PipeChat Digest #2771 - Saturday, March 23, 2002
 
Learning a Profound Lesson
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Learning a Profound Lesson
  by "STEVE BOURNIAS" <yfd4@hotmail.com>
Re: Learning a Profound Lesson
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Learning a Profound Lesson
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Learning a Profound Lesson
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com>
Re: Learning a profound lesson
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Learning a Profound Lesson
  by "Gary Blevins" <gsblvns@camalott.com>
HOLY WEEK - St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church, Newport Beach CA  (X-
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Learning a Profound Lesson
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Learning a Profound Lesson From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 11:21:49 -0500   Greetings, Since Pipechat contains the bulk of my new organic friends, I will make my announcement here. Organ building is a far more difficult job than I had anticipated, both physically and mentally. Enthusiasm and ambition are not near enough personal resource. I have made a lot of noise over the past year or so about the organ building community giving an older person a chance, and Richard Schneider responded to that cry by giving me a taste of the trade at the First Mennonite Church in Berne Indiana on Thursday. He graciously allowed me to participate in the installation of an off set chest containing the lowest 8 notes of a 16' Posaune inside the Great chamber. I was frankly unprepared for the scope of such a project, lacked the physical stamina and agility necessary to participate as a reliable member of a crew who is depending on you for their very lives and safety. I was also ill prepared for the mental stress that comes from working above many thousands of dollars worth of paperwork when one slip of the hand, foot, or brain can cause disaster. I apologize to Richard for leaving the scheduled work session in Berne before its completion, but felt as if I had become a liability to Rich, and his star Organ Tech, "W.C.". There is no room in the chamber for a worker who has lost confidence in his ability to perform in a safe and reliable manner, so I exited the session before the potential arose for me to hurt myself or somebody else, or for my potential mistake to destroy any part of the instrument. Emotionally, I was devastated on several fronts. The realization that I was incapable of the physical demands was a hard blow to my ego. I am a big man, and had prided myself on my strength and agility for my size and age, but it was no where near sufficient for the chamber work we were doing. Secondly, I was overwhelmed by the responsibility required by any member of an organ construction crew, both for the instrument, and for the welfare of your fellow workers. Thirdly, it devastated me that what I honestly thought I aspired to for all these many months, turned out to be a source of fear and trepidation. It was with tears in my eyes that I explained this to Rich on Thursday night before fleeing the scene. Rich was gracious in his understanding, and I hope with all my heart that we will remain friends despite it all. I am not yet sure where this leaves me with respect to my involvement with organs. I still love the music, acquiring technical knowledge of the instrument, and of course, the people of the organ community. As far as my future as an organ builder, perhaps it would be better to pursue it as a hobby, as many folks have suggested in the past when reading my loud noises about organ building envy. In conclusion, permit me to publicly thank Rich Schneider for the eye-opening he gave me in Berne. He took a very big chance putting me halfway up that ladder to catch the bottom of the CCC Posaune resonator as W.C. standing at the top, juggled it into the upper board hole of the 3 story sky rack. It would fill me with terror to ever be asked to do such a thing again. I sincerely salute all organ men who do such things every day.   With renewed respect Mike Gettelman    
(back) Subject: Re: Learning a Profound Lesson From: "STEVE BOURNIAS" <yfd4@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 17:04:18 +0000   It is nice to see an honest assessment of the building part of organ building. Yes....it is taxing and draining to implement a stop list or specification. Leave it to the younger and more vibrant folks in the business to assemble these fine instruments in their final resting place. = As for us older ones we can be content to remain serious hobbiests/ enthusiasts/ organ players/ doodlers/ dabblers. As for organ designers on this list why worry when we have a plethora of knowledgeable = correspondents who in a moment's notice can cough up a specification for any organ = desired from 1 rank to 1000 in any style....pre-1400 to 21st century period/ eccelctic/ hybrid/ anglo/ french/german etc etc. Sure would like to see = and hear and try out some of their work though. regards from warren ohio     >From: Mike Gettelman <mike3247@earthlink.net> >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: Pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Learning a Profound Lesson >Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 11:21:49 -0500 > >Greetings, > Since Pipechat contains the bulk of my new organic >friends, I will make my announcement here. > Organ building is a far more difficult job than I >had anticipated, both physically and mentally. >Enthusiasm and ambition are not near enough personal >resource. > I have made a lot of noise over the past year or so >about the organ building community giving an older >person a chance, and Richard Schneider responded to >that cry by giving me a taste of the trade at the First >Mennonite Church in Berne Indiana on Thursday. He >graciously allowed me to participate in the >installation of an off set chest containing the lowest >8 notes of a 16' Posaune inside the Great chamber. I >was frankly unprepared for the scope of such a project, >lacked the physical stamina and agility necessary to >participate as a reliable member of a crew who is >depending on you for their very lives and safety. I was >also ill prepared for the mental stress that comes from >working above many thousands of dollars worth of >paperwork when one slip of the hand, foot, or brain can >cause disaster. > I apologize to Richard for leaving the scheduled >work session in Berne before its completion, but felt >as if I had become a liability to Rich, and his star >Organ Tech, "W.C.". There is no room in the chamber for >a worker who has lost confidence in his ability to >perform in a safe and reliable manner, so I exited the >session before the potential arose for me to hurt >myself or somebody else, or for my potential mistake to >destroy any part of the instrument. > Emotionally, I was devastated on several fronts. >The realization that I was incapable of the physical >demands was a hard blow to my ego. I am a big man, and >had prided myself on my strength and agility for my >size and age, but it was no where near sufficient for >the chamber work we were doing. Secondly, I was >overwhelmed by the responsibility required by any >member of an organ construction crew, both for the >instrument, and for the welfare of your fellow workers. >Thirdly, it devastated me that what I honestly thought >I aspired to for all these many months, turned out to >be a source of fear and trepidation. It was with tears >in my eyes that I explained this to Rich on Thursday >night before fleeing the scene. Rich was gracious in >his understanding, and I hope with all my heart that we >will remain friends despite it all. > I am not yet sure where this leaves me with respect >to my involvement with organs. I still love the music, >acquiring technical knowledge of the instrument, and of >course, the people of the organ community. As far as my >future as an organ builder, perhaps it would be better >to pursue it as a hobby, as many folks have suggested >in the past when reading my loud noises about organ >building envy. > In conclusion, permit me to publicly thank Rich >Schneider for the eye-opening he gave me in Berne. He >took a very big chance putting me halfway up that >ladder to catch the bottom of the CCC Posaune resonator >as W.C. standing at the top, juggled it into the upper >board hole of the 3 story sky rack. It would fill me >with terror to ever be asked to do such a thing again. >I sincerely salute all organ men who do such things >every day. > > With renewed respect > Mike Gettelman > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     It is   _________________________________________________________________ Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Learning a Profound Lesson From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 11:38:47 -0600   A lot of what is involved in organbuilding is a matter of experience rather than stamina. It is a matter of knowing how to handle and control heavy objects with the minimum physical effort and in such a way as to avoid physical injury to oneself or the instrument. It is a particulaly annoying fact that heavy objects such as consignments of pipe metal tend to arrive on trucks at moments when the fewest people are around to help get them off the truck and into the workshop. This week four of us had to get a 1000 lb. crate off a truck. We managed this quite rapidly and I don't think any of us had to lift more than about 100 lb. in the process. It is a matter of knowing how to get the load sliding across the floor, how and when to insert a piece of wood as a lever, and so forth. With Posaune resonators it is not the weight of the resonator itself, which would rarely be much over 50 lb. but one's ability to control an awkward object and determine the direction in which it goes. This again is largely a matter of experience. When I was new to the business I once lost control of a trombone resonator and put a big dent in a diapason pipe. This caused some annoyance to the pipemaker who had to repair the dent, but this kind of thing happens with inexperienced people and is not the end of the world.