PipeChat Digest #2831 - Wednesday, May 1, 2002
 
RE: Dumping the tuner
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: Dumping the tuner
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Birthday Recital
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Dumping the tuner
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Organ Duet repertoire
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
RE: my reply to the Rector
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
RE: From the sublime to the ridiculous
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: From the sublime to the ridiculous
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: SORTA OFF-TOPIC: liturgical esoterica
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Item for sale (x-posted)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Dumping the tuner
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: From the sublime to the ridiculous
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Already a stupid question . . .
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Dumping the tuner
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
New pipe organ in Waco, Texas
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Dumping the tuner From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 23:03:41 +0100   Hello,   Thats the problem, he doesn't tune it very well and, when I complain, he = claims that "someone has been messing around with it" (meaning me!). He = claims to have set the bearings many times, and yet Tenor G of the 8ft = Flute has been out of tune for 5 years. The problem is, the Great is = well elevated and needs a set of ladders.....I doubt that he brings any = with him!   He once "had a go" at the Flute pipes I re-voiced, but they were not = much better after he had tackled them. I suspect that he folded the big = ears inwards and re-adjusted the tuning at the conical caps of the = Koppel Flute......the ears thus became "harmonic bridges" in effect. It = induced some kind of unsatisfactory speech. The first thing I did was = to straighten the ears, whereupon half of the pipes failed to speak. = Most of the problem concerned the flueways, which had closed up. (Clumsy = handling?) Only three pipes needed languid adjustment, plus two Principal pipes = which were trying to overblow by a combination of an over-wide flueway = and the speech set a little too quick.   It's always a problem when your tuner is an old school friend, an = ex-colleague and, over the years, a bit of a family friend also! I have = tended to finish off the jobs he has done badly and draw a veil over his = shortcomings. He is OK on the mechanical side, and sets the action = nicely and carries out good repairs. Fortunately, apart from the = Positive (just above my head, in a small tone cabinet), the organ stays = in wonderful tune. The "tone cabinet" has doors which have to be closed = for security. The pipes get warm and the stoppers can move on the 8ft = Gedact......so I adjust them regularly. It seems to be a humidity = thing.Then he has the gall to accuse me of "tinkering"................   I could, of course, just punch him on the nose!   Perhaps our unoffical alliance can continue....he does the mechnical = part, I do the tuning and he gets the money! :)   Life is so difficult.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   PS: He "pinched" the pure tin pitch pipe of the 2ft Principal with his = fingers!!!!!!!!!      
(back) Subject: Re: Dumping the tuner From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 18:14:11 EDT   As a priest and friend of mine frequently said:   "Well it's very simple."   If he (or she) is not doing the job completely and the organ is not left = in excellent tune when the tuner leaves the building, then there is a = problem. This means that bearings (temperaments) in each division or as needed = should be set, depending on each individual, particular instrument, and NOT tuned = to the 4' octave on the Great without IT having a bearing set at EACH tuning. = If there are questions, address them and expect good answers within a reasonable amount of time. If things still do not improve and the tuning = is not to your satisfaction, make that known and put the tuner into a probationary status. If things improve, fine. If not, within a timeline specified by you (the organist), then release the tuner from his/her = contract and seek another technician.   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Re: Birthday Recital From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 18:14:42 EDT     --part1_135.db14daa.2a01c2d2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/1/02 8:11:19 AM Atlantic Daylight Time, harfo32@hotmail.com writes: > It's "full organ" only! There is another button to press called = "variation" > which produces a rather feeble slow speaking diapason type sound for = which > I have little use, but the "strings" button gives quite a rich "Violone" =   > type bass which is usefu >   Just a bit more curiosity. Is there a tuning feature (you knew I'd ask, =   right?). What kind of a price range?   Thankx.   bruce   Bruce in the Muttestery of St. Dogmael with the Baskerbeagles http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 "Snuffer--The Lighthouse Beagle" is now in print (she even visits a pipe =   organ!!)   --part1_135.db14daa.2a01c2d2_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 5/1/02 8:11:19 AM Atlantic = Daylight Time, harfo32@hotmail.com writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">It's "full organ" = only! There is another button to press called "variation" which produces a = rather feeble slow speaking diapason type sound for which I have little = use, but the "strings" button gives quite a rich "Violone" type bass which = is usefu</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: = #ffffff" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> Just a bit more curiosity.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Is there a tuning feature = (you knew I'd ask, right?).&nbsp;&nbsp; What kind of a price range?<BR> <BR> Thankx.<BR> <BR> bruce<BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery of St. Dogmael<BR> with the Baskerbeagles&nbsp; http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> "Snuffer--The Lighthouse Beagle"&nbsp; is now in print&nbsp; (she even = visits a pipe organ!!)</FONT></HTML>   --part1_135.db14daa.2a01c2d2_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Dumping the tuner From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Wed, 01 May 2002 17:22:03 -0500   Anyone who pinches pipes with their fingers to tune them does not deserve = to be let back in the organ, friend or not! The problem with tuning your = own organ without charging the church is that they will become accustomed = to that. When you leave, they will have difficulty picking up the = maintenance. I think you need to come clean with the church authorities = and ask for compensation yourself, if you are indeed qualified, or insist = on another organ technician. Roy Redman   cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk wrote:   > Hello, > > Thats the problem, he doesn't tune it very well and, when I complain, he = claims that "someone has been messing around with it" (meaning me!). He = claims to have set the bearings many times, and yet Tenor G of the 8ft = Flute has been out of tune for 5 years. The problem is, the Great is well = elevated and needs a set of ladders.....I doubt that he brings any with = him! > > He once "had a go" at the Flute pipes I re-voiced, but they were not = much better after he had tackled them. I suspect that he folded the big = ears inwards and re-adjusted the tuning at the conical caps of the Koppel = Flute......the ears thus became "harmonic bridges" in effect. It induced = some kind of unsatisfactory speech. The first thing I did was to = straighten the ears, whereupon half of the pipes failed to speak. Most of = the problem concerned the flueways, which had closed up. (Clumsy = handling?) > Only three pipes needed languid adjustment, plus two Principal pipes = which were trying to overblow by a combination of an over-wide flueway and = the speech set a little too quick. > > It's always a problem when your tuner is an old school friend, an = ex-colleague and, over the years, a bit of a family friend also! I have = tended to finish off the jobs he has done badly and draw a veil over his = shortcomings. He is OK on the mechanical side, and sets the action nicely = and carries out good repairs. Fortunately, apart from the Positive (just = above my head, in a small tone cabinet), the organ stays in wonderful = tune. The "tone cabinet" has doors which have to be closed for security. = The pipes get warm and the stoppers can move on the 8ft Gedact......so I = adjust them regularly. It seems to be a humidity thing.Then he has the = gall to accuse me of "tinkering"................ > > I could, of course, just punch him on the nose! > > Perhaps our unoffical alliance can continue....he does the mechnical = part, I do the tuning and he gets the money! :) > > Life is so difficult. > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell > UK > > PS: He "pinched" the pure tin pitch pipe of the 2ft Principal with his = fingers!!!!!!!!! > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Organ Duet repertoire From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 01 May 2002 18:00:15 -0400   Dear Good Helpful Folks, I'd be grateful for recommendations of repertoire, easy to moderate in difficulty, for two persons at one console: title, composer, publisher info. Could be serious or light. Thanx.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: RE: my reply to the Rector From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 23:29:13 +0100   Hello,   I think "Bud" and the Rectum are in danger of creating a "Missa = Incomprehensibulis" of bewildering complexity.   I'd start again and write a decent "Folk Mass" of my own, which could = then include choral melisma as the congregation became familiar with it.   And just a thought "Bud", there are no difficult modulations in = modes....just drop the bass of the underlying harmony a fourth, add a = few augmented intervals and just "go for it"....that's what the French = have done for years and we all call it "art". If you want to be "avante = garde", just change abruptly from one mode to the next.......a sort of = modern day "Surprise Symphony".   Better still, bring a hip flask and growl at everyone.   The French Organist, Jean Langlais, had a difficult time with the = clergy. There is a celebrated story concerning the start of HIgh Mass. = He improvised wonderfully as the procession entered, and tradition had = it that the clergy waited until the Maestro had concluded his = improvisation. On that particular occasion, the clergyman started to = recite the opening prayer as the organ still played. Without warning, = Langlais kicked open all the ventil pedals and fell onto the keys with = his arms outspread, then growled in English to my friend........   "Zis man is aye monster!"   Would you? Dare you? =20 My advice.....take up something gentle but go out of church with a = memorable "bang". The only time I ever did anything completely = outrageous (as a non-drinker) was when an absolutely "evil" clergyman = waffled on about "the evils of drink". I chose a setting by "Brewer" and = consumed a pint of Beer just so that I could breath on him after playing = the Norman Cocker "Tuba Tune"....he was a true alcoholic if ever there = was one!! :)   I just don't suffer clergy-fools gladly, I'm afraid.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK    
(back) Subject: RE: From the sublime to the ridiculous From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 23:42:41 +0100   Hello,   I'm being prolific this evening!   I was wondering how many "infamous" stories people may know concerning = organists.   Permit me to start the ball rolling with a story about Sir John Stainer = during his time at St.Paul's.   He fell asleep during the sermon one Sunday morning, waking up to find = the choir half way through the last hymn. Gently floating in on a very = quiet stop combination, he added more and more stops, eventually = reaching a thundering climax complete with major reeds and the 32ft = rumbling away.   After playing the final voluntary, he descended to the Choir Vestry, = where an astonished choir stood motionless in complete silence. Sir John = removed his cassock and surplice, placed his music in his case, took his = coat and placed it on his back, walked elegantly to the outside door, = opened it, placed his hat on his head and stepped outside. Then, bobbing = back in, he said, " Oh yes! Thank you gentlemen.....just the way I = wanted that last hymn!! Good morning to you!"   He was gone in an instant.     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     -----Original Message----- From: "pipechat@pipechat.org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> on behalf of = "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Sent: 01 May 2002 20:45 To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: RE: SORTA OFF-TOPIC: liturgical esoterica   Dear Bud:   For settings of the introit and gradual, have you ever seen the series published for the Lutheran rite by Augsburg in at least three volumes in = the 1960s? I was very taken with them at the time, probably more than I = should have been considering their musical value overall (the world view = resulting from a small-town Wisconsin upbringing can require awhile to expand)-- = but I'd still say that some of them are very attractive for a volunteer = choir with limited resources but a commitment to the propers.=20   Various composers contributed, including those you would expect, e.g = Paul Manz, Jan Bender, Leland Sateren, and (probably my favorite) Ludwig = Lenel. I think you would be interested in having a copy for your own collection even if you didn't decide on a set for the whole choir. Except for = matters of translation, as I recall the texts are usually the same as in our = missal. They would be good for variety among the other possibilities. They are brief but, taken as a whole, colorful. Using a few from time to time = might show that the choir takes the propers not perfunctorily but seriously, = and that imaginative yet functional settings for them are a living = tradition.   Unfortunately they are long out of print, but perhaps you know a = Lutheran parish that used to have liturgical integrity but has lost it (there are certainly more than enough RC and Episcopal churches like that) in whose choir library a set are gathering dust, and who would be glad to unload = them for a modest price.       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: From the sublime to the ridiculous From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 18:56:35 EDT     --part1_f9.1b8c5a96.2a01cca3_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   My favorite infamous organist story took place in a very staid = Presbyterian church. The organ console is in a pit against the "east" wall of the divided choir. This particular organist was very, very tired of people reaching into pockets and purses during the final stanza of the concluding =   hymn to retrieve their car keys. One Sunday morning he had had just = enough and at about the third measure he began playing the hymn with one hand and =   pedal, took his huge collection of building keys, and holding his hand = above his head "Texas style" jangled his keys like an insane zimblestern through =   the final stanza. It was all the choir could do to maintain composure, except that I think they're probably used to such outbreaks! He is one = of the funniest people I know.   Was he fired for this??? Noop! He is completing something like his forty-somethingth year at that church and this happened about twenty years =   ago.   Bruce in the Muttestery of St. Dogmael with the Baskerbeagles http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 "Snuffer--The Lighthouse Beagle" is now in print (she even visits a pipe =   organ!!)   --part1_f9.1b8c5a96.2a01cca3_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">My favorite infamous organist story took place = in a very staid Presbyterian church.&nbsp;&nbsp; The organ console is in a = pit against the "east" wall of the divided choir.&nbsp;&nbsp; This = particular organist was very, very tired of people reaching into pockets = and purses during the final stanza of the concluding hymn to retrieve = their car keys.&nbsp;&nbsp; One Sunday morning he had had just enough and = at about the third measure he began playing the hymn with one hand and = pedal, took his huge collection of building keys, and holding his hand = above his head "Texas style" jangled his keys like an insane zimblestern = through the final stanza.&nbsp;&nbsp; It was all the choir could do to = maintain composure, except that I think they're probably used to such = outbreaks!&nbsp;&nbsp; He is one of the funniest people I know.<BR> <BR> Was he fired for this???&nbsp; Noop!&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; He is completing = something like his forty-somethingth year at that church and this happened = about twenty years ago.<BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery of St. Dogmael<BR> with the Baskerbeagles&nbsp; http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> "Snuffer--The Lighthouse Beagle"&nbsp; is now in print&nbsp; (she even = visits a pipe organ!!)</FONT></HTML>   --part1_f9.1b8c5a96.2a01cca3_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: SORTA OFF-TOPIC: liturgical esoterica From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 01 May 2002 16:11:30 -0700       "Emmons, Paul" wrote:   > Dear Bud: > > For settings of the introit and gradual, have you ever seen the series > published for the Lutheran rite by Augsburg in at least three volumes in = the > 1960s? I was very taken with them at the time, probably more than I = should > have been considering their musical value overall (the world view = resulting > from a small-town Wisconsin upbringing can require awhile to expand)-- = but > I'd still say that some of them are very attractive for a volunteer = choir > with limited resources but a commitment to the propers. >   Yes, I had them at one time ... I think one or two volumes survived my = breaking up housekeeping some years ago.   There were also some small folios of Lutheran Propers by Wetzler (?).   The quality of the music in the Augsburg books was very uneven ... I = recall in particular one setting by a well-known Lutheran composer and editor that = was quite ghastly (grin).   It's been some years since I came across them, but as I recall, the GOOD = ones were rather too dissonant for us to use ... and then there's the problem = of having ONLY the Introits and Graduals in that style, and having to "fill = in" with something else for the Offertory and Communion.   By contrast, it's easy enough to compose Offertories and Communions in the = style of Dr. Willan's Introits and Graduals for the Church Year.   The problem isn't limited resources, or the choir's lack of commitment to = the propers, or their willingness to sing them ... THEY love them, and they = MISS them; they're quite willing to learn the original Gregorian melodies from = square notes.   The problem is that the choir is no longer AT the High Mass ... because = they all have children in Sunday School, they were more-or-less FORCED to move to = the 9 o'clock Family Low Mass when the Rector changed the schedule so that = Sunday School is DURING 9 o'clock Mass.   Sunday School USED to be BETWEEN Masses ... the choir brought their kids = to Sunday School, and we had our rehearsal.   The alternative is to bring their children to Sunday School at 9, and then = hang around until 10, when I get out of 9 o'clock Mass and can start a = rehearsal. THAT obviously doesn't work.   IF there were somebody else to play the 9 o'clock Mass, it wouldn't be a = problem .... we'd have our rehearsal from 9-10:30 on Sunday mornings, rather than = on a weekday night. But the Rector would never stand for it ... 9 o'clock is = the BIG Mass at this point, and he wants a choir at it.   I now have an EXCELLENT paid chanter (a baritone) at the High Mass; I HOPE = to build up a men's schola around him eventually. If not, then the plan is to = add a tenor next year, and then a soprano and alto the following year.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Item for sale (x-posted) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 19:48:50 -0500   Excuse my ignorance, but I have never heard of anything like this before = and wonder why anyone who went to the trouble and expense of making an electronic Trompette with copper resonators would not just get pipes in = the first place?   John Speller     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Keith B Williams" <keithbwill@juno.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2002 9:30 PM Subject: Item for sale (x-posted)     > For Sale: > Peterson Electronic 8' 61-note Trompette-en-Chamade. 10 years old. > Includes > tone generator, and two 4' x 1' x 1' "chests" (speakers) with 49 copper > "resonators" (actually 3" scale resonators from a chamade pattern made = by > > Wicks.) Cost $4,000 new. Available immediately in Terre Haute, IN    
(back) Subject: Re: Dumping the tuner From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 21:32:25 EDT   When preparing to take the examinations for the American Institute of Organbuilders, we were treated to a story about a church that had gone through a half a dozen tuners before realizing that the blower was = spinning in the wrong direction. A three-phase line had been rewired to handle = some exterior lighting, and the blower was spinning in the wrong direction, = making it impossible for all of the well-qualified tuners they had hired and = fired to do their jobs as perfectly as would be liked.  
(back) Subject: Re: From the sublime to the ridiculous From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 21:56:08 EDT   In a message dated 5/1/02 6:45:14 PM Eastern Daylight Time, cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk writes:   << I was wondering how many "infamous" stories people may know concerning organists. >>   There is the story about Virgil Fox putting the soprano in the swell box = of the organ at Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church here in Baltimore.  
(back) Subject: Already a stupid question . . . From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 20:57:24 -0500   To preface this, I have to give you a small litany, of course. I had roughed out my repertoire for the next 4 weeks. Thankfully, Rogation Sunday was all piano music except for the postlude, where I intended to insert the first movement of Mendelssohn's No. 1. The next three weeks were all organ music, roughly as follows and pending a woman's whim:   Sunday after Ascension: Handel's "Let the bright seraphim" and Bach's Presto from Concerto in G; Whitsunday - some movements from Durufle's "Veni Creator" variations (I've never played it, and didn't know how much time I would have, so could not expect to get it all in shape); Trinity Sunday - Adagio e dolce from Bach's Trio III and Fugue in G minor; Vaughan Williams' Rhosymedre (because the text in the 1982 hymnal focuses on the Trinity), and the Stars and Stripes Forever (because of Memorial Day and it is the favorite of a parishioner for whom I won't be playing it July 4).   However, I go to yet another doctor tomorrow for the diagnosis and prognosis, and doubt I'm going to be able to do any pedals, particularly if the foot goes into a cast. So tonight I was looking at piano alternatives, and planning for organ sans pedal.   Now to the stupid question - do you have trouble reading familiar music recast in an unfamiliar edition? I had a new Debussy volume through which I was reading tonight, but am so used to the Durand editions that I was having trouble reading music I used to do in my sleep - the notes were too round and fat (like me). Same with organ music - I was talked into buying the Novello (?) edition of the Mendelssohn sonatas back in 1996, and hated the new edition because the notes were TOO spread out. Isn't that weird? Or is that a normal psychological phenomenon? I just figured that it was a vestige of my childhood photographic memory which I lost in law school - that I "see" the music in my mind in a certain way.   Does anyone else suffer from this? If I am just crazy, just say so - I can take it.   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Re: Dumping the tuner From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 20:56:48 -0500   It does help, though, if besides being expert tuners, they know something about the way organs work. Presumably in the aforementioned incident the static reservoir or static flow regulator would not have been behaving as expected and this should have been an immediate clue that the blower was = not operating correctly. A few years back we at QPO were hired by a church in Arkansas that had gone through numerous tuners because none of them could get the organ in tune. It is always our habit on such occasions to ask "Why?", and it did not take us long to discover that when the Great reservoir came up it collided with the bearer supporting the Great chest. We changed this, and the organ has been easy to tune ever since. Whenever one comes across an organ that is badly out of tune, instead of just = tuning it, one should always ask, "Why?", and generally it is relatively easy to find the answer. And invariably finding the answer makes the job of = tuning it a lot shorter and easier.   John Speller   ---- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2002 8:32 PM Subject: Re: Dumping the tuner     > When preparing to take the examinations for the American Institute of > Organbuilders, we were treated to a story about a church that had gone > through a half a dozen tuners before realizing that the blower was spinning > in the wrong direction. A three-phase line had been rewired to handle some > exterior lighting, and the blower was spinning in the wrong direction, making > it impossible for all of the well-qualified tuners they had hired and fired > to do their jobs as perfectly as would be liked.      
(back) Subject: New pipe organ in Waco, Texas From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 May 2002 23:50:55 EDT   Hello to all,   Perhaps I am intruding into unwelcome waters but I was delighted to see a = new pipe organ being installed at St. Mark's Lutheran Church in Waco. Our = firm conducted a funeral at the church today and I managed to meet up with technicians from Range Organ Company of Mesquite, Texas, who is doing the work. The organ will be 3-manual and probably around 20 ranks. The = church previously had a Conn Classic with a few sets of Conn Pipes. As we were there to conduct a funeral - and the techs were attempting to get the = Great playable by Sunday - there was little time for conversation.   I shall obtain more details about this organ and post when more complete information is available. BTW, the church will sell the Conn privately so = if anyone is looking for an AGO console for practice, let me know and I will = put you in touch with the responsible parties. The old electronic is still in =   pretty good shape and can be purchased at a reasonable price.   Best wishes, Jim Pitts