PipeChat Digest #2837 - Sunday, May 5, 2002
 
interesting eBay item
  by <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Rogation Day and it's hot here!
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Used Organ Music...
  by "Bob and Jane Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net>
Coming back into society at last
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com>
Craig S. Williams: Cadet Chapel, West Point, NY May 12, 3 PM (x-post)
  by <patmai@juno.com>
A Messiaen setback
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Messiaen
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: A Messiaen setback
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: A Messiaen setback
  by "Bob Grube" <rkirkman@att.net>
Thank you to Michael Barone and Pipedreams
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Fisk Opus 119 - Gainesville FL
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: interesting eBay item From: <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 05 May 2002 12:22:24 -0500   Hi, everyone --   Came across this item while surfing eBay -- a souvenir coin from Old North =   Church in Boston (ca. 1894) "made from the pipes of the old organ". Hmmm.....?!!   Guess it goes to show that there have always been interesting schemes to raise money for organ projects...?? ;-)   <http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3D1350694034&r=3D0&t=3D= 0&showTutorial=3D0&ed=3D1021088796&indexURL=3D0&rd=3D1>   Happy Sunday afternoon to all!   Tim    
(back) Subject: Rogation Day and it's hot here! From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 5 May 2002 13:58:09 -0500   St. Agatha's Episcopal Church DeFuniak Springs, Florida   Easter 6 - Rogation Day   Prelude (all piano): Reverie - Claude Debussy Adagio sostenuto from Sonata quasi una Fantasia (Moonlight), Op. 27, no. 2 - Ludwig van Beethoven The Magic Garden - Maurice Ravel Processional Hymn - Alleluia, alleluia! Hearts and voices heavenward raise (Lux eoi) - H 191 Sequence Hymn - All creatures of our God and King (Lasst uns erfreuen) - H 400 Offertory Hymn - O Jesus, crowned with all renown (Kingsfold) - H 292 Music during Communion: This is my Father's world - piano arr. by Betty Jean Chatham Earth and all stars - David N. Johnson; H 412 Closing Hymn - All things bright and beautiful (Royal Oak) - H 405 Postlude - Allegretto from Op. 27, No. 2 - Beethoven   Was going to do the Clair de Lune, but just ran out of time to practice what with worrying over the ankle and knee. Summer has hit with a vengeance - of course, why should one expect spring in hell?   I did not realize what a chord I had struck with people until after I announced my resignation. The outpourings of stories from you all have confirmed that what I am going through is nothing new or unusual - what a sad commentary.   Yesterday in the mail I finally received formal acknowledgement from the reverend - a cold, formal letter. In it he made two backhanded swipes at me, but I have already this morning noticed that my feelings are already making an attempt to divorce myself from this place and the man. I pray hourly for the grace and humility to turn the other cheek and to shine forth the light of Christ.   The priest is going to continue the Series, but make it "more broadly based with local people serving on a board to advise as to artists and possibly venues . . . helpful if the community felt more involved in the program." However, it failed miserably when the community was involved - their involvement was in the form of dictating what to do, without any monetary or other support. I went outside the "community" to involve the immediate region, where people wanted to hear good classical music, helped pay for it, and attended religiously. A handful of Episcopalians in town are about to go to war against the Baptists, so I don't see any community upswelling of support. If I wasn't leaving money in the bank for the Series, it would die a natural death - now it will continue as an "amateur hour" until the money runs out.   Anyway, enough of my whining, and thanks to all of you for your prayers and support. I do know that the fervent prayers of a righteous man availeth much; just think what a group could do, particularly if there are women involved! Praise be to God that the doctor who examined me on Thursday stated that no bones were broken; the X-rays revealed some calcium deposits from a bad sprain when I was 17, but no new chips. I am not in a cast, and the prognosis is no permanent damage. I guess most workman's comp examinees are looking for a disability rating, but I just kept saying "good" to all his news. The examination was over an hour without interruption - can you believe a doctor would spend an hour with a patient? He twisted my arm into getting a cane and taught me how to use it, but it stays hanging on a chair. When I asked him if I could play the organ, he hesitated, then said, "Wait a minute - let's not get in a rush." I said, "Not today; I just want to know if I'm going to be prevented from pedalwork in the future?" And he said he saw no reason why I would not be as good as new in a few weeks.   