PipeChat Digest #2830 - Wednesday, May 1, 2002
 
Re: Broken bones and theremins
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Birthday Recital
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Birthday Recital
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
RE: Birthday Recital
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Recital: Cathedral, Garden City, LI, NY: Meredith E. Baker May 2, 12:
  by "WDBabcock" <WDBabcock@msn.com>
re: Recital: Cathedral, Garden City, LI, NY: Meredith E. Baker May 2, 12:
  by <patmai@juno.com>
Nilson
  by "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
RE: a shot across the bow from the Rector
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Nilson
  by "Petri Vahatalo" <petri.vahatalo@dlc.fi>
SORTA OFF-TOPIC: liturgical esoterica
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: SORTA OFF-TOPIC: liturgical esoterica
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Broken bones and theremins From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 06:14:57 EDT     --part1_132.d255cce.2a011a21_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Glenda, Sorry about your injury. Two pieces of advice:   DAY   OFF !!   The dosage may be multiplied if necessary. Hope you heal soon. Why = don't you give the church two weeks notice and then take your vacation? We = will light candles for you and add your name to BCP28 prayers!!   b   --part1_132.d255cce.2a011a21_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Glenda, <BR> Sorry about your injury.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Two pieces of advice:<BR> <BR> DAY<BR> <BR> OFF !!<BR> <BR> The dosage may be multiplied if necessary.&nbsp;&nbsp; Hope you heal = soon.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Why don't you give the church two weeks notice and = then take your vacation?&nbsp;&nbsp; We will light candles for you and add = your name to BCP28 prayers!!<BR> <BR> b</FONT></HTML>   --part1_132.d255cce.2a011a21_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Birthday Recital From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 06:26:14 EDT     --part1_5b.271e7cff.2a011cc6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/1/02 2:05:07 AM Atlantic Daylight Time, harfo32@hotmail.com writes: > It has an organ "stop" - which goes down > to AAAAA (?) anyway the full compass of a piano keyboard - with a very > authentic sounding 32' reed + the first three notes of a 64'.   Is this "stop" full organ only? Is there any way to vary it?   bruce   --part1_5b.271e7cff.2a011cc6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 5/1/02 2:05:07 AM Atlantic = Daylight Time, harfo32@hotmail.com writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">It has an organ = "stop" - which goes down<BR> to AAAAA (?) anyway the full compass of a piano keyboard - with a very<BR> authentic sounding 32' reed + the first three notes of a 64'. = </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> Is this "stop" full organ only?&nbsp;&nbsp; Is there any way to vary = it?<BR> <BR> bruce</FONT></HTML>   --part1_5b.271e7cff.2a011cc6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Birthday Recital From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 14:10:38 +0300   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0013_01C1F119.F88DBF00 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   It's "full organ" only! There is another button to press called =3D "variation" which produces a rather feeble slow speaking diapason type =3D sound for which I have little use, but the "strings" button gives quite = =3D a rich "Violone" type bass which is useful, both in duets and in =3D record/playback mode - i.e. you can record the manual parts of a piece =3D and then replay it, adding the pedals. John Foss ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Cremona502@cs.com=3D20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2002 1:26 PM Subject: Re: Birthday Recital     In a message dated 5/1/02 2:05:07 AM Atlantic Daylight Time, =3D harfo32@hotmail.com writes:=3D20   It has an organ "stop" - which goes down to AAAAA (?) anyway the full compass of a piano keyboard - with a =3D very authentic sounding 32' reed + the first three notes of a 64'.=3D20     Is this "stop" full organ only? Is there any way to vary it?   bruce=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0013_01C1F119.F88DBF00 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2715.400" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>It's "full organ" only! There is =3D another button to=3D20 press called "variation" which produces a rather feeble slow speaking =3D diapason=3D20 type sound&nbsp;for which I have little use, but the "strings" button =3D gives=3D20 quite a rich "Violone" type bass which is useful, both in duets and = in=3D20 record/playback mode - i.e. you can record the manual parts of a piece =3D and then=3D20 replay it, adding the pedals.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>John Foss</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A title=3D3DCremona502@cs.com=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:Cremona502@cs.com">Cremona502@cs.com</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A =3D title=3D3Dpipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Wednesday, May 01, 2002 = =3D 1:26=3D20 PM</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: Birthday =3D Recital</DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT lang=3D3D0 =3D face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2=3D20 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF">In a message dated 5/1/02 2:05:07 AM Atlantic =3D Daylight=3D20 Time, <A href=3D3D"mailto:harfo32@hotmail.com">harfo32@hotmail.com</A> = =3D writes:=3D20 <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px = =3D solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"=3D20 TYPE=3D3D"CITE">It has an organ "stop" - which goes down<BR>to AAAAA (?) = =3D anyway=3D20 the full compass of a piano keyboard - with a very<BR>authentic =3D sounding 32'=3D20 reed + the first three notes of a 64'. </BLOCKQUOTE><BR><BR>Is this = =3D "stop"=3D20 full organ only?&nbsp;&nbsp; Is there any way to vary =3D it?<BR><BR>bruce</FONT>=3D20 </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0013_01C1F119.F88DBF00--  
(back) Subject: RE: Birthday Recital From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 09:09:54 -0400   Now that my wider ignorance has been narrowed a bit by the lovely folks on this list whereby I now know that a Frobenius isn't a dessert nor is it a digital/electronic organ (eeeeeeek!!!) it's too bad you can't have one = there for your birthday. Cheers, Robert   -----Original Message----- From: John Foss [mailto:harfo32@hotmail.com] Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2002 1:04 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Birthday Recital     Thank you for the good wishes. My first choice would be a Frobenius, because the two most beautifully musical instruments I have ever played are the Frobenius Organs in The Danish Seaman's Chapel in East London - 1 manual, 5 stops - and Queen's College Chapel, Oxford.(II/22) Incidentally - re organ enhancement, keyboard and pedal - I have, amongst other things, a Yamaha electronic piano. It's brilliant! Never goes out of tune and other than a Bechstein or a Bluthner - or maybe a Bosendorfer - sounds better than the real thing! It has an organ "stop" - which goes = down to AAAAA (?) anyway the full compass of a piano keyboard - with a very authentic sounding 32' reed + the first three notes of a 64'. Played in concert with the viscount the last chords of loud and exciting pieces have an added dimension. John Foss   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Recital: Cathedral, Garden City, LI, NY: Meredith E. Baker May 2, 12:15 PM (X-post) From: "WDBabcock" <WDBabcock@msn.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 08:49:31 -0500   Is the Copland arrangement published? If so, by whom? If not how many pounds of chocolate would it take to get a copy of the arrangement? Looking at the light at the end of the tunnel and hoping it's not a train approaching. Bill ----- Original Message ----- From: <patmai@juno.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2002 12:09 AM Subject: Recital: Cathedral, Garden City, LI, NY: Meredith E. Baker May 2, 12:15 PM (X-post)     > You are invited to attend the Noon Recital Series (which really starts > at 12:15 PM, according to the artist) at the Cathedral of the > Incarnation, Garden City, Long Island, New York, Thursday, May 2. > > My colleague (since 1991) Meredith Elaine Baker, Organist-Choirmaster > at Most Holy Trinity Chapel, West Point, NY, will play: > > Trio Sonata No. 1 in E Flat Major BWV 525 J. S. Bach (1685-1750) > (Allegro moderato) > Adagio > Allegro > > Fantaisie in A Major Cesar Franck (1822-1890) > > Sonate II (1937) Paul Hindemith (1895-1963) > Lebhaft > Ruhig bewegt > Fuge > Massig bewegt, heiter > > Fanfare for the Common Man (1942) Aaron Copland (1900-1990) > arranged for organ by Meredith Elaine > Baker > > Meredith Elaine Baker > Director of Music > Most Holy Trinity Chapel > http://www.dean.usma.edu/catholicchoir > http://www.lics.org > > Free admission - free parking - just 1 block from the Garden City LIRR > station > > Hope that you can be present; I cannot, since I shall be observing an > interval between two funerals/memorial services that day at West Point. > > Pat Maimone > Post Chapel, West Point, NY > yp6867@usma.edu > patmai@juno.com > > ________________________________________________________________ > GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! > Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! > Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: > http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: re: Recital: Cathedral, Garden City, LI, NY: Meredith E. Baker May 2, 12:15 PM (X-post) From: <patmai@juno.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 10:52:37 -0400   Dear Bill,   >Is the Copland arrangement published? Alas, no.. >If not how many pounds of chocolate would it take to get a copy of the arrangement? You would need to ask that delightful question of Meredith, the artist and arranger. Please write to her (she prefers being addressed as Miss Baker rather than Ms. Baker) at MBaker@lics.org.   Pat Maimone Post Chapel, West Point, NY III/57 Aeolian-Skinner/Moeller console/Gress-Miles patmai@juno.com   ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.  