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Learning a Profound Lesson From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 13:21:10 EST   Dear Warren and Mike:   I think the most profound lesson in all this is that this is a young man's game. My point is, if you start young enough, muscles build quickly, and last into old age. I couldn't imagine a better way to spend a life, and all the chances of meeting interesting people, and the surprises that can ensue. The intuition of an assembly team, is phenominal and mind boggling. Every grunt, and body language is immediately interpreted and acted upon appropriately. I've seen it over and over again, within hours, a new man, begins to encorporate the intuitiveness of the rest of the team. Within a couple of weeks, you'd never know he was new. It's a full emersion livelihood, and knowledge is absorbed like a sponge, even duties of others. It is a job requiring intelligence, and sensativity, keeping your eyes open, and asking questions when needed. There is nothing funnier or more interesting than listening to stories spun over lunch or going place to place in the truck or car. I wonder how many wonderful books have been lost, because team members were too busy to write them. :) Hint, hint!   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning a Profound Lesson From: "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 11:02:20 -0800 (PST)   Mike, if it makes you feel any better, I'll be 70 this summer. A couple years ago Arp and I peeked into a non-spoacious chamber or two. At that time I was about 240 lbs. Arp was not--but, then, he wasn't 140 lbs. either.   At the entrace to the box, I managed the good sense to realize that he could look around intelligently without any assistance from ME, and (in spite of having enjoyed crawling around in several much latger instruments in Tacoma in the early 1950s) I managed to stay right where I was and not enter even on the first level.   Discretion is the better part of valour.   Alan   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Movies - coverage of the 74th Academy Awards=AE http://movies.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning a profound lesson From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 14:24:57 EST   Mike, you post and responses to it raises a question in my mind: what is more painful, a dream unrealized or a dream lived but no longer possible. = In my case, tuning is impossible due to profound hearing loss of upper frequencies (too many hours with jet turbines screaming in my ears). = Also, inner ear disorders have resulted in mild vertigo which makes perching precariously above pipes below an ill-advised venture with my 230 pounds. = My expanding girth is due to my own lack of self-will although I am still searching for some pathology to blame. :))   You have exercised good judgement to refrain from chamber work if you have = a phobia of heights, cramped quarters, etc. There are many aspects of organ =   work and among them you may still find a way to become directly involved = and fulfill your dream of hands-on contribution. Thanks for sharing your experience with us.   Best wishes, Jim Pitts  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning a Profound Lesson From: "Gary Blevins" <gsblvns@camalott.com> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 14:43:31 -0600   Dear Mike, With affirmation, I welcome you to the masses of us who have been humbled = by the pipe organ building experience. I am building an organ for my home and have assisted in other building projects as well as a few removal projects and can attest to the physical and mental strains of such endeavors. But, IMHO, I would share that it's the most rewarding of any endeavor, to bring heavy, fragile metals, large, heavy wood components, and steel together to yield a sound that pipe = organs bring, like no other instrument in existance. In closing, I share a small anecdote: Removing a 2/9 Kilgen from a church in Chickasha OK, we were lowering the swell chest from the 2nd level balcony via 2 skids we built for sliding = the chests down to ground level. The first chest went down fine, and then we proceeded w/ the swell chest(450lbs) when Mac's rope broke and his end proceeded down. I held on tight to my rope, hoping to save the chest from sliding down out of control when Mac yelled frantically, "LET GO, LET = GO"!! So, in spite of my instincts to hold on to the treasured chest, I let go = and the chest slid down colliding into a row of pews, shearing off a couple = of rackboards and bruising the side of the chest as well as bruising a couple of pews. Mac then explained that if I had held on, the chest would've turned sideways, falling off the one skid, then falling to where I = would've had the whole chest dead weight on the rope, where it would've pulled from even my most noblest efforts, free to fall 12 feet and crash onto the pews below. It would've possibly ruptured the chest and surely destroyed about = 6 pews. Therefore, the student learned one thing that day. sincerely submitted, Gary   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> To: "Pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2002 10:21 AM Subject: Learning a Profound Lesson     > Greetings, > Since Pipechat contains the bulk of my new organic > friends, I will make my announcement here. > Organ building is a far more difficult job than I > had anticipated, both physically and mentally. > Enthusiasm and ambition are not near enough personal > resource. > I have made a lot of noise over the past year or so > about the organ building community giving an older > person a chance, and Richard Schneider responded to > that cry by giving me a taste of the trade at the First > Mennonite Church in Berne Indiana on Thursday. He > graciously allowed me to participate in the > installation of an off set chest containing the lowest > 8 notes of a 16' Posaune inside the Great chamber. I > was frankly unprepared for the scope of such a project, > lacked the physical stamina and agility necessary to > participate as a reliable member of a crew who is > depending on you for their very lives and safety. I was > also ill prepared for the mental stress that comes from > working above many thousands of dollars worth of > paperwork when one slip of the hand, foot, or brain can > cause disaster. > I apologize to Richard for leaving the scheduled > work session in Berne before its completion, but felt > as if I had become a liability to Rich, and his star > Organ Tech, "W.C.". There is no room in the chamber for > a worker who has lost confidence in his ability to > perform in a safe and reliable manner, so I exited the > session before the potential arose for me to hurt > myself or somebody else, or for my potential mistake to > destroy any part of the instrument. > Emotionally, I was devastated on several fronts. > The realization that I was incapable of the physical > demands was a hard blow to my ego. I am a big man, and > had prided myself on my strength and agility for my > size and age, but it was no where near sufficient for > the chamber work we were doing. Secondly, I was > overwhelmed by the responsibility required by any > member of an organ construction crew, both for the > instrument, and for the welfare of your fellow workers. > Thirdly, it devastated me that what I honestly thought > I aspired to for all these many months, turned out to > be a source of fear and trepidation. It was with tears > in my eyes that I explained this to Rich on Thursday > night before fleeing the scene. Rich was gracious in > his understanding, and I hope with all my heart that we > will remain friends despite it all. > I am not yet sure where this leaves me with respect > to my involvement with organs. I still love the music, > acquiring technical knowledge of the instrument, and of > course, the people of the organ community. As far as my > future as an organ builder, perhaps it would be better > to pursue it as a hobby, as many folks have suggested > in the past when reading my loud noises about organ > building envy. > In conclusion, permit me to publicly thank Rich > Schneider for the eye-opening he gave me in Berne. He > took a very big chance putting me halfway up that > ladder to catch the bottom of the CCC Posaune resonator > as W.C. standing at the top, juggled it into the upper > board hole of the 3 story sky rack. It would fill me > with terror to ever be asked to do such a thing again. > I sincerely salute all organ men who do such things > every day. > > With renewed respect > Mike Gettelman > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: HOLY WEEK - St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church, Newport Beach CA (X-posted) ... a mite LONG (grin) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 13:52:17 -0800   PALM SUNDAY - High Mass at 9 & 11 a.m.   Blessing, Distribution of Palms, Procession At the entrance of the sacred ministers - Hosanna filio David - Fr. Rossini At the distribution - Pueri hebraeorum - Gregorian, Mode I / John Blow Silent procession through the streets with bagpiper At the entrance to the church - All Glory, Laud and Honour - traditional At the chancel step - Ingrediente Domino - Fr. Rossini   Mass Introit - Domine, ne longe - Healy Willan Kyrie - Merbecke Gradual - Christus factus est - Pietro Yon recited Passion Hymn - Were You There? - traditional Offertory - Improperium expectavit - Healy Willan Anthem - Why Does He Seem To Be So Sad? - traditional Sanctus - Merbecke Amen - Robinson Agnus - Merbecke Communion - Pater si non potest - Gregorian, mode 8 Hymns Victim Divine - Farmborough Sing, My Tongue, the Glorious Battle - Pange lingua Recessional - Ride On, Ride On In Majesty - Winchester New       MAUNDY THURSDAY - High Mass at 7 p.m.   Hymn - Verbum supernum prodiens - Mechlin chant Introit - Nos autem - Healy Willan Kyrie - Mass IX - Gregorian Gloria - Scottish Chant Gradual Psalm 116 - Troutbeck in G (Anglican chant) At the Mandatum (Foot-Washing) Antiphon - Mandatum novum - Gregorian, Mode III Antiphon - Postquam surrexit - Gregorian, Mode IV Antiphon - Dominus Jesus - Gregorian, Mode II Antiphon - Domine, tu mihi - Gregorian, Mode V Antiphon - Si ego Dominus - Gregorian, Mode IV Antiphon - In hoc cognoscent - Gregorian, Mode VII Antiphon - Maneant in vobis - Gregorian, Mode VII Hymn - Ubi caritas - Gregorian, Mode VI Anthem - Go To Dark Gethsemane - Noble Sanctus - Mass IX Amen - Mass IX Agnus - Mass IX Communion - Hoc corpus - Healy Willan Anthem - Remember Me - traditional Hymn - Adoro te devote - Gregorian Procession to the Altar of Repose Hymn - Pange lingua - Gregorian / Palestrina Stripping of the Altars Psalm 22 - Gregorian / fauxbourdon by Clark       GOOD FRIDAY   Psalm 69 - Gregorian / Clark Gradual - Christus factus est - Pietro Yon recited Passion Hymn - Stabat Mater - traditional At the Showing of the Holy Cross Hymn - Were You There - traditional Ecce lignum Crucis - Gregorian At the Veneration of the Holy Cross Improperia - Gregorian / Vittoria At the Return of the Blessed Sacrament Vexilla regis - Gregorian / Dykes Antiphons - John Blow At the Communion Crux fidelis - Gregorian / Palestrina Hymn - Jesus, In Thy Dying Woes - traditional       EASTER VIGIL - High Mass at 7 p.m.   