PipeChat Digest #2756 - Saturday, March 16, 2002
 
Re: Trends in color and finish of pipes
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Bruce's preference....
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Trends in color and finish of pipes
  by "John Cormack" <jcorm@bellatlantic.net>
Re: Trends in color and finish of pipes
  by "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Help!
  by "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
Help!!
  by "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
RE: Bruce's preference....
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Bruce's preference....
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Bruce's preference....
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Bruce's preference....
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Bruce's preference....
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Rood-organs. etc.
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: ELCA Pastor in San Carlos/Redwood City area
  by "Margarete Thomsen" <mthomsen@umich.edu>
Shirley Scott obit
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Dobson website & 32's
  by "Panning" <jpanning@cal-net.net>
Organs: What looks good, what don't...
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Organs: What looks good, what don't...
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Ken Griffin
  by "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com>
Re: Rood-organs. etc.
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Trends in color and finish of pipes From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 07:32:07 EST     --part1_140.b26f130.29c49547_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/13/2002 12:18:52 PM Eastern Standard Time, mcronin@iag.net writes:     > In installing pipes, is it advisable to "frame" or "highlight" the pipes > visually by use of "borders" as many churches seem to do, or to make = them > appear as inconspicuous as possible by blending them into the = background? > >   in my observation (from mostly a maintainer's point of view) that most pipework that is "framed" is done so as a structural requirement of the casework. Since those longer pipes need to be racked higher up, the = racking needs to be supported so that it can in turn support the pipes. SO the vertical elements in the casework (in these instances, at least) - that is =   particularly in the facade - are structural as well as decorative. the one =   noteable organ (in my own personal world of experience) that used the pipework (only) as the facade with no visible means of support (tho it WAS =   there, just not visible)is the great facade of the Moller (1964) at the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington DC which uses principal pipes from 32' CCCC upwards thru the pitches to the 2' range in a gigantic "M" - shaped arrangement, tho I suspect that this has been changed in the recent = rebuild. Up close, you can see the steel supports that hold everything up, but from =   the floor (about 35 - 40 feet bel;ow the gallery where the organ is) the pipes look like they are just there.   Rick in VA   --part1_140.b26f130.29c49547_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/13/2002 12:18:52 PM Eastern Standard Time, mcronin@iag.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">In installing = pipes, is it advisable to "frame" or "highlight" the pipes <BR>visually by use of "borders" as many churches seem to do, or to make = them <BR>appear as inconspicuous as possible by blending them into the = background? <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>in my observation (from mostly a maintainer's point of view) that most = pipework that is "framed" is done so as a structural requirement of the = casework. Since those longer pipes need to be racked higher up, the = racking needs to be supported so that it can in turn support the pipes. SO = the vertical elements in the casework (in these instances, at least) - = that is particularly in the facade - are structural as well as decorative. = the one noteable organ (in my own personal world of experience) that used = the pipework (only) as the facade with no visible means of support (tho it = WAS there, just not visible)is the great facade of the Moller (1964) at = the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington DC which uses = principal pipes from 32' CCCC <BR>upwards thru the pitches to the 2' range in a gigantic "M" - shaped = arrangement, tho I suspect that this has been changed in the recent = rebuild. Up close, you can see the steel supports that hold everything up, = but from the floor (about 35 - 40 feet bel;ow the gallery where the organ = is) the pipes look like they are just there. <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_140.b26f130.29c49547_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Bruce's preference.... From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 11:09:38 EST     --part1_c1.1d79ce71.29c4c842_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/16/02 6:41:12 AM !!!First Boot!!!, dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com writes:     > Being from Mississippi, I can't imagine an Assembly of > > God church having a pipe organ. For their music, a > Hammond with Lesbian speakers would suit their needs. >   Well, if it's a Hammond it would properly be placed on a rude screen!! = ;-)     Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & = Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely >   --part1_c1.1d79ce71.29c4c842_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/16/02 6:41:12 AM !!!First Boot!!!, dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Being from = Mississippi, I can't imagine an Assembly of <BR> <BR>God church having a pipe organ. &nbsp;For their music, a <BR>Hammond with Lesbian speakers would suit their needs. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Well, if it's a Hammond it would properly be placed on a rude screen!! = &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com &gt;<I> </I> <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres <I>&nbsp;</I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: = &nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi <BR>&lt; http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + = http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely &nbsp;&gt;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_c1.1d79ce71.29c4c842_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Trends in color and finish of pipes From: "John Cormack" <jcorm@bellatlantic.net> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 11:13:17 -0500   The changes to the gigantic M are minor, only visible in the center = section, where the positiv divisions, removed when the artwork was installed on the rear wall in front of the organ several years ago, have been reinstalled behind the M facade in the center. It now looks like the gigantic M with a little inverted V in the center part.   "the one noteable organ (in my own personal world of experience) that used the pipework (only) as the facade with no visible means of support (tho it WAS there, just not visible)is the great facade of the Moller (1964) at = the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington DC which uses principal pipes from 32' CCCC upwards thru the pitches to the 2' range in a gigantic "M" - shaped arrangement, tho I suspect that this has been changed in the recent rebuild. Up close, you can see the steel supports that hold everything up, but from the floor (about 35 - 40 feet below the gallery where the organ is) the pipes look like they are just there."   -- John Cormack    
(back) Subject: Re: Trends in color and finish of pipes From: "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 10:14:24 -0500       On Wed, 13 Mar 2002 12:21:28 -0500 "Michael K. Cronin" <mcronin@iag.net> writes: > Hi: > > Aesthetically, are there "trends" in pipe organ installations in > terms of > choosing gold as opposed to silver pipes, and in terms of choosing > pipes > with a shiny finish as opposed to those with a dull one? Are there > rules of > thumb for choosing one over the other? > > In installing pipes, is it advisable to "frame" or "highlight" the > pipes > visually by use of "borders" as many churches seem to do, or to make > them > appear as inconspicuous as possible by blending them into the > background? > Dear Michael (and List),   I think this is a very important area, and it seems to get left solely up to the decision of the organbuilder far too many times.   The visual design of an organ MUST be done with great sensitivity to the space it will reside. Let me use my church as an example.   The Space: The church was built in 1893 and is considered "Queen Anne" style. the Sanctuary ( worship space) is approx. 48 x 72. The floor is red oak and there is a red oak wainscott capped with a chair rail on the West, South and North walls. The ceiling is pressed tin in a cruciform Barrel vault and reaches 30 feet in height. The communion table is centered and the pulpit is also centered above and behind the table. (This is a Presbyterian Church).   The First Organ: A 17 rank 1879 Johnson Bros. which was moved from our previous building. It sat on the North third of the East wall. There are no surviving photographs of what this really looked like, although the organ itself survives in another local church !   The Second Organ: This was a 1928 IV/38 Moller. Extensive modifications to the building were made to create the chambers for this instrument. The GREAT/CHOIR Chamber was on the North side of the east wall and was 20' in height, and about 14' feet wide and approx 5' deep. on the South side of the East Wall the SWELL chamber was of reduced height but twice the depth. In the center (Above the Pulpit) a SOLO chamber was created and was about 6" in depth and although quite wide - it spoke only through a rather small opening - about 10' feet wide and 6' high. The casework projected into the space 3 feet on both the GREAT/CHOIR and SWELL sides, while the SOLO was flush with the East wall. Between the chambers were two very tall Doors that led to the rest of the church buiding, while behind the pulpit was a very large wooden panel over 8 ' high and the width was about 12'.   All of the facade was fenced in (as Alan Laufman told me) "Tonally Challenged Pipework". It was all painted a metallic Gold. There was virtually NO woodwork above the impost level. The effect was that the entire East wall was visually covered in organ pipes ! This might seem to be really worshipping the organ, but was not the case ! Because of the lack of case work above the impost, the only woodwork above that level was the pulpit and the panel behind it ! This caused a visual focus on the pulpit and the organ, certainly "noticable" actually became a backdrop for the pulpit area.   Organ Three: In 1977 The Moller was in need of re-leathering and other maintenance work and the organist was complaining that it wasn't "bright" enough. After proposals from several major builders, the church decided to go with the lowest bidder who promised eh could turn the organ nto a brand now Neo-Baroque instrument for 1/2 halfd the price of anyone else. Needless to say, this was a disaster! All of the facade pipe were trashed and in thier place elecrtomechanical flower boxes appeared to cover up the remaining areas the had been covered by the facade, large sheets of stained plywood were tacked up. Visually this organ, while supposedly looking like a Holtkamp, failed miserably and looked as bad as it sounded.   Organ Four: The church is anticipating that this organ will be installed by Casavant in the Spring of 2003. The East wall has again undergone mafor renovatins to provide a single centered chamber for the 40 rank instrument. the Casework will project into the room 5 feet and the facade was proposed as a very "Casavant looking" style with two major pipe towers. However, one of the major contributors is an architect and insisted that the facade be modified to eliminate all woodwork above the impost. this reflects the look achieved by the 1928 Moller and works very well against the "warm beige" paint of the walls and ceiling. Again "Gold" was selected as the pipe color which picks up the gold ornamentation of the ceiling, the large hanging lamps, the Brass candlesticks on the communion table, etc. The original Casavant design, while screaming "CASAVANT" was too severe a look for this space and the new design will blend in far better.   Because of the color of the walls and ceiling, the predominate colors in the massive stained glass windows, and the use of much Bress ( as opposed to Silver) in candlesticks, etc., Gold painted facade pipes were indicated. While this is certainly NOT the ideal for every situation, it will work well here.   The facade design and "colorization" must be done with great care to work WITH the existing building, and since very building is different, so must every facade !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY             ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! 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(back) Subject: Help! From: "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 12:03:33 -0500   I need Bob Bass' email address. AKA Tibia   TIA   Mack  
(back) Subject: Help!! From: "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 12:23:55 -0500   I got what I needed Thanks again. These lists are really great.   Thanks again Ad.!!!   Mack  
(back) Subject: RE: Bruce's preference.... From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2002 13:33:08 -0500   Malcolm writes:   >I guess some of these Pentecostals are seeking a touch of class   They are. From what I have read, there seems to be a definite interest in high-church liturgics among the younger members, to the extent that = various services on Sunday mornings may have different formats. While the = oldsters continue to prefer the freest and schmaltziest goings-on, their juniors = are tending to go for decorum and more refined tastes-- rather the opposite of generational stereotypes.   I am acquainted with such a family myself. The young and conscientious father is an ordained clergyman in one of the pentecostal communities; however, his two sons are choristers in a traditionalist Episcopal men and boys' choir, with his enthusiastic support and encouragement from the outset, and he too is now very much involved in the life of that parish.    
(back) Subject: RE: Bruce's preference.... From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2002 13:41:09 -0500   >Except for the occasional English organ perched on the rood-screen (which is a GREAT > place for an organ,   It may seem so, and be so in large part-- but there are also problems because some of the divisions must speak into *either* the choir or the nave and are not heard very well, or at least = with the same balance, on the other side. When one can assume that a given event is essentially in the choir or in the nave, one might be able to register and play accordingly, but what to do about the other occasions, e.g. recitals?   I'd be interested to hear stories about how organ builders and organists deal with this situation in various times and places.    
(back) Subject: Re: Bruce's preference.... From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 07:40:49 +1200   And I s'pose an alien from pennsylvania? Not forgetting that lots of electronics used to be made by conn-artists/ Ross -----Original Message----- From: Cremona502@cs.com <Cremona502@cs.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, March 17, 2002 4:09 AM Subject: Re: Bruce's preference....     In a message dated 3/16/02 6:41:12 AM !!!First Boot!!!, dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com writes:       Being from Mississippi, I can't imagine an Assembly of   God church having a pipe organ. For their music, a Hammond with Lesbian speakers would suit their needs.       Well, if it's a Hammond it would properly be placed on a rude screen!! ;-)     Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely >      
(back) Subject: Re: Bruce's preference.... From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 15:03:28 EST     --part1_15f.a760905.29c4ff10_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/16/02 5:51:23 PM !!!First Boot!!!, pemmons@wcupa.edu writes:     > While the oldsters > continue to prefer the freest and schmaltziest goings-on, their juniors = are > tending to go for decorum and more refined tastes-- rather the opposite = of > generational stereotypes. >   Ah.... rebellious youth!! I wonder if the pentecostal church will start dumbing-up to hold on to their youth! ;-)   Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & = Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely >   --part1_15f.a760905.29c4ff10_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/16/02 5:51:23 PM !!!First Boot!!!, pemmons@wcupa.edu writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">While the oldsters <BR>continue to prefer the freest and schmaltziest goings-on, their = juniors are <BR>tending to go for decorum and more refined tastes-- rather the = opposite of <BR>generational stereotypes. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Ah.... rebellious youth!! &nbsp;&nbsp;I wonder if the pentecostal = church will start dumbing-up to hold on to their youth! &nbsp;&nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR> Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com &gt;<I> </I> <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres <I>&nbsp;</I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: = &nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi <BR>&lt; http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + = http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely &nbsp;&gt;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_15f.a760905.29c4ff10_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Bruce's preference.... From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 16:22:58 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, March 16, 2002 2:40 PM Subject: Re: Bruce's preference....     > And I s'pose an alien from pennsylvania? Not forgetting that lots of > electronics used to be made by conn-artists/ > Ross   If you're from New Berlin, NY, the correct term is "Conn-Artiste".   Signed, Ed Welch      
(back) Subject: Rood-organs. etc. From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 13:41:14 -0800   I've had the same questions for years, but no satisfactory answers ...   There were some EARLY examples of rood-screen organs where Gt. Open = Diapason I was in the nave facade, and Gt. Open Diapason II was in the quire facade (Durham?), but I've never seen any explanation of what they did with the = SWELL (once it developed); one assumes that the "Chair" organ normally faced = into the Quire, as it does at King's.   On a modern organ, of course, it would be possible to have Nave and Quire shutters on the front and back of the swell box; I still don't know what = one would do about the Great, unless the case was open from front to back ... = but then one would never hear the organ in balance, and it would be impossible = to use the Great to accompany the choir.   There are similar questions with Spanish baroque organs, with their Front Positivs facing into the Coro area, and their Back Positivs facing into = the side aisles. Surely that was exploited in the literature, but I've never seen = any explanation of it.   Of course, the Spanish organs had no accompanimental functions to fulfil, = to speak of ... unlike the English organs.   Cheers,   Bud   "Emmons, Paul" wrote:   > >Except for the occasional English organ perched on the rood-screen = (which > is a GREAT > > place for an organ, > > It may seem so, and be so in large part-- but there are also problems > because some of the divisions must speak into > *either* the choir or the nave and are not heard very well, or at least = with > the same balance, on the other side. When one > can assume that a given event is essentially in the choir or in the = nave, > one might be able to register and play accordingly, but > what to do about the other occasions, e.g. recitals? > > I'd be interested to hear stories about how organ builders and organists > deal with this situation in various times and places. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: ELCA Pastor in San Carlos/Redwood City area From: "Margarete Thomsen" <mthomsen@umich.edu> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 17:18:17 -0500   Can someone recommend a good, sympathetic pastor in the Redwood City/San Carlos (CA) area to speak with my father who is gravely ill. I'm visiting =   from Michigan and don't know anyone here in the area.     MARGARETE THOMSEN ~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~` Mac OS/Comm Consultant : Outside of a dog, a book is http://www.umich.edu/~mthomsen : man's best friend; mthomsen@umich.edu : inside of a dog, it's too : dark to read!  
