PipeChat Digest #2852 - Monday, May 13, 2002
 
Re: Easter Greetings:
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
list
  by "joanne rickards" <jovorick@earthlink.net>
Re: Defining Moments (X-post)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Fwd: [Church-Music] Wedding policy
  by "Rev. Ed" <edwardorgan@hotmail.com>
Re: Defining Moments (X-post)
  by "David Carter" <david_n_carter@hotmail.com>
Re: Defining Moments (X-post)
  by "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk>
Atlanta Competition
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
NYC Baroque Brass EnsembleThis Tuesday
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Defining Moments (X-post)
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Defining Moments
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
Re: Defining Moments
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: ALL READ!!!! IMPORTANT - VIRUS WARNING
  by "Scott Davis" <stalan@ix.netcom.com>
Re: ALL READ!!!! IMPORTANT - VIRUS WARNING
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Easter Greetings: From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 08:03:54 EDT     --part1_1a6.230b006.2a1105aa_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/31/2002 1:35:56 AM Eastern Standard Time, mjolnir@ticnet.com writes:     > The noted English Organist, W[illiam] T. Best, Municipal organist at St. > Georges Hall, Liverpool, was a composer; among his compositions was one > for Organ, and perhaps Brass, entitled "March for a Church Festival". I > have re-typeset this work, in anticipation or republication, and > considered attaching a ~.MIDI file to this message, since (though I've > identified no specifically Easter themes) Easter is certainly a Church > festival. > > However, since the MIDI file is a bit on the large size (about 25K), > I've decided instead to offer it in a slightly different mode: any > interested in this, can reply _privately_ to this message, and I'll > forward the file to you off list.   ns:   I'd love a Midi file or a Finale copy, or whatever you're offering!     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA   --part1_1a6.230b006.2a1105aa_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 3/31/2002 1:35:56 AM Eastern Standard Time, mjolnir@ticnet.com writes:<BR> <BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The noted English = Organist, W[illiam] T. Best, Municipal organist at St.<BR> Georges Hall, Liverpool, was a composer; among his compositions was = one<BR> for Organ, and perhaps Brass, entitled "March for a Church = Festival".&nbsp; I<BR> have re-typeset this work, in anticipation or republication, and<BR> considered attaching a ~.MIDI file to this message, since (though I've<BR> identified no specifically Easter themes) Easter is certainly a Church<BR> festival.<BR> <BR> However, since the MIDI file is a bit on the large size (about 25K),<BR> I've decided instead to offer it in a slightly different mode:&nbsp; = any<BR> interested in this, can reply _privately_ to this message, and I'll<BR> forward the file to you off list.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> ns:<BR> <BR> I'd love a Midi file or a Finale copy, or whatever you're offering!<BR> <BR> <BR> Steven Skinner<BR> Minister of Music<BR> First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant<BR> Erie, PA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1a6.230b006.2a1105aa_boundary--  
(back) Subject: list From: "joanne rickards" <jovorick@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 10:31:09 -0400   please take my name off list  
(back) Subject: Re: Defining Moments (X-post) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 10:59:34 EDT     --part1_153.dd10d2f.2a112ed6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/13/02 3:35:36 AM Atlantic Daylight Time, giwro@earthlink.net writes: > > What are your "defining moments" as an organist? In other words, what = are > the key experiences that caused you to fall in love with the pipe organ = and > its music? > First, hearing the pipe organ in the church where I grew up.   Second, being taken on a tour of a pipe organ by the church organist.   The primary experience, though, was simply hearing the music of the pipes.   Bruce in the Muttestery with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_153.dd10d2f.2a112ed6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 5/13/02 3:35:36 AM Atlantic = Daylight Time, giwro@earthlink.net writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> <BR> What are your "defining moments" as an organist?&nbsp; In other words, = what are the key experiences that caused you to fall in love with the pipe = organ and its music?</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">First, hearing the = pipe organ in the church where I grew up.<BR> <BR> Second, being taken on a tour of a pipe organ by the church organist.<BR> <BR> The primary experience, though, was simply hearing the music of the = pipes.<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Bruce in the = Muttestery <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_153.dd10d2f.2a112ed6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Fwd: [Church-Music] Wedding policy From: "Rev. Ed" <edwardorgan@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 15:03:55 +0000   From: "Deloy Chapman" <dchapman@amitechurch.org> Subject: [Church-Music] Wedding policy   List, What are your church's policies concerning time of weddings in your sanctuary (worship center) on Saturdays? Thanks. Deloy Chapman MoM, Amite Baptist Church Denham Springs, LA     _________________________________________________________________ MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos: http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx    
(back) Subject: Re: Defining Moments (X-post) From: "David Carter" <david_n_carter@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 15:39:52 +0000   A couple for me... 1. Going to the local high school auditorium in Salinas CA to hear the Worth/Crow organ duo. 2. Listening to (and wearing out) Virgil's "Encores" album. 3. Discovering and taking a group organ class at the local community college. (We took the class, and practiced on, the A/S at St. Paul's Episcopal in Salinas.)     _________________________________________________________________ Send and receive Hotmail on your mobile device: http://mobile.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Defining Moments (X-post) From: "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 18:18:30 +0100   I had just moved up from Junior to Grammar School, aged 11, and the School's Christmas Carol Concert was held in Norwich Cathedral. Although =   I had been one of the organists at my church for more than a year (the organ was a Compton electronic), that was my first live hearing of a pipe organ and I was totally awe struck; my ardent love of pipe organs stems from that experience, and I have never forgotten that moment. It was to be several years before I actually had the opportunity to play a pipe = organ and be part of that awe-inspiring sound.   Cheryl     http://www.copemanhart.co.uk    
(back) Subject: Atlanta Competition From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 13:39:12 -0400   Dear Friends and Lists,   I got home very late last night from Atlanta, and want to give a bare bones report about the North American Semi-Final Round of the Calgary International Organ Competition, with a very few comments. (More will follow in due course.) There were six three hour recitals in four days, involving 18 players, and if that sounds daunting or fatiguing, let me say that it was not, because of the high quality of the playing, the programming, and the organ. The Ruffatti instrument lives up to its reputation. It is extremely refined and versatile, with wonderful ensemble sounds from pp to ffffff. It also looks great. The concert hall acoustics are splendid and adjustable, although, of course, we only heard the configuration for maximum resonance. The first day, Wednesday, May 8th, we had only one three-hour recital, in the evening. On Thursday, there were two, one at 12:30 and the other at 6:30, with enough time in between to hit the Waffle House. . . . or the Walmart. As the judges came out the door one day from the section of the hall where they were seated, one was heard to say (and I am not sure, but the accent sounded English!), "Let's go. I can't wait to get back to Walmart!" On Friday, there were again two concerts, at the same times as Thursday. On Saturday, there was the final of the six concerts, at 12:30. At 6:30, there was a gala closing concert, which included one piece each from the four players who will compete in Calgary in the Finals. There was also a fine performance of the Tournemire Victimae Paschali by Richard Morris, the resident organist, and we heard several works sung at two points in the program by the Spivey Hall Children's Choir, conductor Dr. Martha Shaw. They are truly fabulous. The quality of the tone is hair-raising from these very complete young musicians, aged 10 to 18. More about that, and the repertoire performed in a separate posting.   The judges, in alphabetical order:   Diane Meredith Belcher James David Christie John Grew James Higdon Patricia Snyder   I would be happy to copy their individual biographies from the program, if anyone would like them.   Simon Preston serves as Artistic Director of the entire competition, including the Asian, European, and North American Semi-Final Rounds. He does not vote in the judging.   The performers in the order in which they played:   Kola Owolabi, Age 24, Toronto - Yale University now Cameron Carpenter, Age 21, New York Eric Suter, Age 29, USA Michelle Rae Martin, Age 25, Canadian, currently studying at Eastman Andrew Henderson, Age 25, Canadian, currently studying at Juilliard Tomaz Sevsek, Age 23, Slovenian, currently studying at Eastman. Sorry about the missing diacriticals. Timothy Olsen, Age 27, USA Jin-Sun Cho, Age 31, Korea - currently teaching at Catholic U. in DC John Schwandt, Age 30, USA Vincent Dubois, Age 21, France Tom Trenney, Age 24, USA Joel Bacon, Age 27, USA - currently, Gruenwald, Germany Sangwha Lee, Age 26, Korea - currently studying at Eastman Christian Schmitt, Age 25, Germany Jonathan Oldengarm, Age 26, Canadian Bradley Welch, Age 26, USA Felix Hell, Age 16, Germany - currently studying at Curtis Institute Svetlana Fehretdinov, Age 25, Russian, currently living in the USA   Not without considerable agonizing did the judges select four to go on to Calgary in August, as finalists. They are:   Tomaz Sevsek Vincent Dubois Christian Schmitt Jonathan Oldengarm   Many who were not selected gave dazzling performances, and I frankly calculated that seven prizes were needed to satisfy me! Please don't ask. One judge told me he had a list of eleven on his potential winners' list, which gives you some idea of the incredible virtuosity and musicality that passed before us each day.   For the first time this year, there was The Antonio Ruffatti Prize "for the best demonstration of the variety of tonal resources of The Albert Schweitzer Memorial Organ" at the North American Selection Round. This prize was given to Vincent Dubois, already one of the four selected to be finalists. It was given for the playing of the Durufle Prelude and Fugue on the name of ALAIN, and the judges were not involved in this selection. Simon Preston alone decided this. Dare I say I was not happy about this decision, for whatever that might be worth, and if I had $4,000 to spare, I would make my own prizes, two of them to relect my feelings. I truly mean that, which is easy to say when I definitely do not have money to spare after this last week! In a sense, this prize ended up being offered for the playing of a particular piece, one which indeed used much of the instrument, and not for one minute could I wish any less success for Vincent, who was spectacular in his performances, and a wonderful young man as well. But that particular piece, the Durufle Prelude and Fugue on the Name ALAIN received another fabulous performance by one other player, Andrew Henderson. He's a personal friend whose playing I admire, but that becomes irrelevant in that the prize had to do, it seems, in this case with the choice of that piece in addition to giving a good performance of it. Would not the prize have better gone to someone who did not already win a place in the finals? But to get me deeper into hot stuff, let me say that by my interpretation of the rules for granting this prize "for the best demonstration of the variety of tonal resources of" the organ, it really belonged to Tom Trenney, who played a program that used the Harp and Zimbelstern, and found somewhere in the soul of this instrument hidden Tibias, Kinuras, and other resources of the Theatre Organ. It was a most unique program, which I will write about in some detail in the days ahead.   Debbie, dear Debbie. Debbie Giesbrecht needs special mention. She was in charge of "operating" this competition, which included looking after the interests of performers and judges, and anyone else who needed looking after. Each time she came on stage to announce another performer, she did so with a set speech that went something like: "Good afternoon, Ladies and Gentlemen. Welcome to the second concert in the 2002 Calgary International Organ Competition in Spivey Hall of Clayton College and State University in Morrow, Georgia. Our first performer is Ezekiel Zink, from Arkadelphia, Arkansas, now living in the United States." I don't really have it right. I've had to make something up, because every time she came on stage to deliver this thing, there were great cheers from the competitors through which it was sometimes impossible to hear the words. Watching her trying to do this, I would swear she did it all on one breath. There was tremendous appreciation for this great lady, who did everything in her power to make the whole experience of participating in this potentially very tense event as comfortable as possible. I suggested to her that at one of the concerts, when she came in, she ought to motion for silence, go to the organ, get on the bench, draw a stop, and play a major triad, raise her hands high as she releases the notes, in a great gesture of having finished, get off the bench and take a bow, at which point there would be what a great comedian and her fellow Canadian used to call "a standing ovulation." It was not to be.   In every way, this competition was a totally first class event. More about that in the report of the final concert and closing ceremonies.   For those with the patience to wade through it, seven reports will follow, one for each concert by three performers, and one concerning the final concert.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler - glad to be home. www.mander-organs.com                
(back) Subject: NYC Baroque Brass EnsembleThis Tuesday From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 15:34:48 EDT   Congregation Emanu-El of the City of New York presents   The Seventh Annual MASTERS OF THE BAROQUE concert series featuring The Saint Luke's Chamber Ensemble   A CELEBRATION OF BAROQUE MUSIC FOR BRASS ENSEMBLE   Tuesday Evening, May 14th, 2002, at 6:30 Admission Free of Charge   Johann Sebastian BACH (1685-1750): Ricercar from "Das Musikalische Opfer," BWV 1079   Giovanni GABRIELI (c.1553-1612): Canzon Primi Toni Conzon Noni Toni Canzon Septimi Toni, N0. 2   Samuel SCHEIDT (1587-1654): Battle Suite Galliard: Battaglia Courant: Dolorosa Canzon: Bergamasque   Tylman SUSATO (c.1500-1561): Renaissance Dances La Mourisque Bransle Quatre Bransles Ronde Ronde - Mon Amy Basse Danse Bergeret   Giovanni GABRIELI (c.1553-1612): Canzon Septimi Toni, No. 1 Sonata Pian'e Forte   Joseph Anderer, Stewart Rose, horns; Carl Albach, Kevin Cobb, David = Drauss, trumpets; Michael Powell, John Rojak, trombones; Kyle Turner, tuba   "Masters of the Baroque" is made possible by the generous support of Robert and Joyce Menschel   Additional support is provided by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation   The Sanctuary Congregation Emanu-El of the City of New York One East 65th Street at Central Park (Fifth Avenue)   The Temple's Museum will be open during the day before the concert; call = for opening hours (212) 744-1400. NEXT WEEK'S CONCERT: ALL-BACH CONCERTI !!!  
(back) Subject: Re: Defining Moments (X-post) From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 17:03:27 -0400   Dear Cheryl, i guess my defining moment in organ interest was listening to Dupre = at St Sulpice on LP, Biggs on 7"tape and Fox on LP. Ironically the Fox was a copy of an LP which was taped in Korat Thailand by an Army buddy of mine. = He taped the record while packing up his hold baggage and you can hear the = blow of the hammer during the recording session which was done in his hotch. From that time on, I was hooked on organ as an avocation. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, May 13, 2002 1:18 PM Subject: Re: Defining Moments (X-post)     > I had just moved up from Junior to Grammar School, aged 11, and the > School's Christmas Carol Concert was held in Norwich Cathedral. = Although > I had been one of the organists at my church for more than a year (the > organ was a Compton electronic), that was my first live hearing of a = pipe > organ and I was totally awe struck; my ardent love of pipe organs stems > from that experience, and I have never forgotten that moment. It was = to > be several years before I actually had the opportunity to play a pipe organ > and be part of that awe-inspiring sound. > > Cheryl > > > http://www.copemanhart.co.uk > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Defining Moments From: <ORGANUT@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 19:05:54 EDT     --part1_40.1dae8a9d.2a11a0d2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     In a message dated 5/13/02 3:35:36 AM Atlantic Daylight Time, giwro@earthlink.net writes: > > What are your "defining moments" as an organist? In other words, what = are > the key experiences that caused you to fall in love with the pipe organ = and > its music? > > Hearing the Theatre pipe organ being played over the radio. 1950-1951 > > Hearing, and watching from the balcony, the organist at First Baptist > Church. And years later finding out it was a Wurlitzer taken out of a > Theatre and placed in the church during the Second World War. > > The clincher was being asked by a local organist to accompany him to a > local Theatre to help get the organ going. The Theatre wanted to sell = it. > I played the clarinet and saxophone in the Jr. High band. When I heard = the > organ, I thought it sounded just like our band. The Theatre manager = asked > me to go into one of the pipe chambers and remove several pipes that = were > ciphering. When I pushed open the door and heard the flood of sound = rush > out, I was awestruck. When I turned on the light switch and saw all of = the > different mechanical parts of the organ nested in the chamber, I am sure =   > that I experienced the same emotion that Howard Carter did when he = peered > through a small hole in the seal to King Tut's tomb and saw nothing but = the > glitter of GOLD. What a RUSH this experience was.   It became my lifelong dream to learn to play one of these magnificent instruments > and to own one. That dream has been realized. I feel very lucky and blessed.   When I started looking around for an instrument, a friend of mine, Dolton McAlpin, sent me a cassette tape titled, Organs of the South. One of the instruments recorded on this tape was the instrument removed from the = Saenger Theatre in Biloxi, Miss. many years before. The very instrument that = kindled my interest. It had been installed in a residence in Mobile, Alabama. = Talk about WEIRD!!!!!   Later, Phil Lyons Jr.             --part1_40.1dae8a9d.2a11a0d2_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2> <BR>In a message dated 5/13/02 3:35:36 AM Atlantic Daylight Time, = giwro@earthlink.net writes: <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> <BR>What are your "defining moments" as an organist? &nbsp;In other words, = what are the key experiences that caused you to fall in love with the pipe = organ and its music? <BR> <BR>Hearing the Theatre pipe organ being played over the radio. = &nbsp;1950-1951 <BR> <BR>Hearing, and watching from the balcony, the organist at First Baptist = Church. And years later finding out it was a Wurlitzer taken out of a = Theatre and placed in the church during the Second World War. <BR> &nbsp; <BR>The clincher was being asked by a local organist to accompany him to a = local Theatre to help get the organ going. &nbsp;The Theatre wanted to = sell it. &nbsp;I played the clarinet and saxophone in the Jr. High band. = When I heard the organ, I thought it sounded just like our band. &nbsp;The = Theatre manager asked me to go into one of the pipe chambers and remove = several pipes that were ciphering. &nbsp;When I pushed open the door and = heard the flood of sound rush out, I was awestruck. &nbsp;When I turned on = the light switch and saw all of the different mechanical parts of the = organ nested in the chamber, I am sure that I experienced the same emotion = that Howard Carter did when he peered through a small hole in the seal to = King Tut's tomb and saw nothing but the glitter of GOLD. &nbsp;What a RUSH = this experience was.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> &nbsp;&nbsp;It became my lifelong dream to = learn to play one of these magnificent instruments </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px">and to own one.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> &nbsp;That = dream has been realized. &nbsp;I feel very lucky and blessed. <BR> <BR>When I started looking around for an instrument, a friend of mine, = Dolton McAlpin, sent me a cassette tape titled, Organs of the South. = &nbsp;One of the instruments recorded on this tape was the instrument = removed from the Saenger Theatre in Biloxi, Miss. many years before. = &nbsp;The very instrument that kindled my interest. &nbsp;It had been = installed in a residence in Mobile, Alabama. &nbsp;Talk about WEIRD!!!!! <BR> <BR>Later, <BR>Phil Lyons Jr.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_40.1dae8a9d.2a11a0d2_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Defining Moments From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 19:14:04 EDT     --part1_13e.e4da1cb.2a11a2bc_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I think for me it was when I played the big ole Reuter at Oklahoma Baptist =   University for the first time. Before that, I had been primarily a = pianist, because that was all we had in the little churches in which I grew up.   Then, while at the University, I accompanied our Glee Club on several selections on our concert tours, including the famed Casavant at = University Baptist Church of Coral Gables, Florida.   Having persons come up to me and ask, "Would you come to be our organist?" =   naturally got me to thinking.   When I was a very small boy, we would arrive at our little church VERY = early. I would hop on the bench of the old Hammond, and push the "start" button, count to 10, and engage the "run" button just at the right moment, then spend several minutes playing that little organ.   Perhaps that was the defining period of my life?   God is good, isn't he?   Neil Brown Barnegat, NJ USA   --part1_13e.e4da1cb.2a11a2bc_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0">I think for me it was when I played the big ole = Reuter at Oklahoma Baptist University for the first time.&nbsp; Before = that, I had been primarily a pianist, because that was all we had in the = little churches in which I grew up.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> Then, while at the University, I accompanied our Glee Club on several = selections on our concert tours, including the famed Casavant at = University Baptist Church of Coral Gables, Florida.<BR> <BR> Having persons come up to me and ask, "Would you come to be our organist?" = naturally got me to thinking.<BR> <BR> When I was a very small boy, we would arrive at our little church VERY = early. I would hop on the bench of the old Hammond, and push the "start" = button, count to 10, and engage the "run" button just at the right moment, = then&nbsp; spend several minutes playing that little organ.<BR> <BR> Perhaps that was the defining period of my life?&nbsp; <BR> <BR> God is good, isn't he?<BR> <BR> Neil Brown<BR> Barnegat, NJ USA<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_13e.e4da1cb.2a11a2bc_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: ALL READ!!!! IMPORTANT - VIRUS WARNING From: "Scott Davis" <stalan@ix.netcom.com> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 18:13:32 -0500   I read the PipeChat list in digest format. Am I correct in understanding these viri/worms etc. cannot be passed on via the Digest?   The Digest #2847 - Sunday, May 12, 2002 contained a very long string of ?code? from "mjolnir" as did the Digest #2849 - Sunday, May 12, 2002 from "manderusa".   Scott Davis Austin, Texas      
(back) Subject: Re: ALL READ!!!! IMPORTANT - VIRUS WARNING From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Mon, 13 May 2002 18:56:46 -0500       Scott Davis wrote:   > I read the PipeChat list in digest format. Am I correct > in understanding these viri/worms etc. cannot be > passed on via the Digest? > > The Digest #2847 - Sunday, May 12, 2002 contained > a very long string of ?code? from "mjolnir" as did the > Digest #2849 - Sunday, May 12, 2002 from "manderusa".   The message purporting to be from me (which I did not send, BTW) cannot be executed from within the digest. I expect that there is a mens by which it could be extracted from the message, and made into an executable file (which is what the virus has to be); I doubt that it can be executed from within the virus, however.   More troubling, is an occurrence I experienced today: I received a copy of (I assume) the same virus apparently from an email message an address offered in the list footers of another list for the purpose of unsubscribing, suggesting to me that the virus in question is harvesting return addresses from the body of messages, rather than just from address books.   ns