PipeChat Digest #2833 - Friday, May 3, 2002
 
RTR FM
  by "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
RE: Organ Duet repertoire
  by "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@email.msn.com>
RE: Dumping the tuner (long)
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: Already NOT a stupid question . . .
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Organ Duet repertoire
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Organ Duet repertoire
  by "Joshua Edwards" <fbcorganist@charter.net>
Rosales Organ, St. James, Seattle
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Unfamiliar Edition Syndrome
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Unfamiliar Edition Syndrome
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Already NOT a stupid question . . .
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Unfamiliar Edition Syndrome
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Pagination and Original Editions
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RTR FM From: "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 02 May 2002 08:57:33 -0400   Saw this on the Theatre Organ list thought I would repost it here for those interested.   Mack     Subject: RTR FM Broadcasts Perth Saturday 4th May (Perth)     Hello all A reminder that the Theatre Organ Time program (60 minutes) is broadcast every Friday/Saturday from Perth on RTR FM 92.1 via RealAudio at the following times: WESTERN AUSTRALIA-Saturday 10.00am (GMT+8 hrs) (Note daylight saving does not operate in West Australia) AUSTRALIA Eastern Standard Time Saturday 12.00pm Central Standard Time (SA) Saturday 11.30am USA Eastern Standard Time Friday 9.00pm Central Standard Time Friday 8.00pm Mountain Standard Time Friday 7.00pm Pacific Standard Time Friday 6.00pm CANADA Manitoba Friday 8.00pm Alberta Friday 7.00pm British Columbia Friday 6.00pm NEW ZEALAND Saturday 3.00pm UK Saturday 2.00am THE NETHERLANDS Saturday 3.00am This week's show will include an interview with Sydney theatre organist Margaret Hall.   The show this week has a railway theme. Numbers include: Casey Jones, Night train, Iv'e been working on a railroad, Choo choo samba, Take the A Train, Coronation Scot, Alabamy Bound etc.   Artists to be heard are Al Melgard, Buddy Cole, Dwight Beecham, Jackie Brown, Ken Double, Don Simmons, George Blackmore, Jonas Nordwall, David Lowe   Join us online at: rtrfm.com.au John Fuhrmann  
(back) Subject: RE: Organ Duet repertoire From: "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@email.msn.com> Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 09:27:32 -0400   David C. Isele's "Zorgandum" (pub. by Hinshaw) is a moderately-difficult = yet delightful romp for four hands & four feet. In my experience it is a hit with audiences.       Mark L. Hopper Organist/Music Associate First Baptist Church Henderson, NC (Church) 252-438-3172 (Home) 252-492-6774 mahopper@bigfoot.com    
(back) Subject: RE: Dumping the tuner (long) From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 11:18:15 -0400     I have some vignettes that may be interesting for some. I and another tuner were sent out of town by my former employer charged = with the job of "re-regulating" the pipework of a 9 stop organ in a little = known church that, incidentally, has acoustics to die for. I understand the organist had been complaining that the organ was unsteady. We worked on a few pipes and nothing was improving, which got me thinking, "voicing and regulating are not entirely metaphysical pursuits, there has = to be a reason for this other than bad luck and the evil spirits that occasionally ruin my work". I placed my hand on the reservoir and it was trembling in direct proportion to the unsteadiness. We took the blower = apart and found a medium sized plastic bag had been sucked into the blower throwing the propeller slightly off balance. We removed the bag, checked = to make sure the blower was turning in the right direction, and everything = was fixed. Lesson learned: Don't have your blower placed in an unlooked pantry closet in the church kitchen. I recently acquired a tuning contract after the organist of a church complained that for the past year or so the organ wouldn't stay in tune = and he more-or-less blamed it on some defect in the ability of their present tuners. Being vain and prone to wishful thinking I concurred. I suggested = a full tuning (the temper was a mess) and promised to keep an eye open for irregularities as the Swell had been recently releathered by the tuners. I was playing the organ during a break in tuning and I engaged the Swell = Trem. Nothing apparently happened, but suddenly the tuning of the organ, with couplers drawn, went out of whack. I could just see inside the lighted chamber that the Swell concussion bellows were flapping around like a bat trapped in a facade pipe. I entered the chamber and heard the heartbeat sound of the Swell Trem. in the basement. The Swell Trem was indeed = working but the automatic shut-off action to the Swell concussion wasn't. It produced a very weird effect and once it was fixed the "tuning" problem disappeared. Lesson learned: Keep your eyes, ears and mind open (and don't necessarily think you're better than everyone else). I've acquired three tuning contracts in situations where the organs had = long histories of poor tuning and the blame had been placed on the tuners. In = all cases it had nothing to do with the tuners ability to properly tune. It = was the fault of the Schwimmers and I suppose by default, the fault of the tuners to continually overlook the problem. In situations like this, I = make sure the blower is wired correctly, then I remove the wind line to the schwimmer and push the regulating plate to one side, if it doesn't come = back