PipeChat Digest #2867 - Thursday, May 23, 2002
 
Re: organbuilders as creative artists
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: American pipe organs in Asia
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 17:29:27 +1200   Thanks, John. I spent an hour at Southwark one day, then two hours at Coventry the following, then an hour back at Southwark again the next day. On all three days, I was able to wander all around the building and hear the organ in perspective in the building. My trouble with Coventry is that it shouts in the treble, booms in the = bass, and lacks a warm tummy when played mf to fff. Ross -----Original Message----- From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@mindspring.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, May 23, 2002 3:08 PM Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists     > >----- Original Message ----- >From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> >To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 10:03 PM >Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists > > >> Tell me more about this H&H opinion of their own work at the RFH. >> What is H&H's opinion, for example, of their Coventry Cathedral organ? = I >> found it not even beginning to measure up in quality to the Southwark >> Cathedral Lewis that H&H themselves did up so superlatively well. >> We have a very large 3-m&P H&H in Auckland Cathedral here in NZ from = the >> early 1960s, with 2 32fts, en chamades, etc., but I've never liked the >tone. >> The organ is large, powerful, but not beautiful or charming in any = sense. >> Too, the design has many grave faults. >> Ross > >I couldn't begin to say what Harrison & Harrison would say of it as their >own work, but so far as Coventry Cathedral is concerned I would = personally >say I think it was one of the outstanding instruments from a rather bleak >period in English organbuilding. There are two factors which have militated >against it receiving the credit due to it. First, it is an almost >impossible instrument to record well, so recordings do not on the whole give >a very good impression of it. Secondly, an organist seated at the = console >receives a very poor impression of what the instrument sounds like in the >building, and it is therefore difficult for a person unfamiliar with the >instrument to gauge how to use it to its best advantage. The Harrison >instruments at St. Alban's Cathedral and St. George's Chapel, Windsor are >also among the outstanding instruments from the early 1960's, as also is the >slightly earlier instrument in the Colston Hall, Bristol. All of these >instruments would, I think, stand up extremely well in comparison with = the >instruments of other builders produced in all parts of the world at the >time. > >The Lewis organ in Southwark Cathedral is certainly one of the = outstanding >instruments from almost any period, and I do not think many other >instruments anywhere would come off well in comparison with it. > >John Speller > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: American pipe organs in Asia From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 17:31:12 +1200   I have a vinyl recording of this organ, with choir, "Nine Lessons and Carols" no less. I thought it was earlier than that, but may well be = wrong. I'm sure it's tracker, though. Ross -----Original Message----- From: John L. Speller <jlspeller@mindspring.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, May 23, 2002 3:19 PM Subject: Re: American pipe organs in Asia     >The Willis in the Episcopal Church in Bangkok, Thailand, is a rare = example >of a Henry Willis II instrument dating from 1905. It was the first -- = and I >believe it still is the only -- pipe organ in Thailand. When it was >imported into Thailand the church had the greatest difficulty in = persuading >the customs officials to allow the instrument in. The Thai officials had no >idea what a pipe organ was and thought it might be some new form of = British >secret weapon. This was perhaps not an unreasonable worry. After all those >long metal things do look a bit like extra long shell cases! > >John Speller >----- Original Message ----- >From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> >To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 10:05 PM >Subject: Re: American pipe organs in Asia > > >> And there is a 19th century Willis (England) tracker in Thailand that = has >> been maintained in good order. > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >