PipeChat Digest #2839 - Monday, May 6, 2002
 
Andrew Henderson, DMA Recital, 4/19/02 - St. Ignatius
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: A Messiaen setback
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RE: Used Organ Music...
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: messiaen
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: New pipe organ in Waco, Texas
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Used Organ Music...
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
used music (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: New pipe organ in Waco, Texas
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
RE: used music (X-posted)
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Fwd: T Murray Organ recital Utica, NY
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
 

(back) Subject: Andrew Henderson, DMA Recital, 4/19/02 - St. Ignatius From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 10:13:22 -0400   Dear Lists and Friends,   ANDREW HENDERSON, Assistant Organist at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, NY A recital played "as partial fulfillment for the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree" at The Juilliard School of Music, where he holds the C. V. Starr Foundation Doctoral Fellowship, studying with Dr. John Weaver.   The recital was played at St. Ignatius Loyola, Friday, April 19th, 2002 at 8 p.m. It was officially a Juilliard School function, rather than a part of the church's well-attended series. Therefore, the audience was small but of high quality(!), including, of course, Andrew's teacher, Dr. John Weaver. This small number, coupled with the high humidity, did amazing things to the acoustic. It is always very good, but now it had an even greater amount of resonance than usual.   Bach - Toccata, Adagio & Fugue in C In less than the most musically mature hands (and feet), this Toccata can become more exercise, less music. Today, it was in good hands and feet, and the long Pedal solo was glorious, and I don't mean technically, although it was that as well. Adagio - lovely registration, from one who knows the instrument well, played with lots of forward movement, not in dirge mode. The Grave, a wonderful bridge based on a 16' with lovely ornamentation. A gentle but vital pace in the Fugue, a wonderfully relentless dance.   Reger - Fantasy on <Wie schoen leucht' uns der Morgenstern>. It was so good to hear that great crashing opening on this large instrument in its acoustic! Andrew's playing was so incredibly rhapsodic, both in big stuff and the gorgeous gentle stuff w/cantus. What an edifice he built! The blaze of all of it at the end was incredible.   Calvin Hampton - Five Dances. These works are in no danger of fading, I don't think, but I always feel some joy when they are publically played, so they are available for more sets of ears to come to know them! Andrew really made them work (and they made him work!) in a Juilliard student recital, about which I wrote a while back. It was excellent in the very dry acoustic of Tully Hall, and here today, he tailored the performance for this beautifully reverberant space, and it surely did dance and swagger!   Durufle Prelude & Fugue on the Name ALAIN For me, this is a sort of Double Desert Island piece. Of course, I must have this great work of Durufle on the Island, but it most tenderly quotes significantly from another work I must have with me, the Litanies of Alain himself. This was meticulously and imaginatively registered. Wonderful balances - One of my special favorite works, suffused w/the spirit of Durufle but with those Litanies references. How could one resist?   Andrew Henderson is one of 18 organists accepted for the North American Semi-Final Round of the Calgary Competition, which begins this week in Atlanta. Four of the 18 will be chosen to go on to the finals in Calgary. I will hope to get out a full report of the musical proceedings of the competition as quickly as possible.   You may have seen the ad in last month's TAO announcing the arrival of a new Mander Organ at Peachtree UMC Church in Atlanta. That meant arriving in thousands of pieces, of course, and there is now a crew from London putting the great puzzle back together. In addition to hearing six three-hour concerts of great organ playing, I will have some time at Peachtree to shout encouragement.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com        
(back) Subject: Re: A Messiaen setback From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 10:53:15 EDT   Messiaen didn't enjoy a luxurious, liquid acoustic, even though his music calls for it.  
(back) Subject: RE: Used Organ Music... From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 12:04:34 -0400   Morton Belcher wrote:   >While surfing the web I came across a source of used organ music:   >Send an e-mail to Ms. Joy Mc Leod at dacapo@pacificcoast.net   Is this a continuing source, i.e. a dealer, or is disposing of a single personal collection? (I suppose I could write, as you advise, and ask her myself, but would rather not bother her with a casual inquiry since I'm = not actively in the market, having more music already than I could ever play = the rest of my life).   This subject brings up in general the question of what should be done with one's collection of organ music when one has become too old and decrepit = to make use of it anymore. A year or two ago, a prominent member of our profession wondered to me what would eventually become of hers. What I suggested was some combination of the following two altruistic steps:   (1) One's own alma mater, if it still exists and has an active organ department and music library-- or failing that, the music library of some other conservatory or university school of music, for the most unusual items;   (2) Give the remainder of the collection to a young professional-- if not = a personal friend or student, then the brightest and most dedicated young person you can find-- who, being such, will best appreciate the = significance of such a gift and benefit from it. Especially if you have cataloged or indexed it to a significant extent, it gains in value by being kept together. Specifically, I recommended that she should speak to someone in the AGO who is in charge of the chapter, regional, or even national = contest, about offering a substantial part of her library as part of the prize for the winner. If you are a famous teacher and recitalist yourself, anyone = just starting out in their career should jump at the opportunity to inherit = your library, and if the national contest administrators of the AGO have any sense, they should likewise jump at the offer. The Reinken file of us may have to content ourselves with a local or regional prizewinner (although I suppose it doesn't hurt to ask higher, since I have never heard of this actually being done), but aside from expert markings and annotations, provenance is a secondary consideration to the scores themselves.   Unfortunately, one cannot generally hope for a large monetary appraisal = (if made honestly). As a fellow music librarian tells prospective donors who speak glowingly (as they often do) of the "valuable", even "priceless" = stack of music they have found in dear old Aunt Olga's attic-- if used music actually had much market value, then we would find the country dotted with used-music shops. But we don't. Nowadays, we probably have more shops devoted to selling used baseball cards! E-bay and other possible ways to match sellers with buyers via the Internet might permit of higher selling prices than otherwise, but unless my dotage becomes a desperately indigent one, I think I'd still prefer the altruistic route for my two filing cabinets full.   What about you?   Paul    
(back) Subject: RE: messiaen From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 17:17:06 +0100   Hello,   Messaien is one composer I find difficult (not to mention demanding), = but I always feel that, in spite of my "problem" with his music, I = always sense that it is outstanding, whatever it is that Messaien was = trying to say! Domitila makes the valid point that music cannot be = restricted to a particular place at a particular time and using a = particular instrument. I have certainly heard Messaien played here in = the UK which made the hair stand on end.=20   It is interesting to attempt improvisation in the "style" of such as = Messaien, Tournemire or Langlais.=20 Tournemire I find fascinating. His music doesn't always "work", and yet, = the rich store of ideas inspired a whole generation and must have caused = many nightmares for Maurice Durufle as he struggled to write down = recorded improvisations by Tournemire.   As a composer, Messaien is not for me! I leave it to others who may = fully understand the music in such a way as I am incapable. The Asian = rhythms may be fascinating, as well as the recurring "motifs", but I = personally feel that much that Messaien wrote may have been a little = "contrived". Then I remind myself that some organists have gone to = extraordinary lengths in the mastering of Messaien's music; especially = someone such as Dame Gilian Weir.=20   However, my "instinct" guides me firmly towards Tournemire,Dupre and = Durufle as THE French Composers.=20   However, I do not find the idea of French "mysticsm" a compelling one, = any more than I find the "mysticism" of Holst's "Planet Suite" a = particularly appropriate description.   Mystics, by definition, are incomprehensible, but the incomprehensible = cannot be defined as mystical without qualification.....it may just be = plum crazy!   I have an idea in fact! I shall, from this day on, wear a black cape at = all times with an attractive red-lining. I shall seat myself at the = organ and play, at all times, with my eyes closed and my head thrown = back. I will play huge "mystical" (ie: incomprehensible) chords whilst, = at the same time, permitting snatches of recognisable plainsong to = overwhelm the devout. I shall shun any personal contact and write to my = friends requesting that they never contact me, and within a couple of = years I can guarantee that I will have many students, a trinity of = disciples and a few wise sages who, quite rightly, would simply say, = "That bloke is as mad as a Hatter!"   Am I being frivolous or unfair? =20   That's my problem.....I do not know the answer. I find much in the = French repertoire which simply "poses" as great music. Nevertheless, in = its wild spontaneous "madness", there is much which can move the = listener and thrill to the core. However, I refrain from tagging much of = that music as "mystical" or even "great".   In the music of Bach I find the greatest mysticism of all. I look for = "form" and find myself uplifted by melody. I look for "melody" and find = myself immersed in contrapuntal ingenuity. I search for "entries" and = hear them not, until I look at the page and find them going backwards or = upside down. I wonder at the spontaneous dash of a Bach Toccata, only to = find that it is also mathematically perfect. I search for "the Power and = the Glory" in the St.Matthew Passion, only to find myself choked by the = gentle pathos of the quieter sections.   Every time I hear Bach, I learn something new or hear something = different. Even badly played Bach somehow seems to transcend the = performer.   My point is simple.....composers (even improvisers) have certain "tricks = of the trade" up their sleeves, and in French impressionism, there is = more illusion than content in many instances.=20   I hope I am not pouring cold water on French impressionism, but that is = exactly what it is.....an "impression"..........perhaps a brief moment = in time, the transitory feeling or the fleeting glimpse. It is exactly = what the medieval builders and religious leaders achieved with the great = cathedrals.....the sensory-confusion caused by incomplete vistas, = "mysterious" echoes, strange lights, grotesque carvings, complex ritual = and, above all, the etherial quality of plainsong.The whole package = imples the "mystical presence". It is, in real terms, pure theatre , = not even matched by the "gravity" of the court-room or the silence of = the library......we are all victims of the lie.   REAL mysticim or merely incomprehensible? Well, perhaps the "Big Bang" (nil circumference and infinite mass), or = maybe MANY Big Bangs over time which, by mathematical definition cannot = exist. Perhaps a Universe which, after expanding, contracts and starts = again.....no beginning and no end....a steady state in fact, interrupted = by big events.   Perhaps, "Love thine enemy?" (Post Sept.11th?)   This is the greatest mystery of all, and the greatest mysteries deserve = only a single response.....silent contemplation of the incomprehensible.   I'll shut up now and work on my cape.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Domitila Ballesteros wrote:-     Sorry, my english is poor. But I'd like to say to tell some words about this. Charles Rosen, in The Romantic Generation says (sorry again, because my book is in portuguese, and I'm trying to translate to english...........   Well, he speaks about the Chopin's studies. He says: "It is not the purpose for which the work was written that determines his style, (...) what requests attention is less the composer's immediate purpose than the tradition in the which and on which he is acting.  
(back) Subject: Re: New pipe organ in Waco, Texas From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 12:37:36 EDT   afreed3036@yahoo.com inquires:     >Don't take this as a big "challenge" or something, but >what kind of a "firm" "conduct[s] a funeral at the >church"? <<   The firm is Wilkirson-Hatch-Bailey Funeral Directors. The deceased was a member of the church and the family elected to have the service at the = church rather than in one of our two chapels. The deceased was a 33 year = employee of W-H-B where I am employed part-time (read=3Dretired!).   >And (gee, I hope this isn't a habit), why would a >20-rank organ have three manuals? <<   I am assuming that this is what the customer wanted, after all, its their money. It may also be due to planned expansion of the organ at some later =   date. Neither Range Organ or St. Mark's Lutheran commented on this = matter. How the specifications will be configured is an unknown to me at this = time.   The delay in responding to your questions is due to my being absent from = my computer since last Friday.   Best wishes, Jim Pitts  
(back) Subject: Re: Used Organ Music... From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Mon, 06 May 2002 13:56:35 -0400   This is a VERY germane issue to me!! I do have an informal document regarding the disposition of my own library, both books and music, among = my two daughters (both professional string players, one also a college music prof) and an "adopted son" who is a professional organist and choirmaster. My music library consists chiefly of piano and (chiefly) organ music, several hundred study scores of orchestra works (some with chorus), single copies of hundreds of large choral works, and literally thousands of = choral octavos in single copies, many now surely out of print. Books include what I did not give away when I retired from university teaching, still in the hundreds of books, and a hymnal collection of perhaps 500 - 700 = hymnals.   I've offered those three "first refusal," after which this informal document offers the hymnal collection to a theological seminary library, = the books to the musicology dept at Eastman, to set out in the hallway some = day as a book give-away, and the organ music in similar fashion.   The Lancaster chapter, AGO, has a once-a-year music give-away, most = of it organ music and choral works, either in single copies of sometimes sets of a given work in multiple copies being removed from a given choral library. Quite some years ago, some jerk who did not understand the value of Harry Rowe Shelley's "the King of Love My Shepehrd Is," gave aweay his choral library's file of that title, and I grabbed it for my own. (The history of changing taste is fun history, and it's likely that in 20 years someone at that church will spend big bucks to purchase a set of that anthem, it then becoming again a longed-for item to sing!! The jerk who gave it away should have been fired!!!)   I cherish copies of Guilmant sonatas 4 & 5 from the library of a now-deceased organist in Lancaster, both as reference to his fingerings et al and as a historical document. I may contribute those copies to the archives of the church where he played, now that they realize "who he = was."   Finally: Warren and Nancy Apple in Venice FL seem to have a small "business" in used music. I assume that they purchase libraries of music and even textbooks en masse and then sell them item by item via a list = they send out every so often. I've bought any number of items from them. Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA     > From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 12:04:34 -0400 > To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: RE: Used Organ Music... > > Morton Belcher wrote: > >> While surfing the web I came across a source of used organ music: > >> Send an e-mail to Ms. Joy Mc Leod at dacapo@pacificcoast.net > > Is this a continuing source, i.e. a dealer, or is disposing of a single > personal collection? (I suppose I could write, as you advise, and ask = her > myself, but would rather not bother her with a casual inquiry since I'm = not > actively in the market, having more music already than I could ever play = the > rest of my life). > > This subject brings up in general the question of what should be done = with > one's collection of organ music when one has become too old and decrepit = to > make use of it anymore. A year or two ago, a prominent member of our > profession wondered to me what would eventually become of hers. What I > suggested was some combination of the following two altruistic steps: > > (1) One's own alma mater, if it still exists and has an active organ > department and music library-- or failing that, the music library of = some > other conservatory or university school of music, for the most unusual > items; > > (2) Give the remainder of the collection to a young professional-- if = not a > personal friend or student, then the brightest and most dedicated young > person you can find-- who, being such, will best appreciate the = significance > of such a gift and benefit from it. Especially if you have cataloged or > indexed it to a significant extent, it gains in value by being kept > together. Specifically, I recommended that she should speak to someone = in > the AGO who is in charge of the chapter, regional, or even national = contest, > about offering a substantial part of her library as part of the prize = for > the winner. If you are a famous teacher and recitalist yourself, anyone = just > starting out in their career should jump at the opportunity to inherit = your > library, and if the national contest administrators of the AGO have any > sense, they should likewise jump at the offer. The Reinken file of us = may > have to content ourselves with a local or regional prizewinner (although = I > suppose it doesn't hurt to ask higher, since I have never heard of this > actually being done), but aside from expert markings and annotations, > provenance is a secondary consideration to the scores themselves. > > Unfortunately, one cannot generally hope for a large monetary appraisal = (if > made honestly). As a fellow music librarian tells prospective donors = who > speak glowingly (as they often do) of the "valuable", even "priceless" = stack > of music they have found in dear old Aunt Olga's attic-- if used music > actually had much market value, then we would find the country dotted = with > used-music shops. But we don't. Nowadays, we probably have more shops > devoted to selling used baseball cards! E-bay and other possible ways = to > match sellers with buyers via the Internet might permit of higher = selling > prices than otherwise, but unless my dotage becomes a desperately = indigent > one, I think I'd still prefer the altruistic route for my two filing > cabinets full. > > What about you? > > Paul > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: used music (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 06 May 2002 11:35:27 -0700   DON'T THROW AWAY THOSE OCTAVOS! (grin)   We are hoping to start an online repository of specifically ANGLICAN music, both anthems and liturgical music, similar to the Choral Public Domain Library ... we felt that the liturgical music (at least) is a specific enough sub-set that we didn't want to take up bandwidth on CPDL, as a LOT of it would be for archival purposes only ... Victorian Communion Services, settings of the Magnificat, Nunc dimittis ... since the Prayer Book they were written for is no longer in use in most places (in the U.S., at least).   There is a large library of hard copies at St. Matthew's ... several thousand anthems and services ... and I have made arrangements for single copies of those to go to the person who is organizing this (as well as my own personal library of single copies when I retire).   Octavos are the hardest for a library to deal with ... they usually don't have the staff or the budget to bind and catalog them ... and SO MUCH has been lost already.   ANY anthem with a Scriptural or liturgical text is fair game for an Anglican repository. If you DO have such, PLEASE contact me ... I'll take them, and/or I'll put you in touch with the person who's organizing the repository.   Cheers,   Bud  
(back) Subject: Re: New pipe organ in Waco, Texas From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 11:39:58 -0700 (PDT)   afreed3036@yahoo.com inquires:   >And (gee, I hope this isn't a habit), why would a >20-rank organ have three manuals? <<   Occasionally, organ builders have to build things they don't want to. One well known mid-west company built two organs I am familiar with -- one was a 5-manual with 15 ranks, and the other was a 3-manual with three ranks.   I'm not saying that this is right, but the people working in these factories have to feed themselves and their families, and when "experts" insist on something outrageous, occasionally they have to give in and do what the customer wants. If they don't get their paychecks, they will be out the door faster than you can say "electronic organ". (The company I'm referring to will build you a 15 manual organ with 20 ranks of pipes with hot and cold running water and a built in john if you want one.)   I don't know anything about the new organ in Waco, but before we start throwing rocks, let's find out exactly what we're talking about.   D. Keith Morgan           =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the = stones.   Psalm 137:9   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Health - your guide to health and wellness http://health.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: used music (X-posted) From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 17:04:11 -0400   Dear Bud:   Wonderful!   >We are hoping to start an online repository of specifically ANGLICAN music, both anthems and liturgical music, similar to the Choral Public Domain Library ... we felt that the liturgical music (at least) is a specific enough sub-set   When I was in England in the summer of 1974, I went to Bournemouth especially to visit a large used music shop called Kenneth Mummery's. Mr. Mummery himself was my gracious host there on a Saturday afternoon. His = wife is Betty Matthews, a scholar about the organ, among whose writings is a series of pamphlets entitled "The organs and organists of ___ cathedral". Mr. Mummery himself was, particularly knowledgeable and enthusiastic about organ and church music.   There I bought about a dozen hard-bound volumes of late Victorian Novello octavos, apparently issued by Novello themselves. The music is mostly = junk, but these volumes are nice to have around, anyway, and would be very appropriate in an authoritative source such as this repository.   