(back) Subject: Nilson From: "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Wed, 01 May 2002 13:43:27 -0300   Hi, Please, someone knows Nilson's first name and where can I find online his biography? L. Nilson wrote "A System of Technical Studies in Pedal Playing for the organ".   Thanks, Domitila    
(back) Subject: RE: a shot across the bow from the Rector From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 12:51:23 -0400   Dear Bud:   It sounds as though the rector sees the minor propers as congregational portions of the service. My opinion is that they are, on the contrary, = the very *essence* of the choir's contribution to the liturgy *qua choir*. What do you think? I must defer to your erudition, but I expect you will agree. To bring the possibilities of setting them down to what an = untrained congregation can handle is a terrible impoverishment and usurpation. Take the choir's role in the minor propers away, and you leave them only with ad-hoc, extra-liturgical embellishments such that it becomes a relatively frivolous consideration whether they are even present or not.   Furthermore, the Gregorian chant settings of the minor propers are the = heart and soul of the whole Gregorian repertoire. And of these, the graduals = are the most elaborate. Is this the repertoire you are trying to maintain? = I'd love to think so, but can hardly believe it: If you can do it, you are to = be admired and congratulated as a charismatic choirmaster, because singing a full, melismatic plainsong gradual is quite out of reach of most choirs. These graduals weren't sung even at S. Clement's, Philadelphia for a long time, even now they are not always done, and when they are, the all-professional choir reads them from modern notation. (I've ventured = Mr. Conte the suggestion once or twice that he might find it easier in the = long run to teach them the original Roman choral notation, embodying as it does interpretational nuances, but who am I to advise him-- doubtless he knows what he is doing. Nothing succeeds like success.)   I can (reluctantly) understand eliminating some or all of the minor = propers, but for the life of me I cannot understand keeping them but insisting that they become congregational.   On the other hand, I don't understand your reluctance to introduce more variety in mass ordinary settings. A few months back we were discussing possibilities on the list, and didn't you say you like "anything but" Merbecke and Willan, the two you are now defending? What dots am I not connecting? If you believe in choral settings of the ordinary (as I certainly do), can you work out a compromise: choral setting once a month, congregational the rest of the time? I think that this would be a good balance between giving the congregation their right to participate = audibly, and not depriving them altogether of the glories of the church's musical heritage. Both of these are important considerations, and I firmly = believe that to go all one way or all the other is an extreme and dogmatic stance that can be justified only by the presence of alternatives, either in = other parishes or in other Sunday services at the same parish. (Nowadays, of course, 99.9% of the time it's the choral settings that lose out.)   As both organist and congregant, I find one communion hymn very = appropriate, but more than one a noxious nuisance. As organist, I want the opportunity to play at least one communion voluntary. As congregant, I want the opportunity for quiet prayer and reflection. All too many churches now = seem to regard the congregation as a bunch of hyperactive middle schoolers who are going to get into mischief unless they are kept busy every minute with structured activities. This is INSULTING!!!   Furthermore, singing a hymn properly is physical hard work, and to sing = two hymns properly one after the other is not twice as much physical hard work but more like four times as much, and to do so on one's knees makes it harder still. This is ABUSIVE!!!   I'm with C.S. Lewis, who found the voice of God more like the purity and elaborate counterpoint of a choir than the bawling of a congregation, and who disliked a liturgy "waterlogged" with hymns. Three or four in a service are quite enough. But in the rector's defense, I heard him merely allowing you to use two communion hymns if the choir wasn't ready to do a motet; it wasn't a directive, was it?        
(back) Subject: Re: Nilson From: "Petri Vahatalo" <petri.vahatalo@dlc.fi> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 19:51:48 +0300   >Hi, >Please, someone knows Nilson's first name and where can I find online >his biography? L. Nilson wrote "A System of Technical Studies in Pedal >Playing for the organ". > >Thanks, >Domitila   John Henderson's excellent book has the following:   Nilson L. (Sweden, b. ca. 1830, d. 1904). A Wedding March by Lars Nilson is in Vox Candida [WES]. This may be the Lars Nilson, well known for his book about pedal technique, an organist living in Stockholm. However this is a common name in Sweden.   -Petri -- ..----------.----------.----------.----------.----------. Petri Vahatalo, Pharmacist Kuntokatu 21, FIN-15900 Lahti, Finland tel. +358 3 753 4101, fax +358 3 753 4102 mobile +358 50 64336, e-mail petri.vahatalo@dlc.fi ..----------.----------.----------.----------.----------.  
(back) Subject: SORTA OFF-TOPIC: liturgical esoterica From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 01 May 2002 10:34:07 -0700       "Emmons, Paul" wrote:   > Dear Bud: > > It sounds as though the rector sees the minor propers as congregational > portions of the service. My opinion is that they are, on the contrary, = the > very *essence* of the choir's contribution to the liturgy *qua choir*. > What do you think? I must defer to your erudition, but I expect you = will > agree.   Of course.   > To bring the possibilities of setting them down to what an untrained > congregation can handle is a terrible impoverishment and usurpation.   This is that odd mindset that's prevalent in a LOT of Anglican churches, = even ones with VERY good choirs. English Gradual II has virtually been = CANONIZED as the ONLY way to sing the Propers, even though Burgess in the preface = points out that it is a "fall-back" book for those choirs who can't ALWAYS prepare = ALL the chants of the Plainchant Gradual.   The rector views them as purely functional. When the action they cover is = done, THEY should be done. No thought that they make their own contribution to = the liturgy, and/or that they should be as BEAUTIFUL as possible.   > Take > the choir's role in the minor propers away, and you leave them only with > ad-hoc, extra-liturgical embellishments such that it becomes a = relatively > frivolous consideration whether they are even present or not.   Exactly. He'd be perfectly happy if all we did was a big crashy anthem at = the Offertory.   > Furthermore, the Gregorian chant settings of the minor propers are the = heart > and soul of the whole Gregorian repertoire.   He hates all things medieval. The Gregorian melodies are not, for the most = part, "appropriate." Go figure ... we sing Gregorian everything ELSE with no = problem .... hymns, psalms, antiphons at the occasional liturgies, etc.   > And of these, the graduals are > the most elaborate. Is this the repertoire you are trying to maintain? = I'd > love to think so, but can hardly believe it: If you can do it, you are = to be > admired and congratulated as a charismatic choirmaster, because singing = a > full, melismatic plainsong gradual is quite out of reach of most choirs. > These graduals weren't sung even at S. Clement's, Philadelphia for a = long > time, even now they are not always done, and when they are, the > all-professional choir reads them from modern notation. (I've ventured = Mr. > Conte the suggestion once or twice that he might find it easier in the = long > run to teach them the original Roman choral notation, embodying as it = does > interpretational nuances, but who am I to advise him-- doubtless he = knows > what he is doing. Nothing succeeds like success.)   Although my choir could SING them, I'd NEVER propose to sing the original melodies of the Gradual, or of the Alleluia VERSES, except maybe at a = week-day Solemn Mass in the evening that was announced as a special event. I'm = content to preserve the Alleluia melodies, and do the rest to Willan, fauxbourdon, = solemn psalmody, or whatever.   > I can (reluctantly) understand eliminating some or all of the minor = propers, > but for the life of me I cannot understand keeping them but insisting = that > they become congregational.   Here's the odd thing: when they were doing English Gradual II BEFORE I = came, they never WERE. This business about the congregation singing the Gloria = Patri of the Introit and the Alleluia is a red herring ... I WENT to Mass at St. Matthew's before I took the position, and the choir sang EVERYTHING, = except for the HYMNS. The congregation took NO part in the Ordinary (Mass IX) OR the Propers.   > On the other hand, I don't understand your reluctance to introduce more > variety in mass ordinary settings. A few months back we were discussing > possibilities on the list, and didn't you say you like "anything but" > Merbecke and Willan, the two you are now defending? What dots am I not > connecting?   Because I'm tired of fighting about it. I'd have 52+ different Settings = (as I did at Old St. Mary's) if it was up to me, and the choir could easily = build up that many in a few years' time ... and/or I'd be perfectly willing to alternate between congregational settings and choral settings, and/or do what we did = at Holy Trinity: congregational settings on Sunday, and choral settings on = week-day Holy Days, as there was always a Low Mass in addition that people could go = to if they didn't want to go to a choral High Mass. But the Rector is having = none of compromising on THAT issue, AFTER telling me in January that we COULD have choral settings at the 11:00 High Mass.   > If you believe in choral settings of the ordinary (as I > certainly do), can you work out a compromise: choral setting once a = month, > congregational the rest of the time? I think that this would be a good > balance between giving the congregation their right to participate = audibly, > and not depriving them altogether of the glories of the church's musical > heritage. Both of these are important considerations, and I firmly = believe > that to go all one way or all the other is an extreme and dogmatic = stance > that can be justified only by the presence of alternatives, either in = other > parishes or in other Sunday services at the same parish. (Nowadays, of > course, 99.9% of the time it's the choral settings that lose out.)   That was SUPPOSED to be the plan: congregational settings (Willan and = Merbecke) at the 9:00 Family Mass, and whatever I liked at the High Mass. But he = changed his mind AGAIN.   > As both organist and congregant, I find one communion hymn very = appropriate, > but more than one a noxious nuisance. As organist, I want the = opportunity > to play at least one communion voluntary. As congregant, I want the > opportunity for quiet prayer and reflection. All too many churches now = seem > to regard the congregation as a bunch of hyperactive middle schoolers = who > are going to get into mischief unless they are kept busy every minute = with > structured activities. This is INSULTING!!!   I don't particulary care ... except that our people won't sing until = everybody gets back from Communion, so the "Communion" hymn in effect is an ablutions/thanksgiving hymn. I don't know quite what his comment about = THAT was all about ... he's never particularly cared WHAT we did during Communion = ... Psalm, anthem, hymn by the choir, organ music ... as long as it was = appropriate.   > Furthermore, singing a hymn properly is physical hard work, and to sing = two > hymns properly one after the other is not twice as much physical hard = work > but more like four times as much, and to do so on one's knees makes it > harder still. This is ABUSIVE!!!   Well, the choir doesn't kneel (grin). We're in the back, and there's no = ROOM for kneelers. Nor will there be in the choir loft of the new church ... the = loft is only 14' deep ... that will BARELY fit two rows of risers with chairs, and = the organ console. Plus about half of my choir CAN'T kneel ANYWAY because of = various physical infirmities, spare parts, etc.   > I'm with C.S. Lewis, who found the voice of God more like the purity and > elaborate counterpoint of a choir than the bawling of a congregation, = and > who disliked a liturgy "waterlogged" with hymns. Three or four in a > service are quite enough. But in the rector's defense, I heard him = merely > allowing you to use two communion hymns if the choir wasn't ready to do = a > motet; it wasn't a directive, was it? > >   I have to quote that to him ... C.S. Lewis is one of his heroes (grin).   I am REALLY puzzled by all that ... that's precisely what we do NOW if we = don't have an anthem ready: we sing a hymn, usually something that's not in the = 1940, and the choir sings it alone. Perhaps he was saying that if it was GOING = to be a hymn, rather than an anthem, he'd prefer that the whole congregation sing = it (which they WON'T, if communion is still going on). I don't see how it = would work in practice ... typically we ditch the communion motet and substitute = a hymn only at the last minute, if choir members don't show up because of = sudden illness, etc. ... so I'd have to announce a second hymn, as it wouldn't be = in the service-leaflet.   Ah well ... this too shall pass eventually, until the NEXT dust-up.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: SORTA OFF-TOPIC: liturgical esoterica From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 16:45:34 -0400   Dear Bud:   For settings of the introit and gradual, have you ever seen the series published for the Lutheran rite by Augsburg in at least three volumes in = the 1960s? I was very taken with them at the time, probably more than I = should have been considering their musical value overall (the world view = resulting from a small-town Wisconsin upbringing can require awhile to expand)-- but I'd still say that some of them are very attractive for a volunteer choir with limited resources but a commitment to the propers.   Various composers contributed, including those you would expect, e.g Paul Manz, Jan Bender, Leland Sateren, and (probably my favorite) Ludwig Lenel. I think you would be interested in having a copy for your own collection even if you didn't decide on a set for the whole choir. Except for = matters of translation, as I recall the texts are usually the same as in our = missal. They would be good for variety among the other possibilities. They are brief but, taken as a whole, colorful. Using a few from time to time = might show that the choir takes the propers not perfunctorily but seriously, and that imaginative yet functional settings for them are a living tradition.   Unfortunately they are long out of print, but perhaps you know a Lutheran parish that used to have liturgical integrity but has lost it (there are certainly more than enough RC and Episcopal churches like that) in whose choir library a set are gathering dust, and who would be glad to unload = them for a modest price.