Lumen Christi - Gregorian Exsultet - Gregorian Canticles - Gregorian, Tonus peregrinus Procession to the Font - Psalm 42 - Gregorian, Tone 8 Vidi Aquam - Gregorian, simple tone, mode 6 Hymn - The Day of Resurrection - Ellacombe Kyrie - Mass I Gloria - Scottish Chant Triple Alleluia - Gregorian, mode VI (from Lauds) Hymn - Lift Thy Voice Rejoicing, Mary - traditional Sanctus - Willan Amen - Robinson Fraction Anthem - Pascha Nostrum - Gregorian, Mode VI Communion - Pascha nostrum - Gregorian, Mode VI Hymn - Chorus novae Jerusalem - Mechlin chant Hymn - Alleluia! Alleluia! Hearts and Voices Heavenward Raise - Ode to Joy       EASTER DAY - High Mass at 9 & 11   Hymn - Come, Ye Faithful - St. Kevin Introit - Resurrexi - Healy Willan Kyrie - Willan Gradual - Haec dies - Healy Willan Alleluia - Pascha nostrum - Healy Willan Sequence - Victimae paschali laudes - Gregorian, Mode I Offertory - Terra tremuit - Healy Willan Anthem - In the End of the Sabbath - Lorenz Sanctus - Willan Amen - Robinson Fraction Anthem - Pascha nostrum - Gregorian, Mode VI Communion - Pascha nostrum - Healy Willan Hymns Jesus Lives! - St. Albinus Come, Risen Lord - Edsall At the Lamb's High Feast - Salzburg Orison - Day By Day - Sumner Hymn - Jesus Christ Is Ris'n Today - Easter Hymn       I'm up to TWO sopranos off the sick list ... we'll see what happens (grin). I'm getting too OLD for all this ...   Cheers,   Bud                    
(back) Subject: Re: Learning a Profound Lesson From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 17:29:57 EST     --part1_ca.8a6e405.29ce5be5_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Mike, I'm really sorry that your first experience in a chamber was not a = positive or successful one. But you did learn an important lesson, that being, = you must begin at the beginning and work yourself into a profession. Perhaps =   you bit off too much too soon.   It was very kind of Richard Schneider to allow you to participate in such = an undertaking. It also shows that he apparently had sufficient trust in you =   that you would know when you had reached the stopping point.   Not everyone can do everything. As you have previously mentioned, your =   interest is in voicing which, for the most part, it done from the floor. = I would encourage to you behing anew, perhaps at a slower pace, and conquer = the more basic tasks before you again hit the chambers.   I sympathize with your feeling of failure, but urge you to use that = feeling as a growing experience and an opportunity for learning.   I would also highly encourage you to start enjoying the benefits of = Isotonix supplements to your diet. You'll be amazed at the mental and physical changes you'll experience.   Now.... git back on that horsie and RIDE!!! wooooooooohooooooooooooooo       Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & = Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely >   --part1_ca.8a6e405.29ce5be5_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Mike, <BR>I'm really sorry that your first experience in a chamber was not a = positive or successful one. &nbsp;&nbsp;But you did learn an important = lesson, that being, you must begin at the beginning and work yourself into = a profession. &nbsp;&nbsp;Perhaps you bit off too much too soon. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>It was very kind of Richard Schneider to allow you to participate in = such an undertaking. &nbsp;It also shows that he apparently had sufficient = trust in you that you would know when you had reached the stopping point. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>Not everyone can do everything. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;As you have = previously mentioned, your interest is in voicing which, for the most = part, it done from the floor. &nbsp;I would encourage to you behing anew, = perhaps at a slower pace, and conquer the more basic tasks before you = again hit the chambers. <BR> <BR>I sympathize with your feeling of failure, but urge you to use that = feeling as a growing experience and an opportunity for learning. <BR> <BR>I would also highly encourage you to start enjoying the benefits of = Isotonix supplements to your diet. &nbsp;You'll be amazed at the mental = and physical changes you'll experience. <BR> <BR>Now.... &nbsp;git back on that horsie and RIDE!!! = &nbsp;wooooooooohooooooooooooooo <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com &gt;<I> </I> <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres <I>&nbsp;</I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: = &nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi <BR>&lt; http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 + = http://prepaidlegal.com/go/brucecornely &nbsp;&gt;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_ca.8a6e405.29ce5be5_boundary--