PipeChat Digest #2875 - Wednesday, May 29, 2002
 
Re:Consider my cat Jeffrey
  by <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Re: Bridal Fanfare
  by "Bruce  Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
RE: A voice in church this morning
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Bridal Fanfare
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
The rest of the known world
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: The rest of the known world
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
RE: The rest of the known world
  by "Savage, Boyd" <bsavage@fredlaw.com>
Re: A voice in church this morning
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Bridal Fanfare
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Most Unusual Pipe
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Correction
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Buzard facade
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Buzard facade
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
RE: Not so Unusual Pipe
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
"Embossed" Facade Pipes
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Off topic....
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
Peterson Play BAck System
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Faceted pipes (was:Buzard facade)
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Faceted pipes (was:Buzard facade)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: MEMBERSHIP & RESEARCH
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Off topic....
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re:Consider my cat Jeffrey
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re:Consider my cat Jeffrey From: <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 14:08:49 -0300 (BRT)   Hi, John   This organ you are playing on the photo is a Johannus? I have one Johannus/Sweelinck 10 in my house. It's look like the organ of the photo. Congratulations to Jeffrey.   Domitila   >>Dear Members, >I have christened my cat Jeffrey as a tribute to the list. You can see = him >on my Yahoo groups photo page, strategically placed to give his first >recital. The page also includes a picture of the Weigel organ case and >console in the Evangelical Church in Katerini and one or two other = pictures >of my students. >John Foss > >http://uk.photos.yahoo.com/bc/harfo32/lst?&.dir=3D/JOHN+FOSS+-+THE+ORGANS&= .src=3Dph&.view=3Dt > > > >_________________________________________________________________ >MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos: >http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >   --- Use o melhor sistema de busca da Internet Radar UOL - http://radaruol.uol.com.br  
(back) Subject: Re: Bridal Fanfare From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 18:46:26 +0100   Noel Rawsthorne's 'Fanfair for a Bride' takes some beating. It's 32 bars = but the first 14 stand well on their own.. In 'Music for the Bride' album (Mayhew) - I'm pretty sure it's still in print.   Bruce Miles     mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Joshua Edwards" <fbcorganist@charter.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 2:15 PM Subject: Bridal Fanfare     Does anyone know of a printed fanfare (10-20 measures) announcing the bride's entrance? I just hate playing the little octave diddy before the Wagner. I know Dan Miller wrote his own and uses it on his "Power and the Glory" CD. If any one has written it down, I sure would like a copy. Or, if you have any more suggestions, that would be great too!   Thanks,   Josh        
(back) Subject: RE: A voice in church this morning From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 14:02:38 -0400   >> [speaking to an organ tuner] the organist. . . >> with a condescending attitude, added, >> "I always think it such a pity that people like you (he meant >> