PipeChat Digest #2768 - Thursday, March 21, 2002
 
easter preludes / postludes
  by "Teresa Schmidt" <teresaqschmidt@hotmail.com>
Re:      Re: A Felix Hell Review
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
Re: searching
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
re: Searching
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Rieger and Rieger/Kloss
  by "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com>
RE: Holy Week
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: searching
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Re: A Felix Hell Review
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: searching
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: Easter Vigil
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com>
Re: easter preludes / postludes
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: searching for ping pong
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Re: Holy Week
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
 

(back) Subject: easter preludes / postludes From: "Teresa Schmidt" <teresaqschmidt@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 05:21:51 -0600   <html><div style=3D'background-color:'> <P>Hi listers,</P> <P><FONT style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff">I'm curious what others are = playing for prelude and postlude for Easter Sunday.</FONT></P> <P><FONT style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff">Teresa</FONT></P></div><br = clear=3Dall><hr>Join the world=92s largest e-mail service with MSN = Hotmail. <a href=3D'http://g.msn.com/1HM305401/16'>Click = Here</a><br></html>  
(back) Subject: Re: Re: A Felix Hell Review From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 07:26:01 -0500   Dear Felix,   You (and your father) are both gems! Thank you for your comments = regarding "the good, the bad, and the ugly". These things happen and when a superb musician, such as you, states the happenings of that day, this enables us = to see the graciousness and humbleness that you exhibit - not only to = yourself but to all of us, whether it be the advanced performer or the beginning student, or even the avid listener. Believe me, between your excellent performances and your warm-hearted personality, this all endears you to = many an audience and I commend you for that. You have so many gifts to offer = and we all learn a thing or two in attending your recitals. Thank you Felix!   By the way, I believe that there is a little "gremlin" in that portion of the Mendelssohn 6th as, around 12 years ago I was performing the work when my husband (a non-musician but excellent page-turner) reached over IN THAT SAME TRANSITION and caught his sleeve on the zymbelstern draw-knob. The rest is history! :-)   Best regards,   Bonnie Beth   Bonnie Beth Derby Organist/Director of Music, St. James Roman Catholic Church Syracuse, New York (33-rank Kerner & Merchant tracker organ) Producer/Announcer: "Orgelwerke" & "Choral Traditions", WCNY-FM, Syracuse; WUNY-FM, Utica; WJNY-FM, Watertown & live on the web at www.wcny.org        
(back) Subject: Re: searching From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 10:09:00 -0500   Dear John' Just a comment on your observations of the old AustroHungarian = Empire. The dissolution of the AustroHungarian empire was the worse thing to = happen to Europe after WWI. This Polyglot empire was held together by the = people's loyalty to the Emperor and it was a check on the expansion of the German Empire. Even today, most Germans in Austria will claim to be Austrians of German heritage. They are absolutely two different cultures and they make = it known to you in no uncertain terms. Prior to WWI they held together = peoples of vastly diverse cultures and there was much intermarriage. They could be considered the first melting pot prior to the USA. I am a product of that culture and have a certain affinity towards the old empire.It might not = have been perfect but it sure beat the rise of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2002 8:42 PM Subject: Re: searching     > Before World War I Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, = Bosnia, > Herzegovina, Serbia, etc., were all part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire > (known before the Napoleonic Wars as as the Holy Roman Empire). Winston > Churchill thought that about the worst thing that ever happened was the > dismemberment of the Austro-Hungarian Empire after World War I, and = recent > events in the former Yugoslavia might suggest that he had a point. Anyway, > after World War II some of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire passed = into > the Soviet orbit and was behind the Iron Curtain (again Winston Churchill's > phrase). Some companies had branches in more than one country and in these > cases the one behind the Iron Curtain became a separate company, = generally > owned by the gcommunist government. Since the collapse of the communist > empire most of these have become private companies again, as in the case of > the Sauer and Euler organ companies in East Germany, which have passed back > into the ownership of the families that originally owned them. An = example > of this splitting into separate companies during the Soviet era was the > famous Zeiss optical company, which had branches in both East and West > Germany. I am open to correction, but I think Rieger and Rieger-Kloss were > originally the same company, and that this was also how Rieger-Kloss = came > about. > > John Speller. > > --- Original Message ----- > From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2002 10:25 AM > Subject: Re: searching > > > > > > > > > > > From another email "Our pipes were made by Rieger-Kloss" > > > > > > > > Occasionally I see references to "Rieger-Kloss" and I know that > > there are many who think that this is the Austrian firm of Rieger, > > now merged with another builder. > > > > This is not the situation. Rieger-Kloss is in the Czech Republic and > > not related to the Austrian firm of Rieger. > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: re: Searching From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 09:46:23 -0600   From ISO Information No. 1 Feb. 1969 Rieger 1845 founded by Franz Rieger, Jagerndorf, Silesia Austro-Hungarian Monarchy 1873 continued by Otto and Gustav and enlarged by branch factory in Budapest 1904 Continued by Otto jun. died 1921 1922 acquired by Josef v. Glatter-Gotz and enlarged by branch factory at Mocker (upper Silesia) 1936 Sons Egon (killed in action 1940) and Josef jr. partners 1939 340 Employees, 3000 organs built since 1873 1945 factory at Mocker destroyed by action. Poland. Factory at Budapest expropriated by Hungary, now state owned. Factory at   Jagerndorf expropriated by Czechoslovakia, now state owned (Rieger Kloss) 1946 Rieger Organs Schwarzach/Voralberg, Austria   Many of us knew Josef (GG) and his work after WW II. During the war he   was a liason officer for a British general; was captured by the Germans and spent the last years of the war in a German POW camp. After the war he started building the compact portable series organs which could be "taken to a bombed out church, plugged in and played". Some said he designed these while he was a POW, but I asked and he said "not actually, but I did think about it a lot" The first eventually went to Hartford and he told me the front pipes were made from copper that blew off the cathedral in Strassburg.   The Rieger firm continues in Schwarzach, but GG's son Caspar has extablished his own firm of Glater Gotz organs in Germany, and has collaborted with Rosales on several projects. Roy Redman            
(back) Subject: Rieger and Rieger/Kloss From: "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 10:22:55 -0800 (PST)   Roy Redman sprach.... --- > > Many of us knew Josef (GG) and his work after > WW II. During the war he > > was a liason officer for a British general; was > captured by the Germans > and > spent the last years of the war in a German POW > camp. After the war he > started building the compact portable series > organs which could be > "taken > to a bombed out church, plugged in and played".   I think Roy personally owned one of those organs - which for a time was on loan to the Unitarian Church someplace around Ft. Worth - I played it when I was skinnier. Quite compact. 23 ranks, perhaps? Stops for the positiv were on the case BEHIND the organist..... quite an interesting feat to change stops rapidly!   Another of these organs, I believe, was in Christ the King Lutheran Church here in Houston, in the years prior to their Noack. I think. Am I correct?   SteveOhmer   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Sports - live college hoops coverage http://sports.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: RE: Holy Week From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 14:48:08 -0500   Russ Greene asks:   >Is it not puzzling that the church would "combine" Passion Sunday and = Palm Sunday which is not actually a natural or workable combination.....   >Anyone know why it was done?   I don't know how conscious of psychology or drama the early and medieval crafters of liturgical tradition were, but, far from thinking that the = Palm Sunday liturgy is unworkable, I'd call it a stroke of genius. It's unnatural, yes. But murder is always unnatural.   The fickleness and ambivalence of the crowd (i.e. ourselves) in first hailing Our Lord as a king, and then only a few days later calling for his execution can be brought home no better than by such a juxtaposition, in which, within the space of half an hour, two such diametrically opposed = Holy Gospels are read, and everything in the liturgy is wrenched with the = burden and irony of the mood change.   I'm afraid I don't recall what the Holy Gospel used to be on "Passion Sunday" Lent 5; but it wasn't the story of the Passion, so I don't know where the name came from. What sense would it make for the story of the Crucifixion to precede that of the entry into Jerusalem, anyway?   Robert Clooney suggests:   >Pastor said, "I concede to modern times. I can't have my congregation go from Palms to Resurrection. Since they don't show up on Good Fri., I'll = do it the Sun. before."   What research have you done in the history of the lectionary to = substantiate such a defeatist innovation?   I don't have an old Book of Common Prayer handy, but I know that the entry into Jerusalem and the passion story have both been read on Palm Sunday = (as well as other days in Holy Week) since way before the Novus Ordo. How do = I know this? Because I distinctly recall, as a chorister, turning towards = the altar and genuflecting at the words "He gave up the ghost" while carryiing = a palm branch in my hand. Such imprints are a major raison d'etre of = liturgy and ceremony.   Paul             > -----Original Message----- > From: r [SMTP:basset3@citlink.net] > Sent: Monday, March 18, 2002 3:39 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Holy Week > > I have an easy reality-based answer: congregants no longer turn out for > Holy Week services. They're off dyeing eggs, visiting Aunt Tillie, > shopping for Easter outfits, planning trips to relations in another = state, > school activities, etc. > > Good Friday extravaganzas have fallen by the wayside. Our choir worked > for weeks and only 17 showed up. It was dismal. In my town, chuches = now > combine for an ecumenical service just to fill a few pews. > > Why did we switch? > > Pastor said, "I concede to modern times. I can't have my congregation go > from Palms to Resurrection. Since they don't show up on Good Fri., I'll > do it the Sun. before." So it's litury of the palms halfway through, = then > switches to reading of the passion story intersperced with choir > selections--When I Survey, Beneath, & Were you there. Nail 'em while = they > are in the pews. > > You will experience Holy Week even if I have to do it all in one day!! > > That's it in a nutshell. Don't even start on Maundy Thursday. > Big city churches can still draw; suburban ones have a tough time. > > Robert Clooney  
(back) Subject: RE: searching From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 17:16:38 -0500   Paul Valtos writes:   >The dissolution of the AustroHungarian empire was the worse thing to = happen > to Europe after WWI.... > I am a product of that culture and have a certain affinity > towards the old empire.It might not have been perfect but it sure beat = the   > rise of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. Paul   It is a fascinating culture-- so important for music and, for that matter, the other arts as well. The dissolution was indeed catastrophic for = Austria and Vienna-- here was this fabulously sophisticated, glamorous city that depended for its wealth and lustre on a vast territory; then suddenly it = was cut off from its lifeblood. Suddenly, but not quite unexpectedly. The empire was known to be precarious and creaky for decades before. Didn't Metternich, the master diplomat, basically preserve a status quo awhile longer which was so delicate that only a genius could do it? People could see it coming with such dread that they repressed it into their = subconscious (as perhaps our generation is doing with respect to a crisis in energy). What fertile ground such an ambiguous and complex atmosphere provided for Mahler, Klimt, Hoffmannsthal, Schoenberg, Freud... The contrast of their probing and tortured opulence with the serene, albeit glorious, triumphal magnanimity of the likes of Parry in England could hardly be more stark.   Are you familiar with _The Austrian Mind_, by William M. Johnston (University of California Press, 1972)? I think that it is a very enlightening intellectual and social history about a time and place that most Americans know almost nothing about, despite its being a crucible for cultural developments of worldwide significance. While I don't expect my pre-eminent Anglophilia ever to be disloged, there is too much Weltschmerz in my character not to be intrigued with Austria, too.   Paul    
(back) Subject: RE: Re: A Felix Hell Review From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 17:25:17 -0500   >By the way, I believe that there is a little "gremlin" in that portion of the Mendelssohn 6th as, around 12 years ago I was performing the work when my husband (a non-musician but excellent page-turner) reached over IN THAT SAME TRANSITION and caught his sleeve on the zymbelstern draw-knob. The rest is history! :-)   I'll believe in the gremlin, too, as an excuse for failing powers. The Mendelssohn Sonata no. 6 is the piece that I could perform from memory in 1969 and could not perform from memory in 1983.   Paul Emmons    
(back) Subject: Re: searching From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 18:01:27 -0500   dear Paul, I will have to look that up at Borders. By the way there is another = one out called just 'The Austrians" which looks into the Austrians pursuit of their own identity as Austrians. As you said, here they were with a city which received its cultural traditions from many nations, intermarriage = with many cultures, just evaporated in an instant. Dollfuss attempted to give them some direction but, unfortunately, in the wrong way. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, March 20, 2002 5:16 PM Subject: RE: searching     > Paul Valtos writes: > > >The dissolution of the AustroHungarian empire was the worse thing to happen > > to Europe after WWI.... > > I am a product of that culture and have a certain affinity > > towards the old empire.It might not have been perfect but it sure beat the > > > rise of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. > Paul > > It is a fascinating culture-- so important for music and, for that = matter, > the other arts as well. The dissolution was indeed catastrophic for Austria > and Vienna-- here was this fabulously sophisticated, glamorous city that > depended for its wealth and lustre on a vast territory; then suddenly it was > cut off from its lifeblood. Suddenly, but not quite unexpectedly. The > empire was known to be precarious and creaky for decades before. Didn't > Metternich, the master diplomat, basically preserve a status quo awhile > longer which was so delicate that only a genius could do it? People = could > see it coming with such dread that they repressed it into their subconscious > (as perhaps our generation is doing with respect to a crisis in energy). > What fertile ground such an ambiguous and complex atmosphere provided = for > Mahler, Klimt, Hoffmannsthal, Schoenberg, Freud... The contrast of = their > probing and tortured opulence with the serene, albeit glorious, = triumphal > magnanimity of the likes of Parry in England could hardly be more stark. > > Are you familiar with _The Austrian Mind_, by William M. Johnston > (University of California Press, 1972)? I think that it is a very > enlightening intellectual and social history about a time and place that > most Americans know almost nothing about, despite its being a crucible = for > cultural developments of worldwide significance. While I don't expect = my > pre-eminent Anglophilia ever to be disloged, there is too much = Weltschmerz > in my character not to be intrigued with Austria, too. > > Paul > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: Easter Vigil From: "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 15:44:46 -0800 (PST)   Bud wrote, about the Vigil: > Hmmm ... I know what you're driving at, and I sorta > agree ... but Baptism > (and chrismation), as ancient as it is, is ONE > component of SEVERAL in the > Vigil Service. The rich symbolism is certainly THERE > ... dying with Christ > under the waters of baptism and rising to new life > with Him in the > Resurrection ... but the Fire and the Candle and > the recounting of > Salvation History are important too ... though I > occasionally get to > chuckling when they do that OH-so-pagan fire ritual (grin).   Oh, Bud, totally agreed. (I LOVE pagan stuff; I'm a nordic demigod anway.) Let me urge you to go to our website www.stlukesnyc.org for photos of our Vigil last year--surely the best I've ever seen (and I remember Anglocathooic (Episcoloopian) Vigils in St. Paul, Minn., c. 1957-60, at 10 or 11 a.m. on Saturday!!!!) I think you'll see that we do try to encompass the many conflicting? themes of such a massive liturgy.   > We're going to do something NEXT year (no TIME this year with everything else that's coming up) that Deon at St. Michael's in Cape Town suggested: they're doing the Psalms and Readings FIRST, out in the parish hall with the lights on; THEN they're going outside to bless the fire and the candle, come into the darkened church in procession, sing the Exsultet, and go straight from that into the Blessing of the Water.   Oh, my. Interesting idea. But I'd have to think about that a lot more than I'm ready to do now--and most certainly chew on it with our cantor and pastor. I must admit that the Vigils I've presided over since 1962 have varied somewhat. The pre-procession stuff used to be MUCH more elaborate than what we do now--but I don't think we've LOST a lot. > > It's always struck me as somewhat odd to do the > fire, the candle, and the Exsultet, and then change BACK to purple vestments (which we still do) for the Psalms and Readings, since the EXSULTET is the solemn announcement of > Easter. > Well, interesting point. Maybe I can arrange a seminar on this among my best instructors; I'll certainly keep you informed if I can do that. But, obviously, not between now and THIS year's Easter Vigil.   Alan   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Movies - coverage of the 74th Academy Awards=AE http://movies.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: easter preludes / postludes From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 22:21:43 EST     --part1_153.ad1213c.29caabc7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   For prelude: the bells are processing in from outdoors (weather = premitting) doing a "free ring".   For postlude: Handel's "La Rejouissance"   Neil Brown First United Meth Church Toms River NJ USA   --part1_153.ad1213c.29caabc7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>For prelude: &nbsp;the bells are processing in from outdoors = (weather premitting) doing a "free ring". <BR> <BR>For postlude: &nbsp;Handel's "La Rejouissance" <BR> <BR>Neil Brown <BR>First United Meth Church <BR>Toms River NJ USA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_153.ad1213c.29caabc7_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: searching for ping pong From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 19:58:59 +0000       There is no disagreement here. There is a common origin but there has been no relationship for decades. My whole point is to correct the idea that many seem to have that Rieger has become Rieger-Kloss. These are two totally separate builders.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College - Home of a IV-85 Rieger   Ping Pong Plunk?   Mike Gettelman wrote: > > John Speller wrote: > (snip) > I am open to correction, but I think Rieger and > Rieger-Kloss were > originally the same company, and that this was also how > Rieger-Kloss came > about. > > Del Case wrote: > Occasionally I see references to "Rieger-Kloss" and > I know that > there are many who think that this is the Austrian firm > of Rieger, > now merged with another builder. > This is not the situation. Rieger-Kloss is in the > Czech Republic and > not related to the Austrian firm of Rieger. > Del W. Case > Pacific Union College > > Ross Wards wrote: > John, > Yes, you're right. The two Rieger firms were once the > same company. > Ross > > Mike Gettelman asks: > Ping Pong, ping pong. Whose serve is it now? > What might be the correct answer? > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Holy Week From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2002 23:43:42 -0600       "Emmons, Paul" wrote:   > I'm afraid I don't recall what the Holy Gospel used to be on "Passion > Sunday" Lent 5;   1928 U. S. Episcopal BCP, Roman use, Service Book and Hymnal, (U.S. = Lutheran) all specify John 8:46-59   ns