to a plumb resting place quickly at least one problem has been discovered. After cleaning and re lubricating all ball joints involved the long = standing tuning problems in at least three separate instances disappeared. Lesson learned: Clean all ball joints and re lubricate every ten to twenty years = if your organ is fitted with Schwimmers. On another occasion before full tuning an organ that had a good tuning record but had just been cleaned, I checked to ensure the blower was = turning in the correct direction before starting. To my surprise, it wasn't and it was more than apparent that it had been that way since its' installation = in the 1950's. I corrected it, but strangely it didn't change the performance of the organ at all. Lesson learned: Direction of the blower doesn't = always count ( but make sure it's right anyways). And one more vignette where the tuner truly was bad or at least lazy. I was contracted to install a new 32' reed in a large and important organ that had a poor history with guest organists and anyone with an ear for tuning. The tuner had indicated to the church that he was not willing to install the 32'. That's one of the reasons why they contracted me. I worked the graveyard shift to install the pipes as the church is open = from 7am to 7pm and there were security issues I wished to avoid. One memorable day during the installation after I woke up form my mid-morning sleep I stumbled into the church to audit the monthly tuning. There are usually = 5-10 people in the church at any given moment and I was unrecognized by the = tuner and I made no attempt to introduce myself. I'd heard the usual stories all tuners have about each other and him in particular. As a result I had nick-named him "Dusty Walkboards". I wouldn't have believed the following = if I hadn't seen it myself. This organ has a compliment of 15 reed ranks. He tuned two reed ranks completely, re-tuned about three pedal 16'reed PIPES, and perhaps twenty reed PIPES in the Swell trumpet chorus, fixed a small reported problem in the console and left (I thought for lunch). Total time spent: about an = hour. I asked the verger if he knew what time the tuner was coming back to = finish. He looked at me strangely and said "he's finished". I explained that it usually took about four to five hours to do a proper monthly reed tuning = on an organ this size. He told me that he was usually faster than he was = today and exclaimed "that's why he's the best". Well, I now take care of this organ and I should remark that all the schwimmers were malfunctioning in various degrees. After cleaning the ball joints and applying a full-tuning to the organ it is, IMHO, much better. Lesson for organists: Audit or have someone audit a tuning once in a while and compare it with the ensuing invoice to see if you're getting your money's worth. You may be surprised! AjM      
(back) Subject: Re: Already NOT a stupid question . . . From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 11:26:19 EDT   Dearest Glenda:   You are not the first to experience Unfamiliar Edition Syndrome. Although fingering, especially when you've gotten a piece nearly memorized, is a habitual neurological sequence, so are the eye movements that go with it, = and all of the visual patterns you associate with playing the piece. Unless = there have been significant scholarly updates in the music (major corrections, = lost measures found, etc), it is most comforting to use the same edition one's entire life.   There may be a valid point in LEARNING to switch editions. That way, you = are adaptable, sure of the music, etc. But at our advanced ages, why learn new =   versions of the same tricks?   I can imagine what might happen if a student learned his Bach on the Widor-Schweitzer Schrimer Edition (note heads the size of olives, two measures per page) ended up at a conservatory where his teacher = "graduated" him to the Barenreiter or Peters (electron scanning microscope, entire = work on one page) editions.   Sebastian  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Duet repertoire From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Thu, 02 May 2002 15:40:44 -0400   Thanks. I was at Eastman with David, though I did not know him well. So this would be especially interesting to consider. I'll follow through.   Cordially,   Karl   > From: "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@email.msn.com> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 09:27:32 -0400 > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: RE: Organ Duet repertoire > > David C. Isele's "Zorgandum" (pub. by Hinshaw) is a moderately-difficult = yet > delightful romp for four hands & four feet. In my experience it is a = hit > with audiences. > > > > Mark L. Hopper > Organist/Music Associate > First Baptist Church > Henderson, NC > (Church) 252-438-3172 > (Home) 252-492-6774 > mahopper@bigfoot.com > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Duet repertoire From: "Joshua Edwards" <fbcorganist@charter.net> Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 16:05:57 -0400   You may want to try some of the Chenault's things. They are pretty = good.... especially the Stars and Stripes duet.   