PipeChat Digest #2760 - Sunday, March 17, 2002
 
Re: Trends in color and finish of pipes
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: engaging and disengaging...
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com>
Re: engaging and disengaging...
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com>
Re: cockups
  by <Icedad@aol.com>
Re: Terminology
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com>
Claude Means (X-posted)
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Claude Means (X-posted)
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Decorated pipes, once again
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Engaging and Disengaging
  by "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com>
Trends in color and finish of pipes
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
cockups
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
St. Agatha's and Joan Lippincott too
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Trends in color and finish of pipes From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 17:41:32 EST     --part1_114.e2a5412.29c6759c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/13/2002 11:09:13 PM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:     > Although I have never stenciled pipes, I have enameled tuning sleeves in =   > various jewel tones to match those found in a stained glass window. I = did > this in a small extension organ, completely unenclosed, for a Lutheran > Church, and the hints of color topping the open ranks looks wonderful. = The > pipework is spotted metal, and the entire colorful display is flanked by =   > twin > flats of highly burnished zinc (when done properly it takes on the > appearance > of polished tin), framed by a mahogany case. > >   TubaMagna (Sebastian) makes a good point here...   The organ upon which I spent many of my formative years learning to play = (and later tune) had an exposed Great division with pipework in a terraced 'A' layout. the tuning slides on the metal pipework were painted with an = enamel (orange!) paint, and the wooden stoppered pipes of the "Stopped Diapason" were also painted in this same color. While it may seem odd to our modern sensibilities, this treatement added a 'splash' of color to an otherwise dull, dark corner of the choir loft. It really worked visually.   Rick in VA   --part1_114.e2a5412.29c6759c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/13/2002 11:09:13 PM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Although I have = never stenciled pipes, I have enameled tuning sleeves in <BR>various jewel tones to match those found in a stained glass window. = &nbsp;I did <BR>this in a small extension organ, completely unenclosed, for a Lutheran =   <BR>Church, and the hints of color topping the open ranks looks wonderful. = &nbsp;The <BR>pipework is spotted metal, and the entire colorful display is flanked = by twin <BR>flats of highly burnished zinc (when done properly it takes on the = appearance <BR>of polished tin), framed by a mahogany case. <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>TubaMagna (Sebastian) makes a good point here... <BR> <BR>The organ upon which I spent many of my formative years learning to = play (and later tune) had an exposed Great division with pipework in a = terraced 'A' layout. the tuning slides on the metal pipework were painted = with an enamel (orange!) paint, and the wooden stoppered pipes of the = "Stopped Diapason" were also painted in this same color. While it may seem = odd to our modern sensibilities, this treatement added a 'splash' of color = to an otherwise dull, dark corner of the choir loft. It really worked = visually. <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_114.e2a5412.29c6759c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: engaging and disengaging... From: "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 15:30:26 -0800 (PST)   --- MFoxy9795@aol.com wrote: > I thought I had a sub organist gig for tomorrow. It > had been arranged back in early February with the > choir director from a church which is at quite a > distance from me, where I have never been before. > Based on this conversation, I had the date, Mar. 17, > written in my planner. > > Since i had not heard from the choir director since   Well, it would have been a good idea to check sooner.   > then, I called her this morning. She said she had > totally forgotten about engaging me for tomorrow and > apologetically said she had engaged someone else. > After a moment of shocked silence, I mentioned that > I had passed up other gigs and wondered about > whether or what I would be paid.   I still think you were right at this point.   She said she > understood my position although the church could not > pay two organists.   No, just one. You. You were the first to agree to do the gig.   She then suggested she dismantle > her arrangement with the other organist, and I > protested that that would not be fair to this other > organist. We left it that the arrangement with the > other organist would stand, and she would get back > to me about what if anything they would pay me. > Not a good place to lave it. You should have got her phone # so you could call back every hour to find out--or checked your answering machine every hour in the interim.   > This was at 9:30 this morning. Shortly after that, > I left the house, was out all day, and did not get > back until 11 p.m. I had two phone messages and an > e-mail from her from about 11 this morning to say > she had talked to the other organist, who said she > did not mind not playing, and could we go back to > our original plan, since they could not afford two > organists!!! She has evidently told the other > organist not to play even though she had not > discussed it with me in the meantime! > > I sent her an e-mail saying that it was too late to > call her back and too late to go back to the > original arrangement. After all, if I had known I > was going to play, I would have gone over hymns,   After all this time they hadn't given you the hymns? All the more reason to think there should have been more communication.   > made sure I turned in at a reasonable hour, and > gotten directions to the church, at the very least. > > It sounds like a clever attempt to not have to pay > for two organists. > > What say ye list members? > > Merry Foxworth > Plenty of goofing on everybody's part.   Alan     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Sports - live college hoops coverage http://sports.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: engaging and disengaging... From: "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 15:58:40 -0800 (PST)   she felt > that a yearly average of "x" number of funerals were > included in her > salary. The next summer the rector told me that he > agreed that as a sub > that I should be paid if any funerals came up...   Makes good sense; she was table d'hote organist; you were a la carte. You get paid for each one.   > Since they asked me to > play for the funerals, I thought I would be > responsible for playing for > all the weddings...   Isn't that a bit of a stretch?   I found out later that that was > not the case, > although nothing had been said to me... At least I> knew that at this > summer position that I would be asked to play only > for funerals and not > for weddings, but it did annoy me a bit that I had > to find out the "hard" > way that I would not be playing for any weddings...   Get over it; I think you were wrong to make that reach. > > One former organist/choirmaster of a church who was > a member of another > list used to use this method re: weddings: > > He would send out a form snip > Almost without fail, the form arrived in the mail > the next day... > Sounds like a good way to run a business to me. > > Prelude and I think > Postlude and a few sentences that the church could > put in the bulletin > telling the congregation about myself...   Sounds sensible again. > > I rather like the suggestion of Mr. Gettelman asking > for a faxed or mailed > letter of intent...   > > Yes, it is not right for such things to happen, but > sometimes it seems > like all we can do is to "roll with the punches..." > > Have such mixups happened very often in the past? > > As a particular Sunday approaches when I'm to play > at a church, I try and > keep in contact with that church... to thus avoid > any flubups... And even > before each service, if the Minister can spare me a > moment, I ask him/her, > "Is there anything you need to tell me?" > > One Sunday a minister was *very* glad that I did > touch base with her... It > seemed that on that Sunday we had to perform a > Baptism which had been > postponed from a previous day (I think the baby had > gotten sick)... > I think Morton is making good sense.   Alan   PS I'm using Yahoo for the first time (VERY temporarily). If i'fve screwed this up, please forgive.   alan     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Sports - live college hoops coverage http://sports.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: cockups From: <Icedad@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 19:00:30 EST   THANKS !   I laughed until my stomach hurt.   Daniel  
(back) Subject: Re: Terminology From: "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 16:07:02 -0800 (PST)   --- David Carter <david_n_carter@hotmail.com> wrote:   > My query to the list tonight is: could someone > explain, or perhaps point me > to a website, the definitions of terms such as: > chancel, gallery, narthex, > "west-end", etc. This will help me visualize when > these terms are used in > reference to organ location, etc.   David: I got Bud's reply before I got your question (time warp). I only want to say that you can COUNT on Bud's replies to be accurate and complete (to a fault, perhaps). Trust him. I'd have responded (from a Lutheran but basically Western catholic perspective) less completely than he did, but in total agreement with what he said. > > Since I am LDS, allow me to share the similar terms > used in our church:   I'm going to read this with care. I have a distinct personal (but not theological) interest in the LDS religion, so DO appreciate what you're saying here. and I think you.   > Chapel: The space where our main Sunday worship > (known as Sacrament Meeting > is held > Stand: Located at the front of the chapel, usually > raised 18" to 24", where > the organ and piano are situated, where the choir > sits, where the Ward > Bishop and his counselors sit, and also the > sacrament table, where the bread > and water are placed. > Cultural Hall: a large room, usually with a > basketball court and stage, > where dinners, parties and other gatherings are > held. > > David Carter > Sacramento, CA   David, thank you. We sometimes think YOU guys should learn OUR language . . . and, well, you SHOULD . . . but it wouldn't hurt us much to learn YOUR language, too! Thanks for the opportunity.   Alan Freed   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Sports - live college hoops coverage http://sports.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Claude Means (X-posted) From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 18:58:59 -0500   Dear Y'All,   This morning's second piece during the prelude was a short, nice = chorale prelude on "Down Ampney," our opening hymn, by one Claude Means. One = might consider it modest music, but to my mind it is lovely but also VERY well crafted music with hardly a wasted gesture in it.   What can folks tell us about Claude Means? Still living and perhaps working? He deserves a star in the galaxy for this little piece.   Thanx.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Claude Means (X-posted) From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 20:14:43 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> To: "pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>; "piporg-l" <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu>; "organchat" <organchat@egroups.com> Sent: Sunday, March 17, 2002 6:58 PM Subject: Claude Means (X-posted)     > Dear Y'All, > > This morning's second piece during the prelude was a short, nice chorale > prelude on "Down Ampney," our opening hymn, by one Claude Means. One might > consider it modest music, but to my mind it is lovely but also VERY well > crafted music with hardly a wasted gesture in it. > > What can folks tell us about Claude Means? Still living and perhaps > working? He deserves a star in the galaxy for this little piece. > > Thanx. > > Karl E. Moyer > Lancaster PA   To add to the information Stephen Roberts has already supplied, you might enjoy reading a long tribute to Claude by one of his former students and choristers, Peter Stapleton (whom I knew years ago at Juilliard). This is found on the www.bachorgan.com site. Click on "teachers" on the left, and scroll down a bit.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com      
(back) Subject: Decorated pipes, once again From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 20:29:20 EST   Rick Maryman described the orange-painted tuning sleeves and stopper handles in an organ he knew as adding a splash of color to the pipework of = an otherwise drab-looking installation. As an addendum to my post on our instrument at Christ Lutheran, I deliberately chose the three depest jewel tones (Emerald, Sapphire, and = Ruby) from the chancel stained glass window, to use as enamel colors for each of =   the ranks of tuning sleeves. The parish busybody spared no effort in telling me that "the entire affair was garish," compared to the old pipe fence, the dummy pipes of = which were "layered in gold-tone metallite," as they say on Home Shopping Club. =   When I enquired as to whether she found those rich and beautiful = colors "garish" in the Good Shephard window hovering over the chancel, the = argument ended... SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Engaging and Disengaging From: "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 18:10:42 -0800 (PST)   I think this all points to the personal integrity of the "hiring" musician. If you've booked a date, expect payment. Or at least a greater portion of it for goshsakes. I recently paid a large amount for a 30 minute service, and could have backed out immediately upon hearing the fee, but figured that I'd split cost with the parish. However, I got very ill, and chose to pay out of pocket rather than go through the bus. admin., who was already rather perturbed with me for the fiasco that never totally occurred. With my other bills also due, this could have been more burdensome, but, truth be told, I'd have been more burdened (emotionally and morally) had I not paid the gentlemen for his services. And we had a fun lunch the next week, too.   Steve Ohmer St. Helen's Pearland, TX --- Wurlibird1@aol.com wrote: > Hi Merry, > > In a perfect world, the person who caused this > mess should see that you are > paid your fee. If the church refuses, he/she > should send you a personal > check. You did nothing but act in good faith > on a request for your services > on a specific date. As the offer was extended > and you agreed to it, that is > a binding verbal contract and is enforcable > should you choose to push it. > Note, I said in a perfect world. > > As I have never experienced your plight in this > regard, I cannot do more than > to encourage you to let your conscience guide > you on the matter. I have, in > my forty-four years on the bench seen two > ministers contracted for a funeral > when only one was to have provided services. I > have also seen on one > occasion a minister not show up for a funeral > he was to have conducted. > There was a wedding I was to play for which the > minister refused to perform > after the rehearsal when there arose a sticky > theological point in the > service order. He simply said "get another > preacher." They did. > > The biggest faux pas occurred when what could > best be described as a "society > wedding'" (read=3Dvery lavish) had to be moved at > the last moment. The Friday > night rehersal was inconvenienced by the > contract crew stripping and waxing > the aisles and cleaning the carpet in the > chancel area. Thus the Baptist > physician/deacon's daughter was married in a > nearby Methodist church. > Mistakes do happen but heads rolled over that > one. > > I could write a book. Bet you could too. Roll > with the punches, Merry. Its > the only way to remain sane in this squirrelly > world. > > Best wishes, > Jim Pitts > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: > mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Sports - live college hoops coverage http://sports.