PipeChat Digest #2858 - Friday, May 17, 2002
 
Re: first rehearsal in new church (X-posted)
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re:  Olsen, Cho, and Schwandt
  by "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
Re: first rehearsal in new church
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
I'm only Outgoing, but you knew that already
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
We're Back Online
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Ken Cowan at Syracuse Episcopal Cathedral
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Ken Cowan at Syracuse Episcopal Cathedral - correction
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
The Day of Pentecost (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: first rehearsal in new church (X-posted)
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Atlanta 4: Dubois, Trenney, Bacon
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: first rehearsal in new church (X-posted) From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Thu, 16 May 2002 07:32:29 -0400   Dear Bud, You deserved every bit of happiness and joy for all you have gone through with this assignment. God Bless. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "+mailing list, ANGLICAN-MUSIC" <anglican-music@list.stsams.org>; "organchat" <organchat@egroups.com>; "pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2002 2:29 AM Subject: first rehearsal in new church (X-posted)     > WOW! > > Three seconds reverb at LEAST, and that's with all the padded pews > installed, so it's not going to come down MUCH, even when the church is > full. > > The old Allen sounds WONDERFUL (well, toaster-wonderful) ... the big > organ chamber REALLY helps. > > It'll take the choir awhile to adjust ... they're used to having to > SHOUT to be heard in a dead room. But they LOVED it. > > I've been at St. Matthew's for five years, and I've never really HEARD > the choir until tonight. > > Some of the building committee was downstairs listening ... they were > ecstatic. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Olsen, Cho, and Schwandt From: "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Thu, 16 May 2002 06:54:42 -0700 (PDT)   Thank you, Malcolm, for a fine review, especially for your remarks on John Schwandt! John and I graduated from IU together last December...and several of our students with us! (Between us, I think we taught just about every music student at IU at one time or another!) We both served as ear-training coordinators, and I was always blown away by his musical skills. His degree recitals included improvisation, as a rule, and these were always very exciting--as one would expect from the 1998 Improv competition winner!   For the record, John is also an extremely friendly, approachable, jovial and gregarious fellow, someone who truly belongs in academia teaching and inspiring a new generation.   Thanks again for reviewing him so positively!   Best,   Jonathan NYC   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? LAUNCH - Your Yahoo! Music Experience http://launch.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: first rehearsal in new church From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 May 2002 10:20:36 EDT   Hey Bud:   You are a ringing endorsement for live acoustics. I've got to drop over and hear this. Perhaps a private audience, as I'm busy playing when you're playing. Just wait until the pipe organ arrives, you'll be like a kid let loose in a candy shoppe with a $100.00 bill. You will have to be careful not to bring the roof down, like that Romanian organist did. http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_586918.html Above is the story. Too much 32' and big trumpet reeds. :)   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: I'm only Outgoing, but you knew that already From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 16 May 2002 10:53:46 -0400   Friends,   Earthlink is unable to bring us our mail this morning, at least it has been unable for the last couple of hours. A test shows that outgoing mail is unaffected.   I can be reached until the problem is solved, at mwechsler@palm.net Important messages, like professions of immortal love and stuff like that will be gratefully received. Very long messages are not too handy, although possible.   Thanks,   Malcolm              
(back) Subject: We're Back Online From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 16 May 2002 13:53:37 -0400   Dear Ones,   Our e-mail, courtesy of earthlink, has just begun to flow again. I am giving serious thought to several marriage proposals and other nice sentiments that I received on the Palm. Thank you all.   Nothing could me more off topic than this. Apologies for that.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com      