Thursday afternoon I went to the church and attempted some pedals - no Mendelssohn No. 1 today, but I was able to get through the hymns and service music this morning without too many mistakes and substitutions, although not pain-free. My recovery so far has been nothing short of miraculous, but as you will note, most of my instrumental music today was piano. I wasn't sure whether the priest was going to give me communion this morning, but I limped on up there anyway and made him. He wouldn't come in the church beforehand, and hid in the parish house when I went in for water.   Please do not cease praying, that I will continue to recover, and that I will be able to walk humbly with my God in the times ahead (a skill that I have heretofore never developed).   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Re: Used Organ Music... From: "Bob and Jane Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net> Date: Sun, 5 May 2002 16:24:19 -0400   Your posting this was a great help!! Thank you........ Jane Hanudel       ----- Original Message ----- From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, May 04, 2002 6:25 AM Subject: Used Organ Music...     > > Greetings to all. > > Some colleagues like to buy used organ music in pretty good condition = when > such an opportunity presents itself... > > While surfing the web I came across a source of used organ music: > > Send an e-mail to Ms. Joy Mc Leod at dacapo@pacificcoast.net > > Needless to say I have no financial interest in the above... I'm just > trying to be helpful... > > She will send you attached files of her lists of > organ music she has for sale... There is a lot of good stuff on her > lists... > > Payment is by Paypal or international money order.... Don't be afraid of > Paypal... it is rather simple to pay by Paypal... as the famous saying > goes, "If I can do it, anyone can...." > > > > > Best wishes to all, > > > Morton W. Belcher, III > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Coming back into society at last From: "Alan Freed" <afreed3036@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 5 May 2002 14:36:51 -0700 (PDT)   Dear friends:   I've been in never-never land, e-mail wise, for some months. Now back in circulation. Please change my address in your address books from whatever you may have there to:   acfreed0904@earthlink.net   That is very similar to a previous address, so don't be confused by that.   I've been unintentionally OFF organchat for a long time, and would like to get back on there, but need an up-to-date "subscribe" address for Dennis. Help welcome from anyone. Likewise (though much less urgently) church-music-discuss.   Thank you all.   Alan Freed Saint Luke's Church Manhattan   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Health - your guide to health and wellness http://health.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Craig S. Williams: Cadet Chapel, West Point, NY May 12, 3 PM (x-post) From: <patmai@juno.com> Date: Sun, 5 May 2002 17:51:24 -0400   Hello, Pipechatters, on a simply gorgeous Hudson Valley afternoon in May.   If you do not have other plans to celebrate Mother's Day, you are cordially invited to West Point's Cadet Chapel to hear Craig Stewart Williams play at his home base, the Cadet Chapel IV/326. Pat Maimone, patmai@juno.com yp6867@usma.edu Post Chapel, West Point, III/57 Aeolian-Skinner/Moeller/Gress-Miles ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------- West Point Cadet Chapel May 12, 2002 Craig S. Williams "Hornpipe" from Water Music George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) Sonata in C Major, BWV 529 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Allegro; Largo; Allegro Pri=E8re, Opus 20 C=E9sar Franck (1822-1890) Final, Opus 27 No. 7 Marcel Dupr=E9 (1886-1971) Interval Trumpet Tune in B-flat Major Roy Brunner (b. 1945) Sonata in C Minor, Opus 65 No. 2 Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) Grave; Adagio; Allegro maestoso e vivace Fuga = =96 Allegro moderato "There Is a Fountain Filled with Blood" Setting by Jean Langlais (1907-1991) Fanfare Jacques Lemmens (1823-1881)   ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.  
(back) Subject: A Messiaen setback From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 5 May 2002 18:22:03 -0500   I reported a couple weeks ago that I actually found some Messiaen that I liked. This morning after readying myself for church I sat in the car so as to catch a few minutes of PipeDreams with Michael Barone. I had no inkling what the program's theme was for today. When I first cranked up the car, some music with big chords was playing, and I thought to myself, "That sounds like Messiaen in his twenties."   Now, mind you, I know virtually nothing about the man's music, but guess what - it WAS Messiaen music from his twenties. The theme of today's show was Messiaen music, so I settled back, extremely confident that in the next 20 minutes I would find another Messiaen piece that I liked.   Alas, it was not to be. In fact, the "Serene alleluias" chosen by Barone today did not resemble at all the same piece played by Le Prado. And I didn't get to stay to hear the "God with us" as interpreted by Jennifer Bate. As I got out of the car to return to church, I discovered that I can stand no more than about 15 minutes of Messiaen at a time. Similarly, I discovered several years ago at a recital that I could only take 20 minutes of solo harpsichord music at one sitting, even though I always thought I loved it. Maybe it's the particular performer.   I will still keep trying to enjoy Messiaen, but from now on need an hour or two's advance warning, so that I can ensure a flask of good bourbon is nearby, to assist that enjoyment or to dull the pain.   Sorry, Michael - I know you tried.   Glenda Sutton      
(back) Subject: Messiaen From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 05 May 2002 16:55:00 -0700   Here's the thing (I think) ... Messiaen is LITURGICAL organ music ... it has a GENERAL CONTEXT: the Latin celebration of the Roman Catholic Mass.   It also has a PARTICULAR context: the organ and acoustics of La Trinite, Paris.   Yes, yes, I know ... the composer played his own works on Germanic organs; there was an article in one of the journals analyzing how he went about it; and the organ at La Trinite is not as Cavaille-Coll left it.   But I think the GENERAL context should be looked at. Messiaen was a devout Roman Catholic in the rich mystical tradition of that Church. His musical "language" is both mystical and Roman Catholic. It doesn't (in my opinion) transfer well to the American concert hall.   Nor are "dry" acoustics in a concert hall OR church particularly kind to it. If there was anything disappointing about the premiere of The Mystery of the Holy Trinity at the National Shrine in Washington (aside from the unrevised Moller organ), it was that the full church made quite a dent in the reverberation time.   But there was something quite wonderful about listening to that music in that great shrine church, whatever one might think of the theology represented by the Pantokrator mosaic in the apse. The music was "at home."   I don't know quite how one addresses those difficulties ... the music is what it is; it was written for what it was written for.   Cheers,   Bud  
(back) Subject: Re: A Messiaen setback From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 05 May 2002 18:54:14 -0500   Glenda wrote: > > I reported a couple weeks ago that I actually found some Messiaen that I > liked.   A good piece to start with -- especially as it is fairly easy to play -- is Messiaen's "Le banquet celeste." A nice soft piece for the flutes and strings with a solo high up in the pedal. Not everyone likes even this, however. I remember a friend of mine playing it during the communion one Sunday many years ago, and after the service a sweet old lady (a retired music teacher) came up to him and asked what it was. On being told, she remarked, "Well, Walter, if that's what heaven is really like, I think I shall make other arrangements!"   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: A Messiaen setback From: "Bob Grube" <rkirkman@att.net> Date: Sun, 5 May 2002 19:56:48 -0400   I too am not a Messiaen lover, although I've attempted a few of his = pieces.   However, several months ago, I saw a BBC telecast of the Last Night of = the Proms from the Royal Albert Hall (probably several years old), in which Wayne Marshall played the "Transports of Joy". The organ was very much = out of tune. But Wayne Marshall's performance was riveting. And the audience Went Wild. It made me want to go out, buy the score and learn it. But, = in the end, I realized it was a matter of the right performer in the right venue. And that's the problem I have with Messiaen. It depends on the organ and the acoustic to "make it happen".   Bob Grube        
