From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 14:32:41 -0800       "Emmons, Paul" wrote:   > >Aesthetically, are there "trends" in pipe organ installations in terms = of > choosing gold as opposed to silver pipes, and in terms of choosing pipes > with a shiny finish as opposed to those with a dull one? Are there = rules of > thumb for choosing one over the other? > > I'm not sure what you mean by gold pipes. Some designers call for = exposed > pipes of flamed copper. Stenciling pipes might, perhaps, involve gold = leaf. > This latter technique was popular in the Victorian era and, after a = period > of horrified reaction, it is being ventured occasionally again in > restoration projects. However, it contributed to that atmosphere of > busyness and clutter everywhere one looked that seemed to delight the > Victorians in particular; will a taste for that general environment ever > come back to such a degree? >   ROFL!   A discussion with my organ committee:   "Shall we have the pipes in the facade be their natural color?"   "Why, yes, of course; everybody wants to see the GOLD organ pipes."   I will not dissuade them (grin); and since the tonal scheme of our new = organ IS inspired by Victorian English Anglican service-playing organs, a gold = facade is entirely appropriate.   I say "facade" with tongue in cheek ... in the first stage of the organ = (to be installed in the interim church) it's likely that the "facade" will = consist of a fence-row of the Great and Pedal 8' principals, with some simple wooden = framing .... again, a fence-row to conceal the pipes and mechanism behind is = something with which the Victorians would be entirely comfortable. The organ WILL be encased in a free-standing case in its final home in the permanent church, = but in the meantime, there's no money OR space for that in the interim church. = The Great will be unenclosed in the front of the pipe loft, with the Swell = behind, and the Pedal wherever it'll fit (grin).   On a more serious note: a Presbyterian church in Cincinnati installed a = large encased organ across the front of the church, above and behind the choir. = A new minister arrived; the first thing he did was order that the organ be = covered by "drapes" ...   "We don't worship the ORGAN", quoth he.   I would observe that in the 19th century (and for a good part of the = 20th), many protestant churches had the organ in that location, and it never occurred = to anyone that they were worshipping the organ.   Who it OCCURRED to was the PREACHERS when the cult of the all-powerful = minister arose in some churches following the upheavals of the 1960s.   I did a consulting job for a church where that was the ONLY location in = the building where there was room for a pipe organ. The minister became quite = irate, for the above reasons.   I said, "well, Reverend, let's put the pulpit around the corner in the = vestibule behind a grille and some potted palms ... I presume your congregation = doesn't worship the PREACHER either."   They didn't get the pipe organ, and they ultimately went happy-crappy, = which was what he was after in the first place.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Wicks Website From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 17:25:00 -0600   Since I saw other postings about new websites, I thought I would point out that the Wicks Organ Company has recently updated their web pages. This includes a new design, and more information, and it's still gowing! You can find it at http://www.wicks.com/organ   Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://www.geocities.com/organwebring The Organ Classifieds http://www.organclassifieds.com    
(back) Subject: Re: liturgical question for the church dedication (X-posted) From: "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 19:16:56 -0500   Hey Bud, How about This Little Light Of Mine??   Mack ;-)       quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > Is there something OTHER than Phos hilaron we could sing for the > blessing of the Sanctuary Lamp?  
(back) Subject: Re: liturgical question for the church dedication (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 16:31:31 -0800   Warped, Mack, REALLY warped (chuckle).   C heers,   Bud   Mack wrote:   > Hey Bud, > How about This Little Light Of Mine?? > > Mack ;-) > > quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > > Is there something OTHER than Phos hilaron we could sing for the > > blessing of the Sanctuary Lamp? > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Remembering Ruth Plummer From: <AFberlin3@aol.com> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 19:50:13 EST   Dear Friends,   RUTH PLUMMER, concert agent and owner-director of Artist Recitals Concert Promotional Service, died on March 6 and her funeral is tomorrow at 10:00 = AM at Bethany Presbyterian Church in Burbank, California. Ruth was my agent = and I have written the following tribute to her to share with you. I'm sure = many of you knew her and thought as highly of her as I did.   Would one of you be so kind as to X-post this to Piporg-L? I have just joined PipeChat this evening to share with you this sad news.   God bless you, many thanks and best wishes to you, my dear colleagues, ALEXANDER FREY   Ruth Plummer suffered from an inoperable brain tumor which appeared in all =   its horrific, sudden ways this past month. It was very aggressive, = growing with immense speed. I spoke to her often during the three weeks that she = was in the hospital and in the hospice. She underwent 5 days of radiation = which left her very tired. She stopped eating and slipped out of consciousness about 5 days before her death. All in all, it was only 3 weeks from diagnosis until death. She knew that =   she had a short time to live and she seemed outwardly to accept it. But = who knows for sure what she was really feeling inside? Perhaps she was in = that shocked and precarious numb state that often characterizes the beginning = of this kind of journey, and just simply hadn't yet arrived to the stage = where she would become immensely upset. Maybe she mercifully passed away before reaching that point. Or maybe she kept many of her deepest feelings to herself. Whatever she decided to do in her final few weeks, she did it = with dignity, just like everything she did in life.   