(back) Subject: Ken Cowan at Syracuse Episcopal Cathedral From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 16 May 2002 19:58:39 -0500   Anyone within reach of Syracuse, New York, might like to note that on Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 4 p.m., Ken Cowan, Concert Organist, will give the Inaugural Organ Recital at St. Paul's Cathedral (Episcopal). Admission free, but a free will offering will be taken.   Details of the organ, which has been rebuilt by Quimby Pipe Organs, Inc., Warrensburg, Missouri, in consultation with the cathedral's organist and choirmaster, Jim Potts, will be found on the the cathedral's website at:   http://www.saintpaulscathedral.org/music/organ_project.htm   To this I might add that although much of the mechanism and some of the pipework from the previous Ernest White Moller has been retained, all the old pipework except for the Trompette-en-Chamade has been revoiced, and in some cases rescaled as well. The instrument is thus to all intents and purposes a new one so far as tonal design is concerned. It is conceived very much in the English cathedral style and has an unusually large = variety of color reeds. The timid should be forewarned that the stop list = includes a full-length 32' reed and a Tuba on 28" wind!   For those unfamiliar with him (of which I don't imagine there can be = many!), Ken Cowan is a fantastic player and this promises to be a very exciting recital.   Directions for finding the cathedral can be found at   http://www.saintpaulscathedral.org/about/directions.html   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Ken Cowan at Syracuse Episcopal Cathedral - correction From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 16 May 2002 20:06:14 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00CF_01C1FD15.21E9DE40 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"Windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   [For some reason the "l" of html in the address of the organ =3D specification on the website did not transmit the first time (for once I = =3D had it typed correctly), so I am sending this message again. Please =3D ignore the first one!]   Anyone within reach of Syracuse, New York, might like to note that on Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 4 p.m., Ken Cowan, Concert Organist, will give =3D the Inaugural Organ Recital at St. Paul's Cathedral (Episcopal). Admission free, but a free will offering will be taken.   Details of the organ, which has been rebuilt by Quimby Pipe Organs, =3D Inc., Warrensburg, Missouri, in consultation with the cathedral's organist and choirmaster, Jim Potts, will be found on the the cathedral's website at:   http://www.saintpaulscathedral.org/music/organ_project.html   To this I might add that although much of the mechanism and some of the pipework from the previous Ernest White Moller has been retained, all =3D the old pipework except for the Trompette-en-Chamade has been revoiced, and = =3D in some cases rescaled as well. The instrument is thus to all intents and purposes a new one so far as tonal design is concerned. It is conceived very much in the English cathedral style and has an unusually large =3D variety of color reeds. The timid should be forewarned that the stop list =3D includes a full-length 32' reed and a Tuba on 28" wind!   For those unfamiliar with him (of which I don't imagine there can be =3D many!), Ken Cowan is a fantastic player and this promises to be a very exciting recital.   Directions for finding the cathedral can be found at   http://www.saintpaulscathedral.org/about/directions.html   John Speller         ------=3D_NextPart_000_00CF_01C1FD15.21E9DE40 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"Windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Dwindows-1252" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>[For some reason the "l" of html in = the =3D address of=3D20 the organ specification on the website did not transmit the first time =3D (for once=3D20 I had it typed correctly), so I am sending this message again.&nbsp; =3D Please=3D20 ignore the first one!]</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Anyone within reach of Syracuse, New = =3D York, might=3D20 like to note that on<BR>Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 4 p.m., Ken Cowan, =3D Concert=3D20 Organist, will give the<BR>Inaugural Organ Recital at St. Paul's =3D Cathedral=3D20 (Episcopal).&nbsp; Admission<BR>free, but a free will offering will = be=3D20 taken.<BR><BR>Details of the organ, which has been rebuilt by Quimby =3D Pipe=3D20 Organs, Inc.,<BR>Warrensburg, Missouri, in consultation with the =3D cathedral's=3D20 organist and<BR>choirmaster, Jim Potts, will be found on the the =3D cathedral's=3D20 website at:<BR></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://www.saintpaulscathedral.org/music/organ_project.html">http= =3D ://www.saintpaulscathedral.org/music/organ_project.html</A></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><BR></FONT><FONT face=3D3DArial =3D size=3D3D2>To this I might=3D20 add that although much of the mechanism and some of the<BR>pipework from = =3D the=3D20 previous Ernest White Moller has been retained, all the<BR>old pipework = =3D except=3D20 for the Trompette-en-Chamade has been revoiced, and in<BR>some cases =3D rescaled as=3D20 well.&nbsp; The instrument is thus to all intents and<BR>purposes a new = =3D one so=3D20 far as tonal design is concerned.