PipeChat Digest #2868 - Thursday, May 23, 2002
 
RE: organbuilders as creative artists
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
RE: Reduced to Tierce
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: organbuilders as creative artists
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Reduced to Tierce
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: organbuilders as creative artists
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Organist Anedote
  by "Rev. Ed" <edwardorgan@hotmail.com>
Re: organbuilders as creative artists(Experiments)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
report on the Synod Mass and Ordinations (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
William Albright CD, Douglas Reed Plays
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Alan Laufman Memorialized on CD
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2866 - 05/22/02
  by "Ken_Earl01" <ken_earl01@hotmail.com>
Re: Organist Anedote
  by "Dennis" <hcbaroque@yahoo.com>
Burial Office for Sally Ann Clark, 1956-2002 (no relation) (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: organbuilders as creative artists
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
MIDI help
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: organbuilders as creative artists From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 10:17:41 +0100     Hello,   The H&H organ at Coventry Cathedral is an interesting "half way house" = in the history of the company. Originally conceived as a four manual = "Opens 1 to 4 with Trombas and Tubas", the organ committee moved the = design into the contemporary age to some degree. It is far from being a = poor instrument.....many top recitalists have recorded on it, including = Wayne Marshall and Jane Parker-Smith, but it lacks a certain = individuality. Beautifully made, it performs it prime function as an = accompaniment instrument superbly and, at the same time, is tonally = classical ENOUGH to be a capable solo instrument. If anything, it is = just a little too conservative. However, compared to other H & H = instruments found in English cathedrals, it was quite "futuristic" back = in 1964. Above all, it had to be an "Anglican" instrument rather than an = experiment or a concert hall organ.   It is interesting that many at H & H felt somehow "ashamed" of the RFH = instrument. That is sad, because they achieved a far better instrument = than Flentrop managed at "De Doelen" in Rotterdam. It's a great pity that the RFH couldn't be pulled down and a half-decent = hall erected to replace it. Only then would the quality of H & H's work = and the Ralph Downes concept truly emerge. Make no mistake, the RFH = organ is magnificent, but like those lovely Wurlitzers that people stuff = into garages and lean-to's, the effect in the room is fairly awful.   Compare this to the Denys Thulrow voiced organ of Blackburn Cathedral by = J W Walker........my favourite UK instrument. Thurlow was greatly = influenced by Ralph Downes, just as the H & H were at the Festival Hall. = At Blackburn, the then organist Dr John Bertalot and Dr Francis Jackson = conceived a highly classical tonal conception; aided and abetted by the = availibility of some magnificent ruined Cavaille-Coll tin pipes which = could be (shudder!!) melted down. (Denys Thulrow felt very strange when = the first pipes went into the pot!). The chorus work is = outstanding.....glittering, clear as a bell in a huge acoustic = and....well....simply superb. The real point of departure is in the reed = voicing....at Blackburn, there is unasahmed use of French reed tone, = thus producing one of the most exciting organs to be found anywhere. In = fact, Blackburn created in (I think) 1968 a perfect example of a new = type of British Organ......German chorus work with French chorus reeds.   The two instruments make fascinating comparison, but having accompanied = at Blackburn, I know that it is quite difficult to do. Coventry is at = its best as an accompaniment instrument.=20   There you have the difference in a nutshell.=20   H & H were in very transitional phase when Coventry was built. However, = they made the transition wonderfully at this time, and anyone who doubts = their abilities during this era might do well to go and hear the = re-built instrument at St.George's Chapel,Windsor. With some very = unpromising material, they virtually created a new instrument.....this = time following the new trend established at Blackburn. French Swell, = English/German Great, German Positiv and an English enclosed Choir organ = sharing the same manual and a traditional Solo division with some fiery = reeds with French Shallots.   Now people go on about the restoration at Southwark (an awesome = instrument by T C Lewis), but for the best authentic H & H sound, = Windsor is just "stunning"......and what's more, it is a wonderful = accompaniment instrument at the same time.   Finally, a "story" concerning Coventry! =20   When the organ committee sat to discuss the new instrument at Coventry, = Cuthbert Harrison was invited to attend. He drove all the way from = Durham and reached the outskirts of the city. Like me, he was soon "lost = in space" and drew up to ask for directions. He stopped at a Bus Stop, = wound the window down, but before he could speak, the person at the Bus = Stop opened the door, jumped in the car and said, "I presume you want to = know where the cathedral is Mr Harrison!!" =20   Cuthbert Harison had somehow managed to draw up alongside a committee = member on his way to the meeting.   Stranger than fiction!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       -----Original Message----- From: "pipechat@pipechat.org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> on behalf of "Ross = & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Sent: 23 May 2002 03:03 To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists   Tell me more about this H&H opinion of their own work at the RFH. What is H&H's opinion, for example, of their Coventry Cathedral organ?  
(back) Subject: RE: Reduced to Tierce From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 10:28:15 +0100     Hello,   What a simply wonderful idea....a Larigot in a vacuum!   Would it be re-named "Laryngitis"?   Regards, Colin Mitchell UK     -----Original Message----"TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com>   Sebastian wrote:-     Just a note to clarify what I have said, the past, regarding the = Larigot: I did not say that the Larigot belongs on the Choir, but rather that = the=20 Larigot does not exist in a vacuum.  
(back) Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 23:01:36 +1200   I have not heard the Blackburn Cathedral instrument, but it sounds really wonderful. Do you have the specification for us?   Thanks for all your comments, helping fill in some gaps. To be honest, I still think H&H could have done better at Coventry as they had recently = also built new the organ in Auckland Cathedral here. That is also large, but relatively colourless. You go away thinking, "Impressive, but so what?" = Some years after it was completed, I had to spend time convincing the organist = of the time (Tony Jennings) that some dozen or more of the big pipes from the 32ft Salicional and 16ft Pedal Principal weren't speaking at all. I = finally convinced Tony and H&H were ordered under the guarantee to come back to NZ at their own expense and make the darned things speak. They did.   I'm not having a shot at H&H, believe me, as they have a = totally-justifiable reputation for sterling work, with little opposition in cathedral-size buildings, it seems, though I know what the exceptions are.   Not having had a chance to play the Beverley Minster organ, could you tell me what this sounds like? And is the organ in York Minster better since local builder Coffin rebuilt it in the early 1990s? Too, I saw and touched the organ in St Giles's Edinburgh but the organist was away and the = Minister could not find a key for me. Is it good?   Thanks again, Ross     <The H&H organ at Coventry Cathedral is an interesting "half way house" in the history of the company. Originally conceived as a four manual "Opens 1 to 4 with Trombas and Tubas", the organ committee moved the design into = the contemporary age to some degree. It is far from being a poor instrument.....many top recitalists have recorded on it, including Wayne Marshall and Jane Parker-Smith, but it lacks a certain individuality. Beautifully made, it performs it prime function as an accompaniment instrument superbly and, at the same time, is tonally classical ENOUGH to = be a capable solo instrument. If anything, it is just a little too conservative. However, compared to other H & H instruments found in = English cathedrals, it was quite "futuristic" back in 1964. Above all, it had to = be an "Anglican" instrument rather than an experiment or a concert hall = organ.          