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Trends in color and finish of pipes From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 20:19:11 -0600   I think there has been a trend, going on for some time, to allow for natural materials showing for front pipes in new work, and recovery of decoration in historic work. Polished, Tin, Zinc, and Copper, as well as flamed and oxidized copper have been favored for some time in new work. Even Lead and Spotted metal are exposed to view. Some very beautiful flamed copper has been done in our shop with an oxyacetyline torch. Yes, I know all the snickering about certain substances being used to produce flamed copper, but, in my experience the high localized heat of the torch produces much more beautiful results than chemical treatments. This, of course, must be done before the pipes are rolled and soldered. We have also reproduced elaborate stenciling, and are doing so on a current project which includes the restoration of a Murray Harris facade. If you are interested, examples of the above can be seen on our website: I hope to get pics of the Murray Harris on soon. HTTP://imagin.net/~rredman Roy Redman      
(back) Subject: cockups From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 18 Mar 2002 15:13:58 +1200   I deliberately organised a cockup about two years ago. One of my organists (I was Vicar), who is a great pianist and a very fine piano teacher, a = woman in her mid-60s, had always told me that she didn't want to know the hymns = in advance as she could play anything at sight. True, she can. So, on Trinity Sunday I put on the hymnboard the one called "St Patrick's Breastplate" - "I bind unto myself today." That's a fabulous hymn, but of course it goes from a unison setting to a harmony version, adds the = "Christ be with me" section to a dfferent tune, etc. My dear friend Clare started off fine, but about halfway through got hopelessly lost and stopped in the middle of a verse when she realised she was totally out of sync with the congregation, who were also all over the place. I announced very sweetly = to the congregation that it was a difficult hymn and that we would read it right through from the beginning. As I went to the altar to celebrate Holy Communion later in the Service (about 12ft away) she whispered in a way = that about half the church must have heard, "You bastard!" And has never = objected to receiving the hymn numbers in advance since. We remain, as we had been, very close friends indeed. *** I had the tables turned on me beautifully many many years ago. I was 18, = had just begun on the organ a year before and had had only about 6 lessons. Becoming a specification-hunter right away, I had written to C.Foster Browne, Director of Music at Christchurch Cathedral, to ask if I might try the HN&B (about 55 stops) in the Cathedral when visiting Christchurch over Easter a few weeks later. Foster graciously agreed and told me to join him at the console at 4:30pm on Easter Day. I did so and he told me there was = no service that evening so I could play as long as I liked while he went to = do some other work. Fine. At 4:58pm, when I noticed a number of people were milling round in the nave, Foster suddenly reappeared and said, "I lied. Evensong begins at 5pm, with the choir. Everything chanted, anthem book on the back of the console." And he walked off, leaving me, a Presbyterian at that stage with not much understanding of Anglican services, let alone cathedral ones, to cope. Me? Scared witless. The organ, by the way, since rebuilt, was the 1926 rebuild by HN&B of the original 1883 Hill tracker. 4 divisions on 3 manuals, wioth something like this - GREAT 16 8 8 8 8 8 4 4 2.2/3 2 IV 16 8 4 SWELL 16 8 8 8 8 8 4 4 2 III 8 8 16 8 4 CHOIR 8 8 8 8 4 4 2 16 8 8 8 8 PEDAL 32 16 16 16 16 8 8 8 32 16 16 8 Oh, yes, I'm sure my playing could have been included in the cockup category. *** And one final story, also true. My second-ever organ job was at a church that had a foul 2-deck + 25-note pedal tone-wheel hammond. It was ghastly, but gave me good experience and paid an impecunious student a few = shillings each week. Knowing the church had no services at all during January (NZ's major summer holiday season) I left the thing turned on after the = Christmas Day services, hoping it would burn out and would thus have to be replaced = by something better, especially as the thing was about 12 years old even = then. I came back to play the first service in the year, about 3 February, only = to find to my great chagrin that the cursed thing was still turned on and running perfectly. This was in 1962, and now 2002, the same machine is = still in weekly use - and the people are still using the preset key settings I = set way back then. (Remember them - you took the back off the console and screwed wires from here to there etc. to change the settings). Not a = cockup, but I DID try to create one. Regards, Ross      