&nbsp; It is conceived<BR>very much in = =3D the=3D20 English cathedral style and has an unusually large variety<BR>of = color=3D20 reeds.&nbsp; The timid should be forewarned that the stop list =3D includes<BR>a=3D20 full-length 32' reed and a Tuba on 28" wind!<BR><BR>For those unfamiliar = =3D with=3D20 him (of which I don't imagine there can be many!),<BR>Ken Cowan is a =3D fantastic=3D20 player and this promises to be a very =3D exciting<BR>recital.<BR><BR>Directions for=3D20 finding the cathedral can be found at<BR><BR><A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://www.saintpaulscathedral.org/about/directions.html">http://= =3D www.saintpaulscathedral.org/about/directions.html</A><BR><BR>John=3D20 Speller<BR><BR><BR></DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00CF_01C1FD15.21E9DE40--    
(back) Subject: The Day of Pentecost (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 16 May 2002 18:27:41 -0700   St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church 2300 Ford Road (at Bonita Canyon and Prairie Roads, off the 73 Toll Road) Newport Beach CA USA   The Day of Pentecost - Pontifical Solemn Mass with Confirmation   Voluntary - Come Holy Ghost, God and Lord - Buxtehude Processional - O Come, Creator Spirit, Come - St. Patrick's Breastplate Introit - Spiritus Domini - Dr. Willan Setting - Willan / Scottish Chant Alleluia - Emitte Spiritum tuum / Veni, Sancte Spiritus - Dr. Willan Sequence - Veni, Sancte Spiritus - Palestrina Offertory - Confirma hoc - Dr. Willan Anthem - Veni, Sancte Spiritus - Mozart Communion Verse - Factus est - Dr. Willan Motet - Ave verum - Mozart Hymn - Rejoice, The Year Upon Its Way - Mechlin chant Recessional - Glorious Things of Thee Are Spoken - Austria Voluntary - Come God, Creator, Holy Ghost (Leipzig) - Bach   Cheers,   Bud  
(back) Subject: RE: first rehearsal in new church (X-posted) From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 16 May 2002 21:32:25 -0500   I'm so thrilled for you, Bud - I hope it makes all the trials and tribulations worth while. Keep us posted.   Glenda Sutton          
(back) Subject: Atlanta 4: Dubois, Trenney, Bacon From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 17 May 2002 03:05:57 -0400   Dear Lists and Friends,   T.G.I.F. in Atlanta. The opening recital of this day, at 12:30, was by VINCENT DUBOIS, Age 21. He is studying with Olivier Latry at the Paris Conservatoire, is teaching composition at the Conservatory in Angers, and, get this, is now titular organist at the Cathedral of Soissons!   He began with the Bach D Major Prelude & Fugue, played from memory. The beginning was very quick and clean, but the second section was at a reduced tempo, and gradually he lost momentum somewhat, so that by the end, it was a bit somber. His registration was really lovely. I'm not sure what it all was. The Fugue was fast but sure, if a tiny bit frantic at the end. Despite what struck me as minor tempo infelicities, as mentioned above, this performance was really interesting and stylish.   We then heard a wonderfully tender performance of the Durufle Prelude & Fugue on ALAIN, a piece that I feel very tenderly about! Does anyone not? I have never heard the Fugue played at such a gentle pace and so very lovingly. At the Pedal entry, the tempo picked up, and it was go all the way to a terrific conclusion.   The Liszt Ad Nos was pure magic, and one of the features of this performance was its clarity of touch, and the incontrovertible presence of a powerful piano technique. He had obviously worked hard on registration, and used the organ very imaginatively. The whole effort was really wonderful all the way, and I do think we realized we were hearing a rather special musical personality, and someone who communicated his music to the listener in a special way.   And, in fact, after hearing Vincent play, I was caused to ponder the meaning of charisma as a factor in audience communication, an inexact science at best. Obviously, one listener might be effected by the charismatic emanations from one player while another might be receiving no signals at all, although there is perhaps a broad range of whatever the charismatic aura is that will effect a large majority of listeners. And in my mind, charisma does not include gimmicks or trick behaviors. It does not to me mean added glissandi, terrifying tempi, dramatic hand gestures, or Virgil's light shows, which probably attracted a new constituency to his recitals. I am not implying anything negative about any of that at all, but this thing of which I write is a subtle something else. It could be just a smile, a bow or other way of acknowledging the welcoming applause, some sort of body language, I suppose even what is worn, but it not just some thing done, but rather a total personality package. I think one knows it when one is in the presence of this phenomenon, as we just had been. If the judging concerned itself with who might have a bit of an edge in building a successful concert career, then my little band of charismatics might have won the day, except that, in fact, there were six that I so anointed, two too many. I guess there is no harm in my naming names. I don't consider my opinion definitive, and others may have heard things I did not hear or will have not heard things I heard. So be it. And, of course, among those whom I thought perhaps did not have this extra, non musical, hard to explain or prove dimension, were some fabulous players. My merry band of charismatics in order of appearance included: Tomaz Sevsek, Vincent Dubois, Tom Trenney, Jonathan Oldengarm, Bradley Welch, and Felix Hell.   Next up at bat, TOM TRENNEY, Age 24, who has a Bachelor's from the Cleveland Institute with Todd Wilson, and has just completed a graduate degree at Eastman, and, it can be told, is going to a new and wonderful-sounding church position in Michigan. It's a lucky church that gets this guy. I first met him and got to know him as person and musician when he taught at our POE in Danbury, CT last summer. He was a tremendous hit with the students, and took part in recitals, including one on the superb Marr and Colton Theatre Organ at the Thomaston Opera House. Out of the repertoire rules for this competition, he managed to fashion what I am sure was the most imaginative program of the whole affair, and he played it all to perfection.   First, the ubiquitous Bruhns E Minor Praeludium, but with a difference. The opening was fantasy-like, a gentle, fluty second section, then a quite brassy fantasy, followed by a bright section with zimbelstern. This may have raised an eyebrow or two, but hell, the Germans don't only use these things at Christmas, I suspect! His ornamentation was wonderfully fluid throughout, the playing was bold where called for, and very gentle and sweet where this was wanted. It was very exciting throughout. This was followed by a short <Tierce en taille> from a Suite on the second tone by J.A.G. Guilain, again beautifully ornamented, a lovely cantilena with a voluptuous Tierce registration.   This was followed by the Bach Jig Fugue, which began on quiet flutes with echoes, and built. It was precise, totally accurate, and just an amazing, even inspired choice for the required Bach work. Who would have thought it? There followed one of those performances of a non-bombastic work which, after they end, cause the audience to remain in silence for a time before applauding, because they are so moved and are not in a rush to break the spell. This was the Franck Fantaisie in A, a piece that kind of puts me through the wringer, anyway. Then, we heard the Vierne Impromptu, played as though it were effortless.   Then, we had two lovely bits of unusual recital fare. First was Irish Air from County Derry, arranged by Edwin Lemare. Name that tune! Tom really worked hard at the registration possibilities presented by this piece. In its quiet and generally wonderfully slushy way, it was amazing, even giving us a chance to hear the Harp! He finished with the astonishing Free Fantasia on "O Zion Haste," and "How Firm a Foundation" by William Bolcom. He's got the whole tradition of Gospel playing down pat. It really was great fun, and I am not sure Mr. Ruffatti was around by this time. I think he just made it near the end, but I think he'd have been amazed at hearing what his instrument is capable of! This recital possibly gets the non-existent prize for being the most entertaining. It was all from memory, by the way.   JOEL BACON, Age 27, is a California person who now lives in Germany. He studied with Joyce Jones at Baylor (who was in attendance for the last half of the competition), but took a B. S. in Mathematics, and later, a Master of Music Degree (1998). He is now studying in Vienna with Michael Gailit, and is enrolled in a PhD program at the University for Music, also in Vienna.   He began his program with the Dupre Variations on a Noel, which was a pleasure to hear again, after having missed them for several years. This was done from memory. The early bits seemed a bit "square" but he came into his own in those later frenetic variations, and brought it all to a smashing finish.   For the Bach requirement, he played the Bach/Vivaldi A Minor, and the first movement was very neatly done. The slow movement was wonderfully soulful. In the last movement, there was a lovely subtle flexibility which I quite enjoyed. Well done, this.   Mr. Bacon gave us our second performance of the Reger Wie Schoen, and for this, out came the music - no shame in that. There had been trouble with the memory card system of this organ during the week, and at the beginning of this piece, there seemed to be something wrong and I believe it was plaguing and distracting him throughout. I also did not have the sense that this rather enormous work was sufficiently seasoned for him to play under the extra stress of a competition. It felt and looked like hard work, and did not quite measure up to his hopes for it.   On the other hand, the Heiller Tanz-Toccata seemed like a perfect vehicle for this player - the performance was wonderful, up to and including the rather dramatic ending, a great achievement.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com