PipeChat Digest #2751 - Thursday, March 14, 2002
 
Re: Bruce's preference....
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Bruce's preference....
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Bruce's preference....
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Milwaukee
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Bruce's preference....
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Milwaukee
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Milwaukee
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
RE: Milwaukee - WOOPS
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
OFF-TOPIC: facing north to celebrate
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Cherry Blossom Festival; Macon, Georgia
  by "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@ACADMN.MERCER.EDU>
RE: BACH'S 317th BIRTHDAY is next week.. Celebrate with us! (X-po st)
  by "STEVE BOURNIAS" <yfd4@hotmail.com>
Re: Dobson Website
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
32's
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: BACH'S 317th BIRTHDAY ... The OLD Cadet Chapel
  by <wchapmn@attglobal.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Bruce's preference.... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 08:25:16 -0800   Also ODD, coming from a traditionalist like Bruce (grin). Except for the occasional English organ perched on the rood-screen (which is a GREAT place for an organ, but American churches seldom have the height, OR a rood-screen), MOST of the historic organs across the pond are in the west gallery. There ARE some exceptions ... one of the French cathedrals (I forget which one) has the Grand Orgue in a gallery in one of the transepts; Cologne has that swallow's-nest organ part-way down the nave, but that's modern. There were some VERY old examples of THAT (again, I can't remember places), but placement anywhere BUT the west gallery was the EXCEPTION, not the RULE.   The divided English chancel organs are a special case, because of the choral service, and because they combine the functions of a Grand Orgue and an Orgue d' Choeur. And THEY didn't come about until the 19th century (for the most part) when the Tractarians restored surpliced choirs and the choral service.   Granted, acoustical and liturgical considerations are at variance here ... ACOUSTICALLY, the best place for an organ is in the east or west end in an elevated position; LITURGICALLY, the choir is wanted near the altar, at least according to current fashion; VISUALLY a big organ-case in the east end is distracting ... I think that was the root of the flap about Archbishop Weakland's remodeling of his cathedral, as much as anything else. A simple table altar facing the people sorta disappears in front of a big organ-case.   I've been in the front, and I've been in the back ... I much prefer the back ... more room for instrumentalists, etc. ... I used to have to do some TRULY weird things to get an instrumental ensemble into a divided chancel (grin), like taking out half the choir stalls and putting the choir all on one side, so that the center aisle wasn't blocked and people could still get to the communion rail.   A divided chancel IS preferable in places that sing Mattins and Evensong on a regular basis ... hopefully we'll have BOTH in the main church when it's built ... a Great Quire / Lady Chapel and chancel organ in the east end for daily services, and a west gallery choir and organ for Sunday Mass.   Cheers,   Bud   Stephen Ohmer wrote:   > --- Cremona502@cs.com wrote: > > > > I don't like (at all) the organ being in the > > back.... it just ain't fitt'n. > > ;-) > > > > > > Heathen. > > steveO said with a smile........ > > > Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > > > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ > > ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > > Visit Howling Acres and meet the > > Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi > > < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + > > http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely > > > > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Sports - live college hoops coverage > http://sports.yahoo.com/ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: Bruce's preference.... From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 11:52:16 -0500   Bud writes:   >I think that was the root of the flap about Archbishop Weakland's remodeling of his cathedral, as much as anything else. A simple table altar facing the people sorta disappears in front of a big organ-case.   Huh?   Are we talking about Saint John's Cathedral in Milwaukee? The organ is (still, I hope) in the traditional west gallery position. I haven't been = in that building for at least twenty years, but at that time it was a = beautiful building and I can't think of any liturgical or aesthetic reason to = remodel it-- especially on account of the organ, a four-manual Noehren that I have always liked very much. Did he ruin the wonderful acoustics, too?   I don't know what to make of Archbishop Weakland. He is a very = intelligent guy with monastic experience and a doctorate in music, (dissertation on Gregorian chant, as I recall). But time after time he has come down on = the opposite side of an issue from the position I would take, or would expect someone with his background to do-- sometimes convincingly, more often = not. His passionate commitment to the Novus Ordo and all it represents makes him, IMHO, a turncoat re other values that he must once have held dear.        