More interesting still are three thick volumes of similar physical = vintage, but repertoire from various eras and publishers, assembled for his = personal reference by a Victorian scholar of tractarianism and cathedral music, librarian at S. Michael's, Tenbury, and (I think) vicar choral at S. = Paul's, John Bumpus. This stuff is of considerably higher musical quality. The latest Groves Dictionary mentions the library that he built up for himself and was "broken up after his death." Seems I have a small part of that.   I don't think I can stand to part with them yet, but when the time comes, = I will definitely consider this repository. However, on second thought, I should take a look at them, and if they are deteriorating should find a better home for them immediately. No sense keeping them in my grubby = little hands if they would enjoy a longer life elsewhere. What climate control conditions and other specialized handling is proposed for this valuable archival material?   Paul    
(back) Subject: Fwd: T Murray Organ recital Utica, NY From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 17:22:22 -0500   The following was posted to the EORG-L list and since I haven't seen it posted over on any of the other lists i decided to forward it. Hopefully maybe someone in that area will hear about the recital from this and will attend.   David ***************************************************************** >From: "hillyer" <hillyer@adelphia.net> >To: <EORG-L@pipechat.org> >Subject: T Murray Organ recital Utica, NY >Date: Mon, 6 May 2002 17:56:41 -0400 >X-Priority: 3 >Reply-To: "Electronic Organ Discussion List" <EORG-L@pipechat.org> >Sender: <EORG-L@pipechat.org> >List-Subscribe: <mailto:EORG-L-on@pipechat.org> >List-Digest: <mailto:EORG-L-digest@pipechat.org> >List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:EORG-L-off@pipechat.org> > >What: Organ Recital >Where: Grace Episcopal Church > 6 Elizabeth Street > Utica, NY 13501 >When: Friday, May 17th 7:30PM >Who: THOMAS MURRAY >Cost: Free Free Free >phone (315) 733-7575 > >Program: > >Prelude and Fugue in E-flat J.S. Bach > (BWV 552 - "St. Anne") > >from Six Trios, opus 47 (1900) Max Reger > Cannon > Siciliano > Scherzo > Gigue > >Two Preludes on Spirituals Robert Greenlee > Where you there? > Ride on, King Jesus > >Peer Gynt Suite # 1 Edvard Grieg > transcribed by Edwin H. Lemare > Morning > Ase's Death > Anitra's Dance > In the Hall of the Mountain-King > > Intermission > >Mouvement Jean Berveiller > >Two Preludes founded on Welsh Folk Songs > Ralph Vaughan Williams > Romanza ("The White Rock") > Toccata ("St. David's Day") > >Chant de Mai, opus 53, no. 1 Joseph Jongen >Sonata Eroica, opus 94 Joseph Jongen > >The organ at Grace Episcopal Church > >1983 Holtkamp organ >68 stops, 67 ranks, 3553 pipes > >SWELL ORGAN (61 notes) > 16' Bass Bourdon > 8' Geigen > 8' Voix Celeste > 8' Bourdon > 4' Principal > 4' Harmonic Flute > 2' Doublette >1 1/3' Larigot > 4R Plein Jeu 1' > l6' Fagott > 8' Trompette > 8' Oboe > 4' Clairon > Tremolo > >GREAT ORGAN (61 notes) > 16' Principal Bass > 8' Principal > 8' Gemshorn > 8' Solo Flute > 8 Rohrgedackt > 4' Octave > 4' Spizflote > 2' Superoctave > 2R Sesquialtera > 4R Mixture 2' > 3R Sharf 1/2' > 8' Trumpet > 4' Klarine > 16' Bombarde > 8' Bombarde > 4' Bombarde > 16' Fanfara > 8' Fanfara > 4' Fanfara > >CHOIR ORGAN (61 notes) > 8' Flauto Dolce > 8' Flute Celeste > 8' Copula > 4' Praestant > 4' Rohrflote >2 2/3' Nazard > 2' Octave > 2' Blockflote >1 3/5' Tierce > 1' Flute > 3R Fourniture 2/3' > 16' Schalmey > 8' Clarinet > Tremolo > 16' Bombarde > 8' Bombarde > 4' Bombarde > 16' Fanfara > 8' Fanfara > 4' Fanfara > >PEDAL ORGAN (32 notes) > 32' Subbass > 16' Principal > 16' Subbass > 16' Flute > 8' Octave > 8' Bass Flute > 4' Choralbass > 4' Open Flute > 4R Rauschwerk 2 2/3' > 32' Basun > 16' Posaune > 16' Schalmey > 8' Trumpet > 8' Schalmey > 4' Schalmey > 16' Bombarde > 8' Bombarde > >To get here take NYS Thruway to exit 31, Utica. Take Genesee Street = (South) >to Elizabeth St. On street parking around the church, parking in our = small >lot behind the church, possibly in the next lot behind our parking lot = and >across Elizabeth St behind the Adirondack Bank building. Paid parking >available next to the Radisson Hotel across the street. For map click = here: > >http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=3DUS&address=3D6+Elizabeth+St= &city=3D >u&state=3DNY&zipcode=3D13501&homesubmit.x=3D46&homesubmit.y=3D8 > >Hope to see you there. >Thank you. >Carl Hillyer > > > >EORG-L: A discussion List for electronic organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.gulfcst.com/eorg-l >List: mailto:eorg-l@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:EORG-LAdmin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org