PipeChat Digest #2866 - Wednesday, May 22, 2002
 
RE: A voicer in church
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: ORGAN AD
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Correct that typo
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Von Beckerath photos
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Von Beckerath
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: A voicer in church
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: organbuilders as creative artists
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Re: organbuilders as creative artists
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Horatio Parker Concerto
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
RE: organbuilders as creative artists
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
Re: A voicer in church
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
American pipe organs in Asia
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: organbuilders as creative artists
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: American pipe organs in Asia
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: organbuilders as creative artists
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Reduced to Tierce
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: American pipe organs in Asia
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: organbuilders as creative artists
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: American pipe organs in Asia
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: A voicer in church From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 13:30:59 +0100   Hello,   Herr Gluck's post is revealing.   Is THIS why American organ-building seems to be so very good at the = present time?   Get rid of all that extension and duplication nonsense and the USA could = be a net exporter of fine organs to Europe!!   (That should bring the claws out!! he he)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       -----Original Message----- From: "pipechat@pipechat.org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> on behalf of = "TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com> Sent: 21 May 2002 13:24 To: "pipechat@pipechat.org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: A voicer in church   Well, if there is only one tuner in New Zealand who can play, that's a = shame. In the United States, many organbuilders and voicers have conservatory=20 training and hold church positions.   SMG   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: ORGAN AD From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 10:24:53 -0400   On 5/21/02 11:18 PM, "TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com> wrote:   > Dear Pipe Chatters" > There is, I believe, a three-manual Hutchings pipe organ in the rear > gallery of the church in question. When I last saw it, before the parking= of > the new organ in the nave, it was tonally unaltered, although I do not kn= ow > its present status.   I'm told that the fa=E7ade pipes of that gallery organ are hand painted in gold by the studios of Mr. Tiffany, who also has a major window in the building.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Correct that typo From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 10:52:06 -0400   You'll all know that it's   beckerath.com   of course.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Von Beckerath photos From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 11:33:41 -0400       > To see photos of the recently-mentioned von Beckerath, go to their website: > > www.beckerath.com > It's NOT the low, wide one first listed under Company News, but scroll = down to another one, after the Russian installations. Tall, narrow. 12x15x25h   Alan    
(back) Subject: Von Beckerath From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 11:35:53 -0400   Did I send this? I'm messed up this morning.   Here's the latest I have, Karl:   [This is a note I just sent to Malcolm Wechsler.]   Well, it exists.   Built by von Beckerath for the residence of one Dr. Reeder of Wichita. Three manuals, one of which is for couplers or positiv, or whatever, whatever that means. Reeder cut back on the new addition to his house, = and backed out of the deal. Paid for the thing, but bought instead a smaller one for actual installation. Just a year or two back. Asking $365k plus labor in NYC to put it up at Trinity Church, 100th St., around the corner from Saint Michael's' von Beckerath; it's in use.   23'6" high; 15' wide; 11'6" deep including pedalboard. Specs available at www.beckerath.com, under "company news," where it's known as Reeder 1 (as contrasted to the second one, Reeder 2). Probably will accept $275k.   D. Bish has expressed interested, but is backing away.   VonB's man is Anthony Maloni, now servicing their machines in Hawaii, but reachable at 914 843 4766. His shop (Maloni & Sarrier) is in Portchester, Westchester County, where he competes against our guy, Tim Fink, for maintenance work on trackers and stuff. He'll be back on the mainland in = a couple weeks or so. He LIVES in Manhattan, tho P'chester is his home = town, and home of his parents. 22 stops; 28 ranks.   Maloni called me from Hawaii this afternoon, and I understood MOST, but = NOT ALL of what he said. He'll welcome calls. V. pleasant guy. My guess is that you know him. His corporate history is Odell, leading to = v.Beckerath.   Interesting tale, nicht wahr? We gotta find a home for this thing.   Second subject: See www.intintim-musik.se re some interesting recordings = re Gertrudenmusik. It'll make an incurable Lutheran out of you. Or so I'm told by our Evangelism Department!!   Alan      