(back) Subject: Re: Bruce's preference.... From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 09:09:25 +0000   Bruce wrote:   There ARE some exceptions ... one of the French cathedrals (I > forget which one) has the Grand Orgue in a gallery in one of the > transepts;     Reims has the Grand Orgue in the north transept. There may be others that I have not seen.   Del Case Pacific Union College  
(back) Subject: Milwaukee From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 09:45:30 -0800       "Emmons, Paul" wrote:   > Bud writes: > > >I think that was the root of the flap about > Archbishop Weakland's remodeling of his cathedral, as much as anything > else. A simple table altar facing the people sorta disappears in front = of > a big organ-case. > > Huh? > > Are we talking about Saint John's Cathedral in Milwaukee? The organ is > (still, I hope) in the traditional west gallery position. I haven't = been in > that building for at least twenty years, but at that time it was a = beautiful > building and I can't think of any liturgical or aesthetic reason to = remodel > it-- especially on account of the organ, a four-manual Noehren that I = have > always liked very much. Did he ruin the wonderful acoustics, too?   Nichols & Simpson is building a new chancel organ, and a chancel console = to control both organs (I think), and doing some mechanical and electrical = updating on the west gallery Noehren. The chancel organ-case will stand where the = former high altar and reredos stood in the apse. The nave seating will be = re-arranged in a semi-circle around a table altar in the nave. I don't know of any acoustical revisions.   It looked to me from the drawings as if N & S took the proportions of the = old reredos as a starting point for the new case; there's nothing wrong with = the case ... it's quite handsome ... but you can IMAGINE what the = conservatives thought about replacing the high altar and TABERNACLE with an ORGAN. = Evidently conservatives in the cathedral congregation found a sympathetic ear in = Rome when they complained about the changes. There was quite a flap, which was = discussed at some length on this list awhile back.   > I don't know what to make of Archbishop Weakland. He is a very = intelligent > guy with monastic experience and a doctorate in music, (dissertation on > Gregorian chant, as I recall). But time after time he has come down on = the > opposite side of an issue from the position I would take, or would = expect > someone with his background to do-- sometimes convincingly, more often = not. > His passionate commitment to the Novus Ordo and all it represents makes > him, IMHO, a turncoat re other values that he must once have held dear.   Very simple explanation: "Roma locuta est; causa finita est" (Rome says = do it that way).   On a practical level, I can't for the LIFE of me see revising a long, = narrow 19th century church in that manner. People in the back are STILL going to = be a city block from the altar, so why not LEAVE IT ALONE?   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: Bruce's preference.... From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 12:56:29 -0500   >Reims has the Grand Orgue in the north transept. There may be others = that I have not seen.   The organ in Chartres Cathedral is in a swallow's nest position on the = south side of the nave.    
(back) Subject: RE: Milwaukee From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 13:21:20 -0500   Bud writes:   >On a practical level, I can't for the LIFE of me see revising a long, narrow 19th century church in that manner. People in the back are STILL going to = be a city block from the altar, so why not LEAVE IT ALONE?   Thanks for the update. I don't mind in principle the idea of the choir sitting in front, with another organ there to support them, as long as they don't look as though they are onstage for a concert. They should be either on one side (or preferably both sides) or, if behind the altar, not elevated or highlighted.   There's one consolation about a centrally located altar: presumably the priest will face a single direction. Those who like him facing towards = them always, like an orator at a convention, can sit at one end of the = building, while those troglodytes like you and me who believe in symbolically facing the Deity when speaking to Him can sit at the opposite end. Keeps = everyone happy-- unless of course he starts facing south again, as during the prior liturgical nadir of the Church of England... nothing would surprise me these days.        
(back) Subject: RE: Milwaukee From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 12:40:10 -0600   There is a photo from the rededication of the Cathedral at: http://www.cathedralproject.org/ showing the new altar with the organ case in the background. If you go to: http://www.cathedralproject.org/see_cathplanmain.htm you can find the plan for the revisions made to layout of the Cathedral.   The Noehern organ is still in the Gallery at the West End and can be controlled from the new console at the front of the building. For more information on the new Chancel organ go to http://www.nicholsandsimpson.com/ - click on Works in Progress and then on the link for the Cathedral.   David  
(back) Subject: RE: Milwaukee - WOOPS From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 12:43:29 -0600   I made a major mistake in the spelling of Robert Noehren's name in my posting. Sorry about that.   >There is a photo from the rededication of the Cathedral at: >http://www.cathedralproject.org/ showing the new altar with the >organ case in the background. If you go to: >http://www.cathedralproject.org/see_cathplanmain.htm you can find >the plan for the revisions made to layout of the Cathedral. > >The NOEHREN organ is still in the Gallery at the West End and can be >controlled from the new console at the front of the building. For >more information on the new Chancel organ go to >http://www.nicholsandsimpson.com/ - click on Works in Progress and >then on the link for the Cathedral.  