(back) Subject: St. Agatha's and Joan Lippincott too From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 20:55:32 -0600   5 Lent, Year A Rite I - service music Merbecke   St. Agatha's Episcopal Church DeFuniak Springs, Florida   Prelude: Londonderry Air (piano) Herlich tut mich verlangen (My heart is ever yearning; a/k/a Passion Chorale; text H 168) Processional Hymn - Eternal Lord of love, behold (Old 124th) - H 149 Sequence Hymn - O for a thousand tongues to sing (Azmon) - H 493 Offertory Hymn - Breathe on me, Breath of God (Nova Vita) - H 508 Music during Communion: O mensch, bewein' dein' sunde gross (O man, bewail thy grievous fall) - J. S. Bach Closing Hymn - Watchman, tell us of the night (Aberystwyth) - H 640 Dismissal - no postlude   "Prelude music today is in honor of St. Patrick's feast day and Bach's birthday March 21. The music played during Eucharist is one of Bach's most well-known Lenten chorale preludes from the Orgelbuchlein. The text, most appropriate for this Sunday and this season, is translated, 'O man, bewail thy grievous fall, for which Christ left his Father's hall and came to earth from heaven. He of a virgin maiden pure was born, of man the Savior sure, and came earth's ills to leaven. The dead he raised again to life, the sick he loosed from pain and strife, until the time appointed that he for us should shed his blood and take on him our sins' dark load, stretched on the Cross accursed.'"   I perennially go through this self-examination about whether I am really an Episcopalian. This week has been one of those, for various reasons which I won't explicate. I had lost my favorite arrangement of Londonderry Air, and had to call a friend to borrow her copy, which I received about 10 minutes before the service, so had to sight-read it, without incident.   After church, a member, a true transplanted Scotsman, came up and told me how much he enjoyed the music today. I said, "Surely not the prelude, Londonderry Air." He laughed and said, "No, the Bach. I loved it." Well, that warmed the cockles of my heart. I really thought I did a good job on "O mensch", which I had never played before. I started out not liking this chorale, but decided this was the year to learn it. Each time I played it, it grew on me. Today, I truly loved it while playing it (hope my teacher is reading this), so it was nice that someone else did too.   This afternoon, I traveled to Pensacola to hear Joan Lippincott at Christ Church. Her program:   Grand Dialogue in C (Marchand) Prelude and Fugue in C, S. 547 (Bach) Fantasia in f, K. 608 (Mozart) Trois Danses (Alain) Choral varie sur le theme du 'Veni Creator' (Durufle)   I sat beside the dean of the local AGO chapter, and we had a running debate about whether Joan was wearing a dress or pants. He won - a dress it was.   I took one look at the program and thought, "A wasted trip". However, I was wrong. Marchand has never been one of my favorites, but she made it lively and charming, with great articulation and good use of the reeds on this organ. It made me want a reed stop of my very own.   The Bach I had apparently never heard, but liked it. She was very self-assured, and played with evident enjoyment, her little head bobbing with delight, and the audience's heads right along with her. It was nice to hear an interesting Bach that is not a warhorse. And she turns her own pages too! What period is this piece - the early late mid-youth period?   The Mozart piece was one of my very first favorite organ pieces. I don't tire of hearing it. She played it at a lively clip, but I kept wondering what it would sound like if Felix Hell was playing it. In the first third, the registration or articulation was muddy. I was told that she spoke about articulation at the AGO workshop the previous day (which I did not attend because I had chores to do, including getting our taxes done). However, registration and articulation are sides of the same coin. Anyway, the second third with the flutes was simply divine, with no articulation complaints after that. There was some recurring annoying sound during the whole recital, and I never could figure out what it was. It sounded like a cat coughing up a hairball, and occurred every 3 seconds. After the recital, I found out that a man with an oxygen tank was sitting in the far right set of pews, and was the source of the sound.   Preceding the Alain was a long dissertation explaining the three dances, a phenomenon that seems to precede most performances of twentieth century French organ composers. It is almost as if the performer feels the need to justify playing the music. And so she did - the first dance was allegedly influenced by New Orleans jazz. Well, French guys can't do New Orleans jazz, although the hairball coughing noise seemed to work well with Alain's rhythms.   I have always been fascinated by the studious, sometimes supercilious air some organists assume when attending a recital and listening to one of their own. This was true during the Marchand and Bach, but turned to the "thinking man" pose during the Alain. The second dance was my favorite of the three, but the audience kept looking at the stars on the ceiling and biting their nails. There was no applause at the end. One person I knew there told me afterward that he really loved the Alain, but just didn't' know when it ended.   For the Durufle, three of the AGO chapter officers were pressed into service as the "choir" singing the verses between the variations. This was my favorite of the selections performed. The last time I heard it played I had decided to put away my music and never learn it, but after today, I decided that Pentecost would be better (or not) if I take another look.   It was a good afternoon, a pleasant recital, and I got a CD and a chance to see a lot of old friends too. And the taxes are done.   Glenda Sutton