Josh Edwards FBC Seymour, TN   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, May 02, 2002 3:40 PM Subject: Re: Organ Duet repertoire     > Thanks. I was at Eastman with David, though I did not know him well. = So > this would be especially interesting to consider. I'll follow through. > > Cordially, > > Karl > > > From: "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@email.msn.com> > > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 09:27:32 -0400 > > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Subject: RE: Organ Duet repertoire > > > > David C. Isele's "Zorgandum" (pub. by Hinshaw) is a = moderately-difficult yet > > delightful romp for four hands & four feet. In my experience it is a hit > > with audiences. > > > > > > > > Mark L. Hopper > > Organist/Music Associate > > First Baptist Church > > Henderson, NC > > (Church) 252-438-3172 > > (Home) 252-492-6774 > > mahopper@bigfoot.com > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Rosales Organ, St. James, Seattle From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 18:27:19 -0400   OHS member Joseph Adam, winner of the 1991 St. Albans Competition, has = made a new CD of all-French repertoire on the new Rosales organ in the chancel = of St. James' RC Cathedral in Seattle, where he is organist. We who attended the AGO National there were blown away by the organ(s), the acoustics, and the music program at St. James, where Nicolas Kynaston played during the AGO. Joe's new CD is on the Gothic label and is available from OHS at http://www.ohscatalog.org   Also at St. James' is a wonderful and restored 3m Hutchings-Votey of 1907. It can be heard along with the new Rosales on a recent CD produced on the Pro-Organo label and also available from OHS. "Blending Voices" is the = name of the CD and Katherine Pardee is the organist.   Joe Adam has also recorded a solo album, "Melodia," on the Hutchings-Votey for the Loft label, also available from OHS.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Unfamiliar Edition Syndrome From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 18:42:27 -0500   What is weird about this syndrome with me is that it is not uniform as to size of notes or pages. I have learned what I know of the trio sonatas in the Dover facsimile of the entire organ works, with little teeny tiny notes, and actually prefer them that way. The Peters edition of the Mendelssohn has pretty round notes, but not too big. The Bill Little (isn't his last name Little? You see my memory does not include names) edition is too spread out. I actually like the Widor/Schweitzer on the P & Fs, I guess because those were the first editions I had. Then I sometimes take an edition and reduce it down to teeny-tiny notes to avoid page turns, and like that better than the larger notes. Go figure.   In response to Sybesma, I refuse to play in other clefs - I've just gotten too lazy. I might transpose a piece, particularly a hymn, in my head, but I just don't want to work that hard on a regular basis.   Yes, I am over the hill and accident prone to boot - wanna make something of it? Be careful - I might fall on you - it would be preferably to concrete. The only reason for me to learn new editions is when I can't find the old ones.   Glenda Sutton (who acts blonde so that people won't question the hair color, although no one believes me when I tell them that my hair turned that color, and not gray, naturally under stress)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TubaMagna@aol.com   Dearest Glenda:   You are not the first to experience Unfamiliar Edition Syndrome. Although fingering, especially when you've gotten a piece nearly memorized, is a habitual neurological sequence, so are the eye movements that go with it, and all of the visual patterns you associate with playing the piece.   <snip>   There may be a valid point in LEARNING to switch editions. That way, you are adaptable, sure of the music, etc. But at our advanced ages, why learn new versions of the same tricks?        
(back) Subject: Re: Unfamiliar Edition Syndrome From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Thu, 02 May 2002 20:42:27 -0400   on 5/2/02 7:42 PM, Glenda at gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com wrote:   > What is weird about this syndrome with me is that it is not uniform as > to size of notes or pages. I have learned what I know of the trio > sonatas in the Dover facsimile of the entire organ works, with little > teeny tiny notes, and actually prefer them that way. The Peters edition > of the Mendelssohn has pretty round notes, but not too big. The Bill > Little (isn't his last name Little? You see my memory does not include > names) edition is too spread out. I actually like the Widor/Schweitzer > on the P & Fs, I guess because those were the first editions I had. > Then I sometimes take an edition and reduce it down to teeny-tiny notes > to avoid page turns, and like that better than the larger notes. Go > figure. >=20   One problem I have with editions that use a lot of space (like the Kevin Mayhew Bach edition) is that I forget accidentals later in the measure because the original accidental is to the left of my field of vision.   While we're on the subject, how do other people solve page turning difficulties? I'm working on Eug=E8ne Reuchsel's "Jour de F=EAte aux Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer" and there just is no moment where one can pause t= o turn a page, even if one xeroxes the pages and tapes them together so as to get three or four visible at a time. I finally resorted to reducing each page to somewhere between 50% and 70%, cutting the copies apart and placing page one on top of page two, then in another column page three on top of page four, and so forth, and copying all that on longer paper, then taping them together into one big sheet so that the original eight pages can all b= e seen at once. The notes are not almost too tiny to read, but not quite. This kind of problem discourages me from learning a piece like Paul Piern=E9'= s Toccata, with 8 page turns of which only one is doable without leaving out notes.   Put it this way: How many of you leave out notes in order to get your page= s turned without adding extra beats?