(back) Subject: Re: Reduced to Tierce From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 23:02:27 +1200   No, indeed no. It would be called, "Larry-went." Ross -----Original Message----- From: cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, May 23, 2002 9:27 PM Subject: RE: Reduced to Tierce       Hello,   What a simply wonderful idea....a Larigot in a vacuum!   Would it be re-named "Laryngitis"?   Regards, Colin Mitchell UK     -----Original Message----"TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com>   Sebastian wrote:-     Just a note to clarify what I have said, the past, regarding the Larigot: I did not say that the Larigot belongs on the Choir, but rather that = the Larigot does not exist in a vacuum.   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 11:35:39 +0000     Dear members, I must spring to the defense of the Royal Festival Hall organ. In my opinion, very few people could play it well. Most of the recitals there in =   the 50's and 60's were given by well known International Recitalists, yet few of them sparked off any excitement with the audience. The building has =   not got organ-sympathetic acoustics, but it is a fine instrument and my association with the people who built it were that in their opinion, = though different, it was - and is - one of their best. It did not appeal to those =   brought up on W.T.Best, Hollins or Lemare - much though I personally like the claptrap they have written! Listen to Thomas Murray's superbly musical =   performance of "song of sunshine" from the Cube organ. Ralph Downes = himself was more of an academic than a recitalist - since I usually turned pages = for him in his RFH recitals from 1961 to 1970 I cannot take an objective view = of how they came over to the audience. You don't get bored turning pages! I preferred the organ in Brompton Oratory, particularly up in the gallery. = As a reward for hard work he would give me occasional lessons there instead = of room 90 at the RCM. However, I enjoyed playing the RFH organ. From the platform it is an exciting sound, and a good player could make it sing, to =   witness Simon Preston, George Thalben Ball and Melville Cook to mention = but three. Continental players didn't like it very much - again the lack of resonance they were used to in their own venues, and of course it has Electro Pneumatic rather than tracker action. I think the decline in = recital giving there was primarily Nick Danby's fault - he had some rather = mediocre players in the series on a "I'll give you a recital date if you give me = one" basis. I believe that things are looking up again. But no snide remarks please. British organ building needed a push and the RFH gave it. John Foss   _________________________________________________________________ MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos: http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx    
(back) Subject: Organist Anedote From: "Rev. Ed" <edwardorgan@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 14:55:07 +0000     Friends, If you've heard this one, let it be your chuckle for the day. Rev. E.D.       Miss Bea, the church organist, was in her eighties and had never been married. She was much admired for her sweetness and kindness to all. The pastor came to call on her one afternoon early in the spring, and she welcomed him into her Victorian parlor. She invited him to have a seat = while she parepared a little tea. As he sat facting her old pump organ, the = young minister noticed a cut glass bowl sitting on topf of it, filled with = water. In the water floated, of all things, a condom. Imagin his shcock and surprise. Imagine his curiosity! surely Miss Bea had flipped or something...! When she returned with the tea and cookies, they began to chat. The pastor tried to stifle his curiosity about the bowl of water and =   its floater, but soon it got the better of him and he couldn resist no longer. "Miss Bea! ,"! he said, "I wonder if you would tell me about = this?" (pointing to the bowl). "Oh yes," she replied, "isn't it wonderful? I was walking downtown last = fall and I found this little package lying on the ground. The directions said = to put it on the orngan, keep it wet, and it would prevent disease. And you know... I haven't had a cold all winter."     _________________________________________________________________ Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists(Experiments) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 11:19:12 EDT   Dear Listers:   There is one practice of creativity used by organ builders of the last century that I can understand on small instruments. Late 19th and early 20th Century instruments used groving and a common Bass for some stops which were partial ranks.   