(back) Subject: Shirley Scott obit From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 16:50:07 -0600   Saw this in today's NYTimes:   http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/16/obituaries/16SCOT.html   Margo    
(back) Subject: Re: Dobson website & 32's From: "Panning" <jpanning@cal-net.net> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 16:40:03 -0500   For the record, the missing 32' C# in our organ in Kalamazoo, Michigan plays low C.   >I see no reason not to use Resultants, as long >as they're INDEPENDENT, so they can be voiced properly and the quints >can be tuned true.   We did this in our organ at St. Paul's Episcopal in Minneapolis. The lowest twelve notes of the Resultant 32' are independent, stopped wood pipes of 10-2/3' pitch. The rest of the spec is here:   http://www.dobsonorgan.com/html/instruments/op70_minneapolis.html   >I remember reading about the 32' "trap" basses. I think the idea was >discarded because it was difficult to make them work well. Do you know = of >any extant ones that are still "trapping?"   During the Toronto AIO convention, attendees saw several large 1920s-era Casavants that employed this feature on 32' Diapasons. It seemed to function perfectly well.   John Panning  
(back) Subject: Organs: What looks good, what don't... From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 17:47:55 EST   Dear Pipechatters:   Most of the great European pipe organs we revere for both their sound and their casework are housed in Baroque cases -- in Mediaeval buildings. Certainly, at the time, the vocabulary of neo-Classical cornices and the = very architectural nature of these instruments would have seemed "shockingly modern" against 12th, 14th, or 16th century Gothic vaulting and tracery.   The real question here is one of appropriateness and taste. And NO, I do NOT give any weight to the idea that "taste is subjective." = When bad taste rears its ugly head, intelligent people know it, and they react accordingly. People are entitled to have different TASTES -- as long as = they are executed WELL.   SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs: What looks good, what don't... From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 18:17:40 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com>   > > The real question here is one of appropriateness and taste. > And NO, I do NOT give any weight to the idea that "taste is subjective." When > bad taste rears its ugly head, intelligent people know it, and they = react > accordingly. People are entitled to have different TASTES -- as long as they > are executed WELL.   To add a pittance to Seb's Post, many years ago I attended a cousin's Wedding with an electronic organ, with hum on the speakers. I suppose that in a roller rink, somewhere, that they could have gotten = away with it. It turned that wedding into a travesty.   It turned out to be a good marriage, despite the incredibly mediocre organ music performed on the "Electric Organ from Hell".   What's the worst organ that you've ever had to play?   Stan (listening to my treasured Ken Griffin recordings).... :)      
(back) Subject: Ken Griffin From: "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 15:21:10 -0800 (PST)     --- Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@attbi.com> wrote: > > > > Stan > (listening to my treasured Ken Griffin > recordings).... :) >   ooh oooo, oooh.......In an 18th Century Drawing Room!!!!!!......oh, yeah, um, "You Can't be True, Dear!" ....... Haven't found anything about him on the web yet, though. My first "by ear" pieces came from his recordings.... then I went over to Biggsie and the BR organ.... but I'll never forget Griffin.... Hammond, right?   SteveOhmer   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Sports - live college hoops coverage http://sports.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Rood-organs. etc. From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 18:29:47 -0500   Bud asks:   >There were some EARLY examples of rood-screen organs where Gt. Open Diapason I >was in the nave facade, and Gt. Open Diapason II was in the quire facade >(Durham?), but I've never seen any explanation of what they did with the SWELL >(once it developed); one assumes that the "Chair" organ normally faced into the >Quire, as it does at King's.   I think the answer is that organs migrated from the rood screen before the swell was developed.   Dick