(back) Subject: RE: A voicer in church From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 18:06:25 +0100             Hello,   Herr Gluck's post is revealing.   Is THIS why American organ-building seems to be so very good at the = present time?   Get rid of all that extension and duplication nonsense and the USA could = be a net exporter of fine organs to Europe!!   (That should bring the claws out!! he he)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       -----Original Message----- From: "pipechat@pipechat.org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> on behalf of = "TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com> Sent: 21 May 2002 13:24 To: "pipechat@pipechat.org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: A voicer in church   Well, if there is only one tuner in New Zealand who can play, that's a = shame. In the United States, many organbuilders and voicers have conservatory=20 training and hold church positions.   SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 18:01:14 +0000   Ralph Downes may have been deaf in one ear - though I can assure you in = the three years I studied with him he never miseed a wrong note! The other ear =   worked pretty well. Ralph never claimed to be a builder - but he did know the sound he wanted, and who to go to get it. John Foss     _________________________________________________________________ MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos: http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx    
(back) Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 07:14:06 +1200   And now, my London organist friend assures me, the RGH organ is very = rarely used as people intensely dislike both the organ and the acoustics of the Hall itself. Not making any value judgment, just noting that "taste" is = such an ephemeral thing. Ross -----Original Message----- From: John Foss <harfo32@hotmail.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, May 23, 2002 6:02 AM Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists     >Ralph Downes may have been deaf in one ear - though I can assure you in = the >three years I studied with him he never miseed a wrong note! The other = ear >worked pretty well. Ralph never claimed to be a builder - but he did know >the sound he wanted, and who to go to get it. >John Foss > > >_________________________________________________________________ >MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos: >http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Horatio Parker Concerto From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 14:36:21 -0400   December of this year marks the 100th anniv. of the Horatio Parker concerto. It's a fine piece, though not very popular with most orchestras and seldom the choice for organists on those few occasions when they get a chance to perform with an orchestra. Yet, performances this Fall or early in 2003 wou\ld seem appropriate, = not only because they'd be wonderful at any time but because of the = round-figure anniversary. (No, you don't need an organist with a round figure also to perform it!!)   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: RE: organbuilders as creative artists From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 15:01:02 -0500   I may have a candidate who meets Colin's criteria below. In 1979 Karl Wilhelm installed one of his instruments in = my church, and I must have fed him so much BS that he sent his assistant packing and called up Hans-Ueli Metzler in Zurich and convinced him to = come over to Northfield, Illinois, to help him voice and finish for two weeks. Metzler, Wilhelm's mentor, agreed, and it was a real treat for me to talk and work with them for a fortnight.   Metzler can build ("could" at this point, perhaps?), design, voice, finish, AND play. He brought a nobility and majesty to Bach that was quite special.   Bob Lind         cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk RE: organbuilders as creative artists   I look forward to the day when an organ-builder can design, voice, finish and then play the organ he = creates. In fact, I simply cannot imagine how an organ-builder can fully understand the craft and the art without a thorough MUSICAL knowledge. Maybe MOST organ-builders are merely "factory organ makers".   Colin Mitchell UK      
(back) Subject: Re: A voicer in church From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 17:19:35 EDT     --part1_81.1bf7dc55.2a1d6567_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/22/2002 8:32:01 AM Eastern Daylight Time, cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk writes:     > Get rid of all that extension and duplication nonsense and the USA could = be > a net exporter of fine organs to Europe!! > >   I don't know about europe, BUT there are several american organs in JAPAN built by some of america's best (tracker) organbuilding firms. Taylor and Boody have 4 there already and I know they have talked at various times = with churches/schoolds in other countries as well.   Rick in VA   --part1_81.1bf7dc55.2a1d6567_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 5/22/2002 8:32:01 AM Eastern Daylight Time, cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk = writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Get rid of all = that extension and duplication nonsense and the USA could be a net = exporter of fine organs to Europe!! <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>I don't know about europe, BUT there are several american organs in = JAPAN built by some of america's best (tracker) organbuilding firms. = Taylor and Boody have 4 there already and I know they have talked at = various times with churches/schoolds in other countries as well. <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_81.1bf7dc55.2a1d6567_boundary--  
(back) Subject: American pipe organs in Asia From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 19:41:50 EDT   American pipe organs have been exported to Asia for over a century. = While once primarily the realm of factory builders producing electropneumatic = (and electric-action) instruments, the trend in recent decades has been toward = the keen interest in mechanical action instruments based upon historical = models. English and north European firms have also enjoyed installations in Korea, China, Japan, and the oft-overlooked African continent. During the =   nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, more English and European organs =   made it abroad, simply because they had established themselves during = periods of colonialism, with resident populations of expatriots founding parishes away from home. While pipe organ construction is still a viable artform worldwide, the =   American scene at this point remains the most exciting in the eyes of = many. Certainly, the quality of many American pipe organs, both tonally and mechanically, is extraordinary, and more knowledgeable than ever. This is =   due, in part, to the musical and historical education of the builders, a point discussed earlier. Our overseas PipeChatters may wish to meet American organbuilders, = hear and tour their instruments, and attend their lectures, at the October Convention of the American Institute of Organbuilders in Los Angeles, California.   