(back) Subject: OFF-TOPIC: facing north to celebrate From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 10:45:59 -0800   I actually SAW a north-facing celebration once ... the late Bishop Carpenter of Alabama, who was Chancellor of the University of the South at Sewanee in the 1950s. My rector at the time was a Trustee, and I used to go up there and visit the Holy Cross monks at St. Andrew's School while he did his trustee thing.   Bishop Carpenter was quite a character ... he had been a professional wrestler in college under the name "The Masked Marvel" (chuckle).   I don't recall whether it was Bishop Carpenter or another bishop of the Province who'd been a baseball player, but at any rate there he was, in rochet and chimere (of COURSE) in one of the stained glass windows in the south aisle of All Saints' Chapel, with a baseball bat and glove (!).   Anyway ... the celebration ... the bishop knelt at the Epistle horn facing north for most of it ... it was reverently done ... but the most REMARKABLE thing was that even though it was a low celebration, at the time of the Agnus Dei he started singing "How silently, how silently the wondrous gift is given" from "O Little Town of Bethlehem" in a great booming bass voice. My rector told me later that he would NEVER allow Agnus Dei (it wasn't in the Prayer Book, but only the Hymnal at that time), but that he would sing that instead, whether there was a choir and organist or not.   It struck me THAT'S the difference between OLD *orthodox* low churchmen and present-day fuzzy thinking. If you read the rest of that verse, Bishop Carpenter know EXACTLY Who was on that altar, even if he didn't EXPRESS it in anglo-catholic terms ... I'll forgive him the tinge of Receptionist theology implied (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Cherry Blossom Festival; Macon, Georgia From: "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@ACADMN.MERCER.EDU> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 15:25:27 -0500   Dear all,   I am pleased to announce the 2002 Cherry Blossom Organ Recital Series, co-sponsored by the Macon chapter of the AGO and Mulberry Street United Methodist Church. I'm not sure how many years this has been going on, but = it is certainly an institution during this biggest event of Macon's year. = The series runs from Monday 18 March through Friday 22 March, daily. Each = concert begins at noon and ends around 12:30. The instrument at Mulberry Street Church is a Moller (salvaging parts of the older Skinner that was in the church before the fire in the 50s or 60s), and a new console by Guzowski & =   Steppe, 1997. The recitalists this year are as follows:   Monday: yours truly, a senior at Mercer University and student of Robert Parris   Tuesday: Rodney Cleveland of Jacksonville, FL and a graduate of Emory   Wednesday: David Oliver, college organist at Morehouse College, Atlanta   Thursday: Nicholas Bowden, senior organist at Peachtree Presbyterian = Church, Atlanta   Friday: Andre Lash, formerly of Charlotte, now opera coach and staff accompanist at the University of Georgia, Athens   My program follows, and I will post others as I get them.   Olivier Messiaen: Transports de Joie from L'Ascension (1934) J. S. Bach: Allein Gott in der Hoeh sei Ehr, BWV 664 Maurice Durufle: Sicilienne from Suite, op. 5 (1934) Charles Ives: Variations on "America" (1891)   If you come, please introduce yourself afterwards.   -Stephen Karr      
(back) Subject: RE: BACH'S 317th BIRTHDAY is next week.. Celebrate with us! (X-po st) From: "STEVE BOURNIAS" <yfd4@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 21:18:45 +0000   The "Official" Director of Music and Organist at Cadet Chapel United = States Military Academy West Point New York is Craig S. Williams as of April 1, 2000.......Steve Bournias Warren, Ohio     >From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: 'PipeChat' <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: RE: BACH'S 317th BIRTHDAY is next week.. Celebrate with us! >(X-po st) >Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 09:40:38 -0500 > >Sound wonderful. BTW, who is the "official" if that's the proper way to = put >it, organist of the Chapel at West Point? > >-----Original Message----- >From: Pat Maimone [mailto:patmai@juno.com] >Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2002 9:00 PM >To: pipechat@pipechat.org >Subject: BACH'S 317th BIRTHDAY is next week.. Celebrate with us! >(X-post) > > > BACH's 317th birthday is 21 March: Come celebrate! > > WHAT: Concert and reception for Johann Sebastian Bach (b. 21 March >1685 > > d. 28 July 1750) > > WHEN: Thursday, 21 March 2001 at HIGH NOON (1200 hours) > > WHERE: Old Cadet Chapel, 689 Washington Road, West Point, NY 10996 > (in the cemetery area at the north end of post) > > WHO: Everyone is welcome! > > Artists from West Point include > Miss Meredith Baker, organ, Most Holy Trinity Chapel > Mrs. Constance Chase, soprano, director, Cadet Glee Club > Dr./Sergeant Major Joel Evans, oboe, oboe d'amore, USMA = Band > Ms. Patricia R. Maimone, organ, producer, Post Chapel > Sergeant First Class Alan Reese, organ, USMA