I just don't see why short cuts, or cutting corners on large instruments was such a good idea during the 70's and 80's. One builder used to rob basses from other ranks sort of like this. A complete 16' Principal was provided for the pedal. The Great Principal 8' was 49 pipes TC and the tenor Octave of the Pedal rank yielded the missing 12 pipes. The great 4' Octave also began life at TC 49 pipes and the tenor octave robbed from the 8' Principal. A 2' super Octave also began life at TC 49 pipes and the 12 notes supplied by the 4' rank. Some might say that was un noticeable and a good use of related material. The only problem was there were holes in the structure and the organs sounded treble heavy and without sufficient middle or bottom. Some builders actually did the same thing with flute ranks also to hide the unification. The saving, 36 pipes of a single 8' rank whether Principal or flute. In the Principal chorus the Quint was eliminated, and high pitched mixtures breaking nearly every octave. An organ of nearly 60 ranks, IMHO should never be treated this way. This was one of the excesses of the period, and I do hope a good deal of rethinking has gone on since.   During the same period Schwimmers were substituted for reservoirs on several well known organs using small high speed blowers. The toes of the pipes were too thin with open toe techniques, causing some pipes to drop languids, and the toes crushed because of the weight. All this on rather sizeable instruments of 60 to 80 ranks or more. I hope the practice has been discontinued, as these organs as a result, have a much shorter life span, and major repairs needed as a result of the corners cut. These are experiments gone wild.   The other glaring problem for churches is that usually only one swell box was provided on a three manual organ or a four. Strange stop lists with a Swell for instance with no Principal rank at all, and a borrowed string at 8' 4' to suffice, but also a mixture IV-V included. Tuning problems also abound in a scheme like this, and cone tuning with temperature variations of 40 degrees can cause crushing and splitting of pipes, or the pipes go untuned. Tuning collars in this case would have served better. I'm looking into an example right now, and the prognosis is very grim. The organ hasn't been regularly maintained, be- cause of the aforementioned difficulties. To straighten things out and make them right will cost a lot of other people's money. I'm sure good organ builders today wouldn't think of foisting such experiments on churches today and I hope we have learned a very valueable lesson from all this. Comments Please!   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: report on the Synod Mass and Ordinations (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 09:24:56 -0700   The church was standing-room-only ... it's ALREADY too small, but we knew it was going to be.   The acoustics are SUPERB ... 2 1/2 - 3 seconds reverb when it's FULL ... the congregational singing is this great WALL of sound that ALL but drowns out the mighty Allen, which, given what it is, doesn't sound BAD in the space.   The incense wasn't overpowering, though most of it seemed to end up in the choir loft ... we DID have to open the upstairs doors and turn on the fans (grin). But we CAN, so that's fine. There's good air circulation in the loft with the doors to the outside stairways open and the fans running.   Everything, sung and spoken, seemed to naturally slow down to the tempo required by such a live room. It was good to hear a big congregation really SING Missa Marialis again ... and they followed the directions for antiphonal singing of the Kyrie PERFECTLY.   The choir sounds UNBELIEVABLY good ... the acoustical consultant specified funnel-shaped side walls in the loft to project the sound, and they REALLY *work*.   But the BIG thing is the congregational participation, both sung and spoken. 11:00 Mass on Sunday was comfortably full, but not to overflowing, and they SANG. I've never HEARD them sing before (grin).   The music was the same as on Pentecost, with different Propers and a couple of different hymns. They sang "Veni Creator" to St. Patrick's Breastplate for the processional again ... what a SOUND! The ordinands had requested "Let All Mortal Flesh" and "Jerusalem, My Happy Home" ... I thought the ROOF was going to come off by the time we got to the last verse of "Let All Mortal Flesh" ...   Well, I have to get on the road ... we have our first FUNERAL this morning, as if the choir wasn't tired ENOUGH ... but they were thrilled at how the Burial Office sounded when we ran through it Monday night.   The acoustics were DEFINITELY worth the fight ...   Cheers,   Bud  
(back) Subject: William Albright CD, Douglas Reed Plays From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 12:47:39 -0400   Douglas Reed plays organ works of William Albright in a set of 2-CDs = issued as a memorial to the American composer. Reed plays the C. B. Fisk op. 110 located in Yokohama, Japan, in Minato Mirai Hall. Michael Barone narrates the hilarious and educational "The King of Instruments." The work appears twice on the set, the second time with narration in Japanese language = spoken by a female voice. Other works on the 2-CD set include Carillon-Bombarde; Sweeth Sixteenths, Nun komm der Heiden Heiland, Hymn, and Organ Book III = (12 works). The recording is available from the OHS Catalog http://www.ohscatalog.org    
(back) Subject: Alan Laufman Memorialized on CD From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 14:52:05 -0400   At Holy Cross Church in Santa Cruz, California, Alan Laufman's Organ Clearing House relocated an A. B. Felgemaker organ built in 1889 for Fifth Presbyterian Church of Columbus, Ohio. D. Steuart Goodwin rebuilt and enlarged the organ with fine results that were heard first at the 1988 OHS National Convention. The church produced this new CD in memory of Alan Laufman (1935-2000), and it features performers Alexei Parshin, professor = of organ at the Moscow Conservatory, and his former student Vlada = Volkova-Moran who is now music director and organist of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church in Ben Lomond, California. Alan would surely be pleased with this testament = to a great Organ Clearing House success, demonstrated by no less than an international cast of stellar performers, all brought together by Sister Barbara Ann Long, organist of the church and instigator of the Organ Clearing House project in 1983. BACH: Prelude, Largo & Fugue in C, BWV 545 BACH: Prelude & Fugue in E-flat, BWV 552 BACH Chorales: Vater unser, Wenn wir in H=F6hsten N=F6ten sein, Heut' triumphiret Gottes Sohn, FRANCK: Prelude, Fugue & Variation DANDRIEU: Basse et Dessus de Trompette, R=E9cit de Trompette separ=E9e ou = de Cromorne (Magnificat 3rd Tone) CORRETTE: Tambourin (Magnificat 5th Tone); Carillon (Nouveau livre de = No=EBls) WIDOR: Allegro cantabile and Toccata from Symphony No. 5        
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2866 - 05/22/02 From: "Ken_Earl01" <ken_earl01@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 21:08:47 +0100   Someone wrote>>The Harrison instruments at St. Alban's Cathedral and St. George's Chapel, Windsor are also among the outstanding instruments from the early 1960's, as also is = the slightly earlier instrument in the Colston Hall, Bristol. All of these<<   Get it right - these instruments were:-   St Alban's Cathedral - 1835 Bevington, 1861,1871, 1877, and 1881 Wm Hill,1885 Abbott, 1906/8 Abbott & Smith, 1921 Tunks & Son, 1929 Henry Willis & Sons completely rebuilt and remodelled.   St George's Chapel - 1885 Gray & Davidson, rebuilt J W Walker 1930.   Colston Hall - HNB completely rebuilt and remodelled by Willis in 1936   Harrison and Harrison can usually do a good job of rebuilding another builder's work. Their own modern large instruments usually tend to = scream, although with a few notable exceptions.     Ken  
(back) Subject: Re: Organist Anedote From: "Dennis" <hcbaroque@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 13:54:09 -0700 (PDT)   Rev,   Hardy har har...<gr>....the naivity is definitely funny.   Dennis   --- "Rev. Ed" <edwardorgan@hotmail.com> wrote: > > Friends, > If you've heard this one, let it be your chuckle for the day. > Rev. E.D. > > > > Miss Bea, the church organist, was in her eighties and had never been > married. She was much admired for her sweetness and kindness to all. The > > pastor came to call on her one afternoon early in the spring, and she > welcomed him into her Victorian parlor. She invited him to have a seat > while > she parepared a little tea. As he sat facting her old pump organ, the > young > minister noticed a cut glass bowl sitting on topf of it, filled with > water. > In the water floated, of all things, a condom. Imagin his shcock and > surprise. Imagine his curiosity! surely Miss Bea had flipped or > something...! When she returned with the tea and cookies, they began to > chat. The pastor tried to stifle his curiosity about the bowl of water > and > its floater, but soon it got the better of him and he couldn resist no > longer. "Miss Bea! ,"! he said, "I wonder if you would tell me about > this?" > (pointing to the bowl). > "Oh yes," she replied, "isn't it wonderful? I was walking downtown last > fall > and I found this little package lying on the ground. The directions said > to > put it on the orngan, keep it wet, and it would prevent disease. And you > > know... I haven't had a cold all winter." > > > _________________________________________________________________ > Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? LAUNCH - Your Yahoo! Music Experience http://launch.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Burial Office for Sally Ann Clark, 1956-2002 (no relation) (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 15:54:58 -0700   St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church 2300 Ford Road Newport Beach CA   The Rev'd Stephen C. Scarlett, Officiating The Rev'd Richard L. Stapp, Assisting Members of the Parish Choir R.H. ("Bud") Clark, Organist/Choirmaster     Voluntaries Sheep May Safely Graze - Bach Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring - Bach Solo - Justorum animae - Griesbacher - Lisa Marion, soprano The Sentences (1) I Am The Resurrection and the Life - Stainer/Merbecke Psalm 23 - Anglican Chant - Russell in F - congregation and choir (family's request) Psalm 27 - Anglican Chant - Barnby in E Flat - congregation and choir Reading from 1st Thessalonians - from the Requiem Mass But I would not have you to be ignorant, brethren ... Hymn - The Strife is O'er - Victory Reading from St. John's Gospel In my Father's house are many mansions ... Anthem - I Heard A Voice From Heaven - Stainer/Merbecke Sermon Hymn - Fairest Lord Jesus - St. Elizabeth The Apostles' Creed The Lord's Prayer Prayers The Aaronic Blessing Orison - Day By Day - Sumner Hymn - Blest Be The Tie That Binds - Dennis The Sentences (sung as the procession retired) (2) Man That Is Born Of A Woman - Stainer/Merbecke (3) All That The Father Giveth Me - Clark (1) I Am The Resurrection and the Life - Stainer/Merbecke (repeated)     Poor choir! They were EXHAUSTED, but they sounded fine.   Church was packed. The congregation SANG, even the Psalms, which we print with pointing in the funeral booklets.   We follow the Orthodox rubric: "if you need more music, repeat something the choir has sung well" (grin) ... so we repeat the first Sentences, rather than me playing a closing voluntary. They haven't QUITE got the Contakion learned yet.   I'm going to BED ...   Cheers,   Bud  
(back) Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 19:30:31 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2002 6:01 AM Subject: Re: organbuilders as creative artists     >the organ in Auckland Cathedral here. <snip> Some > years after it was completed, I had to spend time convincing the = organist of > the time (Tony Jennings) that some dozen or more of the big pipes from = the > 32ft Salicional and 16ft Pedal Principal weren't speaking at all.   This sounds like the usual "electrolytic zinc" problem that afflicted many of the organs built by just about every organbuilder of the 1960's and = still afflicts the instruments of some builders today. The problem is that as technology progressed, zinc got to be purer and purer, with the result = that it got too soft to use in large pipes. The premature sagging of languids = is a common result of this, and often renders the large pipes speechless in = the sort of way you describe what happened in New Zealand. Once organbuilders got wise to this problem they took more care over their sources of zinc, = but finding good zinc is becoming more and more difficult with every passing year, and short of opening their own zinc smelting plants there isn't a = lot organbuilders can do about this. The same problem has also made other metals like tin and lead softer too.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: MIDI help From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Thu, 23 May 2002 20:53:04 -0400   Fellow list members:   Anyone on the list in the Baltimore/Washington DC area who is familiar = with the use of the Peterson MIDI Controller System for pipe organ consoles, please contact me privately if you are willing to give me tuition (at a suitable reimbursement) in using the same. The manuals which came with = the equipment might as well be written in ancient Sanskrit for all the sense they make to me.   What I am attempting to do is connect a Roland portable organ to the pipe organ console to supply some of the upperwork which the pipe organ lacks.   Thank, in advance, for any and all feedback.   Dave Barton