(back) Subject: Thank you to Michael Barone and Pipedreams From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Sun, 5 May 2002 20:40:42 EDT   Hi, Y'all!   I just wanted to write a public note of appreciation for Pipedreams and thanks to Michael Barone for many years of good listening.   A few weeks ago, we purchased a new computer and with the computer came speakers. It didn't take us very long to realize the stock speakers were junque and so we headed off to the computer store with a couple of c.d.'s = to audition speakers. We played an organ c.d. and an orchestral recording and =   one from my daughter's collection of music I rarely listen to and never perform! So . . . anyway, after writing a check with more zero's than I = had anticiapted, we headed home with our new speakers (including a big ol' = bass woofer), where upon watched our daughter install the new speakers in what seemed just a few seconds (I was still trying to sort out the directions written in Japanese, Korean, French, Spanish and Cyrillic).   From that day I've been hooked on the listening to all the Pipedreams programs in the archive section on their website. It's a wonderful, = wonderful treasury of recorded and verbal music history. Since neither of the two public radio stations down here airs the show, I now can listen via the = web. When I called in my pledge a few weeks ago to one of the stations, I was asked my favorite radio program. Of course, I am answer Pipedreams.   Thanks, Michael, I am in your debt.   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea  
(back) Subject: Fisk Opus 119 - Gainesville FL From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 5 May 2002 20:52:38 EDT     --part1_9.279c965b.2a072dd6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   This morning at the 11 am service, Fisk Op. 119, accompanied Vierne's = "Solemn Mass" as part of the 18th Annual Festival of Liturgy and the Arts. = Although still unfinished the organ supplied ample accompaniment and color for the approximately 50 voice choir. This year's festival is part of = celebration activites at the completion of a 5.5 million dollar renovation program for =   First Presbyterian Church, Gainesville. Most obvious is the renovation of =   the sanctuary and nave with acoustical and visual improvements throughout, =   resulting in an extremely live acoustical environment.   In a beautiful dark case the organ sits high in the room behind the = four-tier elevated choir loft. Pipes of the Great and Pedal principals for the facade. The attached console sits on the top tier of the choir loft. = The action is mechanical with servo-assist and electric stop action. Swell reeds, one Positiv reed, on Great reed, and two of the Pedal reeds are to = be installed by July. The only reeds used today were the French Trumpet on =   the Great (German Trumpet to be installed) and the 8 pedal reed.   The show piece of the organ for me is the 8 Principal on the Great. With =   high lead content, it has a warm, rich, and slight horn quality to it. = It is broad and give the impression of great power, but is not out of balance =   with the rest of the organ, not can it be considered "loud." The = organ, at least at this point, cannot be considered a loud instrument, although = it does a fine job of filling the room.   With voicing styles of several major periods represented, and with the addition of the unique Fisk temperament, the organ manages to establish a very unique and cohesive sound, but it is by no means homogenous. Everything works together and choruses contrast with each while still blending and enhancing each other. Each division also has a distince character, the most distinctive contrasts being between the Great (with = its high-lead content Montre) and the Positiv (with its high tin-content = chorus). The Great and Positive are double decked in the front of the case = which sits on the top tier of the choir loft, with the Swell double decked = behind and sits on the floor of what used to be the organ chamber. The front = wall of the chamber space has been removed essentially leaving a shelf. Pedal =   ranks on on each side.   The flutes are very colourful, broad and bright. They are full enough = that one of the hymns today was successfully accompanied on flutes 8 and 4.   The French Trumpet on the Great is very colourful, but is smooth an = velvety, having brightness without the customary rattle and blat which has been my experience with more common "copies" of French reeds.   The Swell strings are very rich in harmonics and, although I'm told they = are less keen than some other recent Fisk strings, are very romantic, working very succesfully as a celeste but still blending and pleasant when used = alone or with the flutes.   This organ achieves the goals of the American Classic ideal, but without losing character. This is indeed a very fine instrument. At this point = I can only imagine what it will be like when completed!   