http://www.pipeorgan.org/   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 20:45:13 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 2:14 PM Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists     > And now, my London organist friend assures me, the RGH organ is very rarely > used as people intensely dislike both the organ and the acoustics of the > Hall itself. Not making any value judgment, just noting that "taste" is such > an ephemeral thing.   I am not sure it is even just a question of taste being ephemeral. There = is a good case to be made that many people have never liked the RFH organ. I recall my old organ teacher telling me that he had visited Harrison & Harrison in the late 1950's. They were telling him all about their latest instruments, and he asked, "And what about the Royal Festival Hall?" = There was an awkward silence, after he was told, "We prefer not to talk about = that one!"   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 20:51:42 -0500   Because of chronic server problems we finally broke down and subscribed to DirecTV's internet satellite service. Rick had them install it today right in front of a window, which did not sit (or is it "set"?) well with me and will cost me another $200 now if I want to move it. But at least the installers killed all the area wasp nests for us.   What a blast! Now I can listen to PipeDreams via internet, and have a much higher speed than I did, plus more dependable service. In fact, I have just spent the last hour listening to PipeDreams, with "The Seven Year Itch" on TV and muted, a book in my hands, a box of White Cheddar Cheez-It's by my side, and a cat in my lap. How utterly decadent! If it's not enough that I get to hear the program now on radio at 9:00 on Sunday mornings before church, now I can finally access it via internet! (Although the quality is not quite as good with the latter.) And I discovered that the piece that the visiting Methodist minister played in February was the Bach "Wir glauben all an einen Gott", S. 680.   I'm listening to Gordon Turk play the Ocean City organ via CD in my car, thanks to my friend's gift of CDs. I had the first pangs of regret that next Sunday is my last at the St. A's organ, for I started thinking of the projects or pieces I had laid out to learn this year. So although a major chapter is closing, the flames of desire are still being stoked.   Now I must figure out how to change my e-mail address on the e-mail lists, a daunting task for me.   Glenda Sutton, now at gksjd85@direcway.com      
(back) Subject: Re: American pipe organs in Asia From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 20:56:42 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 6:41 PM Subject: American pipe organs in Asia     > American pipe organs have been exported to Asia for over a century. While > once primarily the realm of factory builders producing electropneumatic (and > electric-action) instruments, the trend in recent decades has been = toward the > keen interest in mechanical action instruments based upon historical models.   As a historical footnote to this, however, it may be noted that Ernest M. Skinner exported one of the only two tracker organs his firm ever built to Japan (The other went to the Edison Laboratory at the Henry Ford Museum to replace a Roosevelt tracker destroyed by fire.)   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 15:03:12 +1200   Tell me more about this H&H opinion of their own work at the RFH. What is H&H's opinion, for example, of their Coventry Cathedral organ? I found it not even beginning to measure up in quality to the Southwark Cathedral Lewis that H&H themselves did up so superlatively well. We have a very large 3-m&P H&H in Auckland Cathedral here in NZ from the early 1960s, with 2 32fts, en chamades, etc., but I've never liked the = tone. The organ is large, powerful, but not beautiful or charming in any sense. Too, the design has many grave faults. Ross -----Original Message----- From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@mindspring.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, May 23, 2002 1:50 PM Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists     >----- Original Message ----- >From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> >To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 2:14 PM >Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists > > >> And now, my London organist friend assures me, the RGH organ is very >rarely >> used as people intensely dislike both the organ and the acoustics of = the >> Hall itself. Not making any value judgment, just noting that "taste" is >such >> an ephemeral thing. > >I am not sure it is even just a question of taste being ephemeral. There is >a good case to be made that many people have never liked the RFH organ. = I >recall my old organ teacher telling me that he had visited Harrison & >Harrison in the late 1950's. They were telling him all about their = latest >instruments, and he asked, "And what about the Royal Festival Hall?" = There >was an awkward silence, after he was told, "We prefer not to talk about that >one!" > >John Speller > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Reduced to Tierce From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 22:41:22 EDT   Ladies and Gentlemen:   Just a note to clarify what I have said, the past, regarding the Larigot= : I did not say that the Larigot belongs on the Choir, but rather that the= =20 Larigot does not exist in a vacuum. It is part of a specific series of=20 mutations in most schools of organbuilding, especially the French Classic,=20 and it is introduced AFTER the Nasard and Tierce are in place.=20 The Cornet Decompos=E9, with its independently drawn pitches extending t= he=20 full compass of the keyboard, is most often found on the Positif. Nasard,=20 Quart de Nasard, Tierce, and Larigot form the series. Flutes at 4' pitch ar= e=20 VERY rare and late in the French Classic Positif, in which the 4' member of=20 both the chorus and the cornet was the Prestant.=20 The Cornet "Separ=E9" or Cornet de R=E9cit is most frequently found, not= =20 alarmingly, on the R=E9cit. The Cornet d'Echo appears on occasion, in the=20 breast of the instrument, behind the music desk, within the corpus of the=20 case. The mounted Grand Cornet V, with its 8' pitch usually being a chimney=20 flute of some kind, most often begins at middle C on the Grand-Orgue,=20 reinforcing the Trompette and Clairon, welding them together in the treble a= s=20 the Grand-Jeu. In solo, it is voiced to do battle with the 8' Cromorne on=20 the Positif, "en dialogue." Alfred Kern told me many years ago that the=20 Cromorne could have parity of amplitude with the Trompette du Grand-Orgue.=20 Cromornes were of significantly larger scale than most Americans are willing= =20 to build, and frequently had little or minor scale change in resonator=20 diameter as they ascended the compass. It remains an ongoing practice amongst American organbuilders to place=20 the only tierce combination on the same manual as the cylindrical half-lengt= h=20 reed, essentially preventing the authentic performance of the dialogue. =20 Likewise, it is thought "clever" by some to unify the Nasard, making it=20 availabe as an "orphaned" Larigot on an opposing manual, "for use in trio=20 sonatas." My sense is that very little study has been done regarding the=20 small organs of the northern Baroque; the little practice organs of the last= =20 half-century are academic constructs of their own nature, but may have littl= e=20 to do with the small organs of the past, or those for which trio sonatas wer= e=20 written.   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: American pipe organs in Asia From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 15:05:06 +1200   And there is a 19th century Willis (England) tracker in Thailand that has been maintained in good order. Ross -----Original Message----- From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@mindspring.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, May 23, 2002 2:01 PM Subject: Re: American pipe organs in Asia     >----- Original Message ----- >From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> >To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 6:41 PM >Subject: American pipe organs in Asia > > >> American pipe organs have been exported to Asia for over a century. >While >> once primarily the realm of factory builders producing electropneumatic >(and >> electric-action) instruments, the trend in recent decades has been = toward >the >> keen interest in mechanical action instruments based upon historical >models. > >As a historical footnote to this, however, it may be noted that Ernest M. >Skinner exported one of the only two tracker organs his firm ever built = to >Japan (The other went to the Edison Laboratory at the Henry Ford Museum = to >replace a Roosevelt tracker destroyed by fire.) > >John Speller > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 22:03:28 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 10:03 PM Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists     > Tell me more about this H&H opinion of their own work at the RFH. > What is H&H's opinion, for example, of their Coventry Cathedral organ? I > found it not even beginning to measure up in quality to the Southwark > Cathedral Lewis that H&H themselves did up so superlatively well. > We have a very large 3-m&P H&H in Auckland Cathedral here in NZ from the > early 1960s, with 2 32fts, en chamades, etc., but I've never liked the tone. > The organ is large, powerful, but not beautiful or charming in any = sense. > Too, the design has many grave faults. > Ross   I couldn't begin to say what Harrison & Harrison would say of it as their own work, but so far as Coventry Cathedral is concerned I would personally say I think it was one of the outstanding instruments from a rather bleak period in English organbuilding. There are two factors which have = militated against it receiving the credit due to it. First, it is an almost impossible instrument to record well, so recordings do not on the whole = give a very good impression of it. Secondly, an organist seated at the console receives a very poor impression of what the instrument sounds like in the building, and it is therefore difficult for a person unfamiliar with the instrument to gauge how to use it to its best advantage. The Harrison instruments at St. Alban's Cathedral and St. George's Chapel, Windsor are also among the outstanding instruments from the early 1960's, as also is = the slightly earlier instrument in the Colston Hall, Bristol. All of these instruments would, I think, stand up extremely well in comparison with the instruments of other builders produced in all parts of the world at the time.   The Lewis organ in Southwark Cathedral is certainly one of the outstanding instruments from almost any period, and I do not think many other instruments anywhere would come off well in comparison with it.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: American pipe organs in Asia From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 22 May 2002 22:14:47 -0500   The Willis in the Episcopal Church in Bangkok, Thailand, is a rare example of a Henry Willis II instrument dating from 1905. It was the first -- and = I believe it still is the only -- pipe organ in Thailand. When it was imported into Thailand the church had the greatest difficulty in = persuading the customs officials to allow the instrument in. The Thai officials had = no idea what a pipe organ was and thought it might be some new form of = British secret weapon. This was perhaps not an unreasonable worry. After all = those long metal things do look a bit like extra long shell cases!   John Speller ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 10:05 PM Subject: Re: American pipe organs in Asia     > And there is a 19th century Willis (England) tracker in Thailand that = has > been maintained in good order.