Band > Mrs. Lois Reese, soprano, director, Sacred Heart School Senior >Chorus, > Highland Falls, NY > Marty Tyce, trombone, USMA Band > > Artists from off post include Ms. Emily Faxon, violin >(Cornwall-on-Hudson) > Dr. Ruthanne >Schempf, keyboard (Cornwall-on-Hudson) > Ms. Michele >Eaton, soprano (New York City) > > The members of Sacred Heart School's Senior Chorus in Highland Falls >will > be making their first appearance on the series. > > Very important in making this performance happen: > Gary Ferguson, Organ Curator > William G. Chapman, Associate Organ Curator > > WHAT music will be played? > Organ chorale preludes and larger works, > the famous "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor" > excerpts from cantatas (such as Cantata 142, spurious though it may = be) > > and choral-orchestral works including soprano aria > "Quia respexit" from "Magnificat" with oboe d'amore, > "Ich folge dir gleichfalls" from the Saint John Passion with flute > and > "Weichet nur" from solo Wedding Cantata 202 with English horn > > HOW MUCH? Free admission > > WILL there be birthday cake and ice cream? Yes, indeed, following the >concert. > > For info, Please reply via e-mail patmai@juno.com > or yp6867@usma.edu > or call Ms. Pat Maimone at > 845-938-2959 > > > > >________________________________________________________________ >GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! >Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! >Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: >http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/. > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >         _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp.    
(back) Subject: Re: Dobson Website From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 17:08:27 EST     --part1_88.154739ff.29c2795b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/14/02 3:38:03 PM !!!First Boot!!!, MyrtleBeachMusic@aol.com writes:     > > >> If space and/or money was a problem, I would have opted for an >> INDEPENDENT Resultant from C - F, or C - E, or whatever was necessary; = or >> >   I can't believe you'd rather have 13 resultant notes than 12 real ones! = Is low C# REALLY that important??? I've even heard of some situations in =   which the bottom five notes are played by two pipes of "questionable" pitch.... alternating notes. It pitch really a consideration that low. = Roy's explanation of C# D and D# makes sense.   Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & = Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely >   --part1_88.154739ff.29c2795b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/14/02 3:38:03 PM !!!First Boot!!!, MyrtleBeachMusic@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">If space and/or = money was a problem, I would have opted for an INDEPENDENT Resultant from = C - F, or C - E, or whatever was necessary; or monkey quints, which I'm on = a one-organist crusade to revive (grin). </BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>I can't believe you'd rather have 13 resultant notes than 12 real = ones! &nbsp;&nbsp;Is low C# REALLY that important??? = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I've even heard of some situations in which = the bottom five notes are played by two pipes of "questionable" pitch.... = alternating notes. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;It pitch really a consideration that = low. &nbsp;&nbsp;Roy's explanation of C# D and D# makes sense. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR> Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com &gt;<I> </I> <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres <I>&nbsp;</I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: = &nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi <BR>&lt; http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + = http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely &nbsp;&gt;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_88.154739ff.29c2795b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: 32's From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 14:51:29 -0800     --------------F809863E607E82C47983EF18 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit         > BUD WROTE: > >> >> >> > If space and/or money was a problem, I would have opted for an >> > INDEPENDENT Resultant from C - F, or C - E, or whatever was >> > necessary; or monkey quints, which I'm on a one-organist crusade to >> > revive (grin). >> > I can't believe you'd rather have 13 resultant notes than 12 real > ones!   I didn't SAY that ... what I SAID was make C-C#-D-D#-E (F-F#, depending on money and space) as INDEPENDENT resultant notes, and take up the true 32' at F or G. A resultant tone is no less "real" from the listener's standpoint if it's independent and tuned / voiced correctly.   > Is low C# REALLY that important???   Well, you like to play all those things I mentioned in D ... C# is the root of the first-inversion V6 chord in D (grin).   > I've even heard of some situations in which the bottom five notes > are played by two pipes of "questionable" pitch.... alternating > notes. Is pitch really a consideration that low? Roy's > explanation of C# D and D# makes sense. > > Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com >   Sure, it can be DONE ... I remember Larry Cortner playing low C for low B at the end of the Franck b minor Choral in recital because the organ didn't have a 32' ... but there are other ways of solving it that work just as well, if not better.   If resultants DON'T work it's usually because they are drawn from the Pedal Bourdon at 16' and the Swell Gedeckt (or other softer 16' stop) at 10 2/3' ... this doesn't allow the quint to be tuned true, as it also has to do double duty as a 16' stop as well. Nor can the relative volumes of fundamental and quint be adjusted independent of their primary function.   A 16' Pedal Bourdon CAN be used for the FUNDAMENTAL, if it's soft enough, but the QUINT needs to be independent ... that's five or seven much SHORTER pipes (depending on where the true 32' begins).   I've played old organs where the whole bottom OCTAVE of the 32' was made as an INDEPENDENT resultant, and you TRULY couldn't tell the difference OR hear the break.   Builders: which works better, two stopped wooden ranks, or a stopped wooden fundamental rank and a violone-scale metal quint rank like some of the old builders used for monkey quints?   Cheers,   Bud   --------------F809863E607E82C47983EF18 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> &nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>BUD WROTE: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">&nbsp; <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><font = face=3D"arial,helvetica"><font size=3D-1>If space and/or money was a problem, I would have opted for an INDEPENDENT Resultant from C - F, or C - E, or whatever was necessary; or monkey = quints, which I'm on a one-organist crusade to revive = (grin).</font></font></blockquote> </blockquote>   <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D+0>I can't = believe you'd rather have 13 resultant notes than 12 real = ones!</font></font></font></blockquote> I didn't SAY that ... what I SAID was make C-C#-D-D#-E (F-F#, depending on money and space) as INDEPENDENT resultant notes, and take up the true 32' at F or G. A resultant tone is no less "real" from the listener's = standpoint if it's independent and tuned / voiced correctly. <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D+0>&nbsp; Is low C# REALLY that important???</font></font></font></blockquote> Well, you like to play all those things I mentioned in D ... C# is the root of the first-inversion V6 chord in D (grin). <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font = size=3D+0>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I've even heard of some situations in which the bottom five notes are = played by two pipes of "questionable" pitch.... alternating = notes.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Is pitch really a consideration that low?&nbsp;&nbsp; Roy's explanation of C# D and D# makes sense.</font></font></font> <p><font face=3D"Arial"><font color=3D"#000000"><font size=3D-1>Bruce = Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com ></font></font></font></blockquote> Sure, it can be DONE ... I remember Larry Cortner playing low C for low B at the end of the Franck b minor Choral in recital because the organ didn't have a 32' ... but there are other ways of solving it that work just as well, if not better. <p>If resultants DON'T&nbsp; work it's usually because they are drawn from the Pedal Bourdon at 16' and the Swell Gedeckt (or other softer 16' stop) at 10 2/3' ... this doesn't allow the quint to be tuned true, as it also has to do double duty as a 16' stop as well. Nor can the relative volumes of fundamental and quint be adjusted independent of their primary = function. <p>A 16' Pedal Bourdon CAN be used for the FUNDAMENTAL, if it's soft = enough, but the QUINT needs to be independent ... that's five or seven much = SHORTER pipes (depending on where the true 32' begins). <p>I've played old organs where the whole bottom OCTAVE of the 32' was made as an INDEPENDENT resultant, and you TRULY couldn't tell the = difference OR hear the break. <p>Builders: which works better, two stopped wooden ranks, or a stopped wooden fundamental rank and a violone-scale metal quint rank like some of the old builders used for monkey quints? <p>Cheers, <p>Bud</html>   --------------F809863E607E82C47983EF18--    
(back) Subject: Re: BACH'S 317th BIRTHDAY ... The OLD Cadet Chapel From: <wchapmn@attglobal.net> Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2002 18:19:23 -0500   COLASACCO, ROBERT wrote:   >Sound wonderful. BTW, who is the "official" if that's the proper way to = put >it, organist of the Chapel at West Point? > >-----Original Message----- > > > WHERE: Old Cadet Chapel, 689 Washington Road, West Point, NY 10996 > (in the cemetery area at the north end of post) > Dear list:   This event is _not_ happening at The Cadet Chapel (where the bigger organ is) -- it is happening at _The OLD Cadet Chapel_ (where a smaller organ is).   Just a minor correction,   Wm. Chapman