Even though I may have learned something from her passing, I certainly learned a lot from her life. She was my first agent, gave me my start and =   believed in me. My gratitude for that, and for the blessing of her friendship, knows no bounds. I told her this before she died, and I also told her how much I loved her. And during those sad last weeks, I also thought about the many ways Ruth had touched my life.   She taught me how to take time to slow down and appreciate the quieter moments in life. In all the many times I stayed with her at her home, = there were so many evenings during which we would enjoy a nice dinner and relax with a glass of wine and watch the sun go down. She lived high on a hill near Silver Lake with a commanding view of Hollywood down below, looking miles away toward Century City. Her large living room windows looked due west, and we would see the most spectacular sunsets at dusk. Later on, we =   would watch her favorite television shows, myself curled up in a large reclining easy chair that belonged to her beloved late husband, Stuart. = As evening fell, the lights of the city below would shine and twinkle in that =   spectacular way that only the lights of Los Angeles can do. These were sweet, relaxed evenings in which there was no pressure to do anything = except enjoy the moment, and I can picture them in my mind as if they happened yesterday. And I think of how many times I rejoiced at being able to open =   her front door and pull a lime right off the tree within grabbing = distance, and eat it right away. We also laughed a lot: I remember when she showed = me the music to "Yiddische Mama." She had just played a temple service, was driving the car as I was looking at the score, and was almost doubled over = in laughter right there in the middle of Virgil Street as I sang the song to = her in my most outrageously over-the-top Brooklyn-Tel Aviv Yiddische Mama = accent!   She gave me the great gift of her friendship, and this was also manifested = in the friendships I made through her too. I think of all the people who = have graced and so deeply touched my life because Ruth brought us all together: =   Phil Smith, Bill Baumann, Philip and Jean Dodson, Virginia Lingren, Betty Kettleson, Les and Dorothy Remsen, Doug Wilkie, Ladd Thomas and Cherry Rhodes, Robert Tall, Frederick Swann, Robert Turner, Barbara Kalman, and Ruth and Stu's kids: Pamela and Byron, and Phil and Dianne Ramon. And speaking of her husband, no one can ever forget the fabulous Stuart, who together with Ruth filled the house with laughter, music, enthusiasm and great food. There are many more people who are on this list, of course, = but this is an example how a woman who was small in physical stature and possessed a big, kind heart, touched and graced our lives. And we are so much the better for it.   Ruth loved the organ, organ repertoire and sacred music. She gave all of = her church and temple jobs her most dedicated service. She worked hard, practiced diligently (I remember her always practicing scales on the piano =   before she began to practice hymns and organ repertoire in preparation for = a service). She felt that the text of a hymn was the absolute guide for the =   right tempo, registration and harmony--and when she played a hymn, she = knew every word by heart. She was blessed to work for clergy and congregations =   who appreciated and rejoiced in her talents, though in one circumstance, = Ruth had to endure the ongoing brutality of one particular member of the = clergy, a situation experienced by many church musicians. In this instance, she unwaveringly continued to give her very best every week, providing = beautiful, inspiring music for her congregation. She would not allow herself to be broken by a thug. Ruth could be very tough when necessary.   She was a one-woman operation in terms of her management business, and she =   worked hard and in a thoroughly disciplined way, and approached her profession with the highest standards of honesty and integrity--two = qualities which are, sadly, missing to a great extent in the concert management = field. She was in her office promptly at 9 AM and worked almost nonstop until = about 4:30 in the afternoon. There were those of us who had been on her roster = for years and with whom Ruth had developed deep friendships full of love, = trust and openness. I was sitting next to her one day when the telephone rang: news of her younger brother's death. She hung up the phone and started to =   cry. I remember how she hard she wept as she said "My poor baby brother." = My heart went out to her and I tried to comfort her. I was staying at her = house then and she had to go up to Alameda for the funeral. I told her that I would watch everything and take care of her home while she was gone. It = was the least I could do for someone who had been so kind to me.   In closing, I will always remember what Ruth would say to guests as she = would pour them a glass of wine in her kitchen: "Let's go into the living room = and LIVE!" I think this sums up Ruth in a marvelous way. It was her = philosophy. She had known both incredible happiness and incredible tragedy in her = life. Yet, she always lived, and in all the right ways too. So the next time = any of us pours a glass of wine, orange juice, martini, water, or whatever one =   enjoys drinking, let's raise our glasses to Ruth and say, "Let's go into = the living room and LIVE!" Of course, Ruth was teaching us to go into any = room, or anywhere and LIVE. That's an absolutely great attitude about life!   Thank you, dear wonderful Ruth. We thank God that you lived among us, and =   may He bless you in His heavenly kingdom, now and forever.      
(back) Subject: Re: Remembering Ruth Plummer From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 19:25:49 -0600   At 07:50 PM 3/13/2002 -0500, you wrote: >Would one of you be so kind as to X-post this to Piporg-L? I have just >joined PipeChat this evening to share with you this sad news.   Dear Alexander,   Thanks for sharing your tribute with Pipechat. I'm certain many will appreciate your effort.   I have just copied your message to PIPORG-L, per your request.   Tim Bovard Pipechat Co-Admin <admin@pipechat.org> <tmbovard@earthlink.net>      
(back) Subject: Ruth Plummer X-posting From: <AFberlin3@aol.com> Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2002 20:41:55 EST   Tim has posted my note about Ruth Plummer to Piporg-L. There is no need = for anyone else to do that.   Thank you for your kindesses, Alexander Frey