PipeChat Digest #2783 - Friday, March 29, 2002
 
Fwd:  Anglican Hypochondria
  by "Paul Austin" <paul-austin@ntlworld.com>
Re: Gluck Pipe Organs
  by "STEVE BOURNIAS" <yfd4@hotmail.com>
test
  by "STEVE BOURNIAS" <yfd4@hotmail.com>
RE: hypocrisy
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Easter hymns
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
RE: The going rank rate?
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Tubamagna64  Pipe Organs
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
Re: Gluck Pipe Organs
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Maundy Thursday at you-know-where
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
JACK OSSEWAARDE HYMN CD (X POST)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Fwd: Anglican Hypochondria From: "Paul Austin" <paul-austin@ntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2002 10:59:54 +0000   CHANCELOPHOBIA:     A morbid fear of the front pews in church, especially of those near the = pulpit. The patient is struck by the attack at the church door and = collapses into the nearest back seat. Some churches keep first-aid kits, = presumably to cope with the crush at the back.     DOUBLE AURICULAR CLEARANCE:   A condition due to the simultaneous opening of both ear and ducts, = allowing sound to enter one ear and leave by the other. The condition is = acute when sound waves carrying warnings, admonitions, instructions, and = indeed often during Bible readings. Most likely to be suffered during any = notices given aloud, particularly when terms like 'Lent Self-Denial Box' = or 'Committed Giving Envelope' are used.     HOMILETIC SYNDROME:   A state of semi-trance, due to exposure of vocal sounds in church during = what is known as the sermon. It is hastened by a heavy scent of flowers = and inadequate lighting. The patient looses touch with reality and has no = perception of time lapse. In acute cases the patient becomes unconscious.     LITURGICAL APHASIA:   A sudden stoppage of the vocal organs during the Hymns and at the end of = prayers, resulting either in complete silence or in a thin reedy sound of = uncertain note. More common among males than females. Recovery is = apparently instant when patient given coffee after the service.        
(back) Subject: Re: Gluck Pipe Organs From: "STEVE BOURNIAS" <yfd4@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2002 12:40:36 +0000   Thank you for the information. I stand corrected on the "nick name" and I would be pleased to make a trip to New York City for the stated purpose = that you mention. Is there any particular installation that you would recommend =   that I see? Evidently you are familiar with these instruments I assume. Which one have you heard or played that you would suggest I visit in particular? Are there any available recordings that I could purchase in advance? Awaiting your kind response. I remain truly yours in Warren Ohio.     >From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Re: Tubamagna64 Pipe Organs >Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2002 00:16:42 -0600 > >>Could someone on this list provide a complete opus list of the >>builder who posts here regularly...I believe it is Tubamagna64 ? I >>am interested in seeing the total output of both new and rebuilt >>instruments from this very prolific commentator ........... Regards >>to all....Steve Bournias in Warren, Ohio...P>S> Where is the nearest >>instrument to my city so that I may inspect one of these rare >>instruments? > >Although there isn't an opus list on the site you can find his work >at: http://www.gluckorgelbau.com/ > >Mr. Gluck, whose correct email "nick" is TubaMagna" is a respected >builder and is also the Editor of the Journal of American >Organbuilding, the journal of the American Institute of >Organbuilders. We should all be very thankful that he takes the time >to respond to some of the threads that appear on these lists. I >would much rather read what he has to write than dozens of blabbering >posts that appear at times. > >BTW, the total output of a builder actually has no bearing on the >quality of their work as you seem to try to imply. Some of the >finest builders have rather small opus lists because they tend to >spend their time providing the finest craftsmanship that is available >rather than churning out instruments. > >And to answer your PS question - you might make it worth your while >to make a trip to New York City to see his work. > >David > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     the information. i stand corrected on the "nick name" and I would be = pleased to make a trip to New York City for the syted purpose that you mention>   _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at = http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp.    
(back) Subject: test From: "STEVE BOURNIAS" <yfd4@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2002 12:57:17 +0000           _________________________________________________________________ Join the world=92s largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail. http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: RE: hypocrisy From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2002 11:42:25 -0500   Ross Wards writes:   >The Biblical definition of a hypocrite is someone who pretends to be something he/she is not.   I'd add "... with no real desire to be who he pretends to be."   > A piece of polished marble, for example, tends to look like formica.   Or someone looks at a glorious sunset and says, "that's as pretty as a picture!"   > 1. no artificial flowers - they are hypocrites. I'd rather have a = branch off a tree, nothing but greenery, than the best silk or paper or plastic flowers   Percy Dearmer said as much in _The Parson's Handbook_ decades ago. One small parish in my checkered past decided to put two artificial trees in = the sanctuary, near the altar. I blanched and objected, but they didn't = listen. It was typical of other decisions. That was not my favorite place to = work. I don't like to see with kerosene candles, either, but it seems that a few otherwise very tasteful churches use them for processional torches and on stands-- not, I hope, on the altar.   > they must learn to use their voices and not rely on mikes and speakers.   And in buildings too large for the spoken voice to carry well enough, the first resort should be to chant. That's why one used to do it.   Doncha love it when one of the ministers dons a portable wireless mike in the sacristy a few minutes before the service and doesn't realize that = it's "live"? Then the whole congregation might learn what s/he really thinks = of the upcoming liturgy and those in it... this must be what they call "a sharing time."   >To return: if we permit the "hypocrisy" of artificial pianos, organs, flowers, voice use and so on, where will it end? Will I eventually email a sermon to 150 stay-at-homes, perhaps complete with DVD video of my = flailing arms?   Drive-up confessionals? Fed-exing the Sacrament to shut-ins? = Televangelism would once have been thought absurd, but it's common now.   Thanks for an edifying and entertaining post. But I'm afraid genuineness = is becoming a lost cause. Our lives have become so regimented by mass production and fragmented by bureaucracy that I suspect we no longer know what a whole human being is or was, and couldn't be one if we did.   An eloquent sermon that I heard last month, on the "last Sunday after the Epiphany" (aka Quinquagesima) connected the Transfiguration (observed per the lectionary) with Valentine's Day, which was upcoming later in the = week. Saints, the preacher said, are transfigured people through whom a heavenly light shines as through a window, and they help transfigure others. Then he told us about Saint Valentine, who was executed (crucified, as I = recall) for being a Christian.   Of course the preacher didn't go into the irony that this physician, who = has been officially revered for many centuries as a holy example, would be all but crucified again today. We wouldn't call it being a Christian, of course, but "unprofessional conduct" and "the appearance of impropriety" = in going out of his way to befriend a young female patient. Upstanding churchmen would probably be in the lead.      
(back) Subject: RE: Easter hymns From: "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2002 13:33:48 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0052_01C1D65D.30D43240 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <<<<Dangling between heaven and earth, she breathed, =93Please, God, no = broken limbs. =93It=92s Holy Week, and I have no substitute organist.=94 = Feeling her fingers slipping, she decided to step out on faith or fall from = grace.>>>>.   Well?????? What happened?   Diane S. -----also carefully trying to save hands and neck for at least this week     ------=3D_NextPart_000_0052_01C1D65D.30D43240 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4807.2300" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV> <P class=3D3DMsoNormal><SPAN=3D20 style=3D3D"FONT-SIZE: 12pt; COLOR: blue; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D260342518-28032002>&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;</SPAN>Dangling between =3D heaven and=3D20 earth, she breathed, &#8220;Please, God, no broken limbs.<SPAN=3D20 style=3D3D"mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; </SPAN>&#8220;It&#8217;s Holy Week, = =3D and I have no=3D20 substitute organist.&#8221;<SPAN style=3D3D"mso-spacerun: yes">&nbsp; =3D </SPAN>Feeling her=3D20 fingers slipping, she decided to step out on faith or fall from =3D grace.<SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D260342518-28032002>&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;.</SPAN></SPAN></P> <P class=3D3DMsoNormal><SPAN=3D20 style=3D3D"FONT-SIZE: 12pt; COLOR: blue; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D260342518-28032002>Well??????&nbsp; What happened?&nbsp;=3D20 </SPAN></SPAN></P> <P class=3D3DMsoNormal><SPAN=3D20 style=3D3D"FONT-SIZE: 12pt; COLOR: blue; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D260342518-28032002>Diane S.&nbsp; -----also =3D carefully&nbsp;trying to save=3D20 hands and neck for at least this week</SPAN></SPAN><FONT=3D20 face=3D3D"Times New Roman"><SPAN style=3D3D"FONT-SIZE: = 12pt"><?xml:namespace =3D prefix =3D3D o=3D20 ns =3D3D "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office"=3D20 /><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></SPAN></FONT></P></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0052_01C1D65D.30D43240--    
(back) Subject: RE: The going rank rate? From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2002 12:38:13 -0600   Peter: Talk to Sebastian (NYC) and to Petty Madden (NJ) and to Patrick Murphy = (PA). Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Oboe32@aol.com [mailto:Oboe32@aol.com] Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2002 4:48 PM To: Pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: The going rank rate?     Hey gang, I have accepted a new and larger church position to start in July. The church has an organ that was built by the retiring organist. The instrument is 14 ranks, 6 of which are mixtures, so that doesn't leave = much room for imagination! We are going to have to do something soon, and I'm interested in what the going rate on ranks is. The church needs to add = about 10 ranks to this thing to make it decent, at least! I'm also interested in builders in the NJ area. Any thoughts...   -pete Isherwood    
(back) Subject: Re: Tubamagna64 Pipe Organs From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2002 13:23:40 -0600   And ... he's playing a recital (at 1st Presby?) in NYC on April 14, IIRC from a recent TAO perusal. How many organbuilders can and would do that?   RJL         David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> 03/28/2002 12:16 AM Please respond to PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org>@SMTP@cchntmsd cc: Subject: Re: Tubamagna64 Pipe Organs     "TubaMagna" is a respected builder and is also the Editor of the Journal of American Organbuilding, the journal of the American Institute of Organbuilders. We should all be very thankful that he takes the time to respond to some of the threads that appear on these lists. I would much rather read what he has to write than dozens of blabbering posts that appear at times.   BTW, the total output of a builder actually has no bearing on the quality of their work as you seem to try to imply. Some of the finest builders have rather small opus lists because they tend to spend their time providing the finest craftsmanship that is available rather than churning out instruments.   And to answer your PS question - you might make it worth your while to make a trip to New York City to see his work.   David    
(back) Subject: Re: Gluck Pipe Organs From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2002 15:04:39 EST   Had Mr. Bournias' query been honest, honorable, and without agenda, he = would have asked me directly, in light of the fact that we met many times before =   his departure from New York. He certainly left an impression on the organbuilding and curatorial community here. I do not respond to infantile =   goading, especially when laced with bitterness and contempt. For those who =   GENUINELY want to know:   Gluck New York is a small shop of only five craftsmen, so our output is small. We currently do not have pipemaking facilities of our own, but have =   found several pipemakers who follow my scalings and instructions meticulously, and the pipes voice and finish beautifully. I am the = President Tonal Director. I manage neither the shop nor the business end of the operation -- I leave that to more capable people.   Our two current projects consume all of our efforts -- a II/24 for a = Catholic Church (Great in ruck position, Swell, Pedal, and floating Choir/Solo), = and a IV/135 for a synagogue which incorporates 66 ranks from the original instrument. I believe it is scheduled to be the cover feature for The American Organist sometime this coming winter (2003).   Well-meaning, well-intentioned, genuinely interested, nice people may make =   appointments with us to climb through the installation. They always meet = my staff (all four of them are professional opera singers, in addition to = being fine craftsmen, so they sometimes rotate out on tour). When we are all together, we get along very well -- two of them are even married to each other. A loyal, congenial, and conscientious staff are critical to a successful firm.   None of the instruments have been recorded to date. Two established performers have enquired and toured and auditioned the organs, although making a recording is easier said than done. Financing is the easiest = part; getting permission from a client, working out royalties, and the all-too-difficult distribution are just some of the hurdles. Negotiations = are nascent, but ongoing.   Our website is not really up and running, particularly since we have = become so busy. Photographs have been taken, but text has not been written and stoplists have not been annotated. Having just been appointed Editor of = the Journal of American Organbuilding, and having been asked to return to performing organ concerts again after an eighteen year hiatus, the website =   has not gotten its full share of attention. That shall be remedied in the coming months.   The remainder of our work consists of weekly or monthly curatorial = contracts with several area clients with exceptional choral programs. The = instruments are large (III/60, IV/84, IV/81, IV/135 to name a handful) and = mixture-laden, as are so many instruments in this area, and tuning and upkeep are = important to these clients. We are not a firm that can take on several hundred = tuning clients as some do. It simply isn't possible to give each client the attention they require or deserve.   We also tend to several smaller installations, including some nineteenth century mechanical action instruments which are awaiting funds for restoration. We also perform subcontract work, especially for pneumatic restoration, as well as "ghost voicing" for other firms and revoicing and tonal finishing of less successful instruments. We pray every day for the small jobs to come in, as the big monsters can be taxing. Small organs = often present greater artistic challenges.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck Gluck New York Restorers and Builders All music. No digits. Since 1985. New York City  
(back) Subject: Maundy Thursday at you-know-where From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2002 21:33:41 -0600   SAINT AGATHA'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 150 Circle Drive, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433     MAUNDY THURSDAY THE EVENING EUCHARIST OF THE LORD'S SUPPER   "The Liturgy of this evening is the beginning of the Sacred Three Days ("Triduum Sacrum") of the celebration of the Passion and Death of our Lord Jesus Christ. It begins a time of watching, waiting, and contemplation as we enter into the commemoration of the mystery of our redemption. The Gift of Love in the Sacrament of the Body and Blood of Jesus is the focus. Tonight's Gospel of His self-giving love in the washing of His Apostles' feet is a fitting symbol. The enthroning of the Blessed Sacrament on the Altar of Repose throughout the night, and the continuation of this liturgy with that of Good Friday tomorrow, has the timelessness of silence - the silence of God."     Service music Willan   Prelude - Herzliebster Jesu - Johannes Brahms Introit Hymn - Draw nigh and take the Body of the Lord (Song 46) - H 328 Sequence Hymn - There is a green hill far away (Horsley) - H 167 Offertory Hymn - When I survey the wondrous cross (Rockingham) - H 474 Eucharistic Prayer D Music during Communion: He was despised - G. F. Handel PROCESSION TO THE ALTAR OF REPOSE Hymn - Now, my tongue, the mystery telling (Grafton) - H 331 THE STRIPPING OF THE ALTAR The People stand to recite Psalm 22   After a period of silent prayer, the People leave in silence.   Well, "my eyes for beauty pine", as the verse goes. I truly felt a much milder version of what Christ must have felt - the discouragement, anxiety and sheer dread of what he faced was weakly mirrored in our service tonight. Except that today Christ must contend not with the hot passion of hatred, but the cold indifference of those who haven't the time to be still and know, and those who haven't the time to make such a service a beautiful memorial to the time that we honor. This was evident in the attendance and the quality of our service, much of which felt like an organ solo for lack of participation. I remembered past services with veiled crosses, sung Eucharist, and a sense of the drama that this service deserves. That, I fear, I may never see again.   I eagerly scan others' narratives of their services this week, in order to fill the void. Thankfully, I have persuaded the priest that we should have no more organ music until Easter morning (and appreciate that discussion on the list).   May you all have a meaningful Passover/Holy Week/Easter, and may your Exsultets resound through the hearts and minds of the hearers. Pray for the peace of God to descend.   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: JACK OSSEWAARDE HYMN CD (X POST) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 01:11:28 EST   Does anyone know if the double CD set entitles "Great Hymns: The Organ of =   St. Bartholomew's Church" as played by Jack Ossewaarde is still available = and from where it can be purchased?   Any assistance will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!   Scott Foppiano