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Already NOT a stupid question . . . From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 19:48:32 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <PIPORG-L@LISTSERV.ALBANY.EDU>; <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, May 02, 2002 10:26 AM Subject: Re: Already NOT a stupid question . . .     > You are not the first to experience Unfamiliar Edition Syndrome. = Although > fingering, especially when you've gotten a piece nearly memorized, is a > habitual neurological sequence, so are the eye movements that go with = it, and > all of the visual patterns you associate with playing the piece. Unless there > have been significant scholarly updates in the music (major corrections, lost > measures found, etc), it is most comforting to use the same edition = one's > entire life.   I was discussing this very question a while back with a distinguished musician (not an organist) who is chair of the music department at a major university. He and I feel that there is a lot more to this whole question than even you suggest. In fact the way the editor lays out the score -- even down to where the page-turns are -- exerts a big influence on such factors as the fingering organists use, and this in turn affects the phrasing and thus the whole interpretation of the piece. As a result of experiencing this at first hand I have become a big fan of using the original edition whenever possible. I am not one of the world's great organists <g>, but even I have noticed a big difference in the way I play one of my favorite pieces, when I use a facsimile of the original edition versus when I use a modern edition. This the Voluntary No. 5 in G from William Walond's Opus 1. The original edition uses the alto clef as well = as bass and treble clefs, and I even find that this influences my fingering, phrasing, and indeed my whole approach to interpreting the piece.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Unfamiliar Edition Syndrome From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 21:58:07 EDT     --part1_148.de7bed1.2a0348af_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Randy, Occasionally there is a place in the middle of the page that is convenient =   for a page turn. I copy the page and then either tape the copy to the = outer edge of the page, or just let is rest on the music rack until I need it. =   The latter is the easiest method since it does not produce a very long = page to turn. Other times I tape the needed portion of the page to the top of =   the page. When this is done it also helps to block out the no longer = needed portions of the following page (although not in a permament way).   Occasionally, I will leave out notes for a page turn if it does not make = an obvious difference. Very occasionally I discover that an extra note can = be played in the pedal part to compensate.   Bruce in the Muttestery of St. Dogmael with the Baskerbeagles http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 "Snuffer--The Lighthouse Beagle" is now in print (she even visits a pipe =   organ!!)   --part1_148.de7bed1.2a0348af_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Randy, <BR> Occasionally there is a place in the middle of the page that is convenient = for a page turn.&nbsp;&nbsp; I copy the page and then either tape the copy = to the outer edge of the page, or just let is rest on the music rack until = I need it.&nbsp;&nbsp; The latter is the easiest method since it does not = produce a very long page to turn.&nbsp;&nbsp; Other times I tape the = needed portion of the page to the top of the page.&nbsp;&nbsp; When this = is done it also helps to block out the no longer needed&nbsp; portions of = the following page (although not in a permament way). <BR> <BR> Occasionally, I will leave out notes for a page turn if it does not make = an obvious difference.&nbsp;&nbsp; Very occasionally I discover that an = extra note can be played in the pedal part to compensate.<BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery of St. Dogmael<BR> with the Baskerbeagles&nbsp; http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> "Snuffer--The Lighthouse Beagle"&nbsp; is now in print&nbsp; (she even = visits a pipe organ!!)</FONT></HTML>   --part1_148.de7bed1.2a0348af_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Pagination and Original Editions From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 23:10:08 EDT   John Speller brings up an interesting and valid point. Obviously, in editions of 18th century music, which were always hand-copied at the time, pagination varied, and we don't know whether the copyists duplicated the composer's pagination or not. We must remember that one couldn't just purchase music paper at the = time. Paper was a rarer commodity then, and had to be ruled by hand. How much = did this influence the number of notes a composer was willing to squeeze onto = a leaf? On the other hand, as we get into more recent centuries, during which = the composers were involved with first editions and engraving, how much = influence did the COMPOSERS have, versus the editors, on where page breaks, page = turns, and even the spacing of staves occurred? Was it the composer's choice to have a horizontal, 3-brace format, or = a vertical, 4-brace format? It is interesting to note that the Orgel-Buchlein was bound and ruled = and numbered so that each piece would fit on only one or two pages; some = pages were left blank and skipped, and although Bach never finished the project, =   completing only 45 of them, pagination was, in fact, a factor.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City Editor, The Journal of American Organbuilder Official Publication of the American Institute of Organbuilders (http://www.pipeorgan.org) Join the AIO in Los Angeles this October for our annual convention See all those BIG organs up close and privately...