There have been some recent discussions regarding console layout so I = went up to take a look. The keydesk is layed out the with Great as the bottom =   keyboard, Positiv next, and Swell on top. The stops are in four rows on each side of the keyboards. To the right of the Great on the bottom row = are the Great flutes, string, and reeds in traditional order (8 8 8 4 8 8), = the second row is the Great Principal chorus. The third row is the = Positive Principal chorus and reeds, with the flute chorus on the fourth row. = Stops are engraved in black and couplers (which are placed closest to the = keyboards in the respective rows) in red. To the left of the keyboards on the = first level are the flutes of the Pedal, with the Principals and reeds on the second row. The third row is the flutes and principals of the Swell, = with the strings and reeds on the top row. Stops are arranged in pitch and family order from left to right on both sides.   I guess for the techies I'll mention that there is a little closed circuit = TV monitor imbedded in the music rack so that the organist can watch the director. Mark Coffey is the Organist and Music Director, and Miriam = Zach is Chancel Choir accompanist.   We will be treated to an excellent series of inaugural concerts on Fisk = Op. 119: Sunday, 29 September, 4 pm -- David Craighead Monday, 30 September 7:30pm -- David Craighead Sunday, 20 October, 5 pm -- J. Melvin Butler Sunday, 3 November, 4 pm -- Mark Coffey Sunday, 30 March, 4 pm -- David Higgs   In the mean time, the concert series at First Presbyterian continues with various instrumental and vocal performers and using the 1/9 A David Moore organ in the Iona Chapel.   And, programs of this magnitude and quality cannot function without staff = as well as community suppert. A great deal of credit and appreciation must = go to Dr. Robert Battles, Jr., senior pastor First Presbyterian Church. = This morning he preached a wonderful homily using the text of the Vierne Mass = as basis.     Bruce in the Muttestery of St. Dogmael with the Baskerbeagles http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 "Snuffer--The Lighthouse Beagle" is now in print (she even visits a pipe =   organ!!) Please visit: <A = HREF=3D"http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053">http://www.visionsuccess.com/B= C2053</A>   --part1_9.279c965b.2a072dd6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">This morning at the 11 am service, Fisk Op. 119, = accompanied Vierne's "Solemn Mass" as part of the 18th Annual Festival of = Liturgy and the Arts.&nbsp; Although still unfinished the organ supplied = ample accompaniment and color for the approximately 50 voice = choir.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; This year's festival is part of celebration = activites at the completion of a 5.5 million dollar renovation program for = First Presbyterian Church, Gainesville.&nbsp; Most obvious is the = renovation of the sanctuary and nave with acoustical and visual = improvements throughout, resulting in an extremely live acoustical = environment.<BR> <BR> In a beautiful dark case the organ sits high in the room behind the = four-tier elevated choir loft.&nbsp;&nbsp; Pipes of the Great and Pedal = principals for the facade.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The attached console sits on = the top tier of the choir loft.&nbsp;&nbsp; The action is mechanical with = servo-assist and electric stop action.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Swell reeds, one = Positiv reed, on Great reed, and two of the Pedal reeds are to be = installed by July.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The only reeds used today were the = French Trumpet on the Great (German Trumpet to be installed) and the 8 = pedal reed.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> The show piece of the organ for me is the 8 Principal on the = Great.&nbsp;&nbsp; With high lead content, it has a warm, rich, and slight = horn quality to it.&nbsp;&nbsp; It is broad and give the impression of = great power, but is not out of balance with the rest of the organ, not can = it be considered "loud."&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The organ, at least at = this point, cannot be considered a loud instrument, although it does a = fine job of filling the room.&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR> With voicing styles of several major periods represented, and with the = addition of the unique Fisk temperament, the organ manages to establish a = very unique and cohesive sound, but it is by no means = homogenous.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Everything works together and choruses = contrast with each while still blending and enhancing each = other.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Each division also has a distince character, the = most distinctive contrasts being between the Great (with its high-lead = content Montre) and the Positiv (with its high tin-content chorus).&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The Great and Positive are double = decked in the front of the case which sits on the top tier of the choir = loft, with the Swell double decked behind and sits on the floor of what = used to be the organ chamber.&nbsp;&nbsp; The front wall of the chamber = space has been removed essentially leaving a shelf.&nbsp;&nbsp; Pedal = ranks on on each side.<BR> <BR> The flutes are very colourful, broad and bright.&nbsp;&nbsp; They are full = enough that one of the hymns today was successfully accompanied on flutes = 8 and 4.&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR> The French Trumpet on the Great is very colourful, but is smooth an = velvety, having brightness without the customary rattle and blat which has = been my experience with more common "copies" of French reeds. <BR> <BR> The Swell strings are very rich in harmonics and, although I'm told they = are less keen than some other recent Fisk strings, are very romantic, = working very succesfully as a celeste but still blending and pleasant when = used alone or with the flutes.<BR> <BR> This organ achieves the goals of the American Classic ideal, but without = losing character.&nbsp;&nbsp; This is indeed a very fine = instrument.&nbsp;&nbsp; At this point I can only imagine what it will be = like when completed!<BR> <BR> There have&nbsp; been some recent discussions regarding console layout so = I went up to take a look.&nbsp;&nbsp; The keydesk is layed out the with = Great as the bottom keyboard, Positiv next, and Swell on top.&nbsp;&nbsp; = The stops are in four rows on each side of the keyboards.&nbsp;&nbsp; To = the right of the Great on the bottom row are the Great flutes, = string,&nbsp; and reeds in traditional order (8 8 8 4 8 8), the second row = is the Great&nbsp; Principal chorus.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The third row is = the Positive Principal chorus and reeds, with the flute chorus on the = fourth row.&nbsp;&nbsp; Stops are engraved in black and couplers (which = are placed closest to the keyboards in the respective rows) in = red.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; To the left of the keyboards on the first level are = the flutes of the Pedal, with the Principals and reeds on the second = row.&nbsp;&nbsp; The third row is the flutes and principals of the Swell, = with the strings and reeds on the top row.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Stops are arr <BR> I guess for the techies I'll mention that there is a little closed circuit = TV monitor imbedded in the music rack so that the organist can watch the = director.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Mark Coffey is the Organist and Music = Director, and Miriam Zach is Chancel Choir accompanist.<BR> <BR> We will be treated to an excellent series of inaugural concerts on Fisk = Op. 119:<BR> Sunday, 29 September, 4 pm&nbsp; --&nbsp; David Craighead<BR> Monday, 30 September 7:30pm -- David Craighead<BR> Sunday, 20 October,&nbsp; 5 pm&nbsp; --&nbsp; J. Melvin Butler <BR> Sunday, 3 November, 4 pm --&nbsp; Mark Coffey <BR> Sunday, 30 March, 4 pm --&nbsp; David Higgs<BR> <BR> In the mean time, the concert series at First Presbyterian continues with = various instrumental and vocal performers and using the 1/9 A David Moore = organ in the Iona Chapel.&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR> And, programs of this magnitude and quality cannot function without staff = as well as community suppert.&nbsp;&nbsp; A great deal of credit and = appreciation must go to Dr. Robert Battles, Jr., senior pastor First = Presbyterian Church.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; This morning he preached a = wonderful homily using the text of the Vierne Mass as basis.<BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery of St. Dogmael<BR> with the Baskerbeagles&nbsp; http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> "Snuffer--The Lighthouse Beagle"&nbsp; is now in print&nbsp; (she even = visits a pipe organ!!)<BR> Please visit:&nbsp; </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000ff" = style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D1 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><A = HREF=3D"http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053">http://www.visionsuccess.com/B= C2053</A></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: = #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> = </FONT></HTML>   --part1_9.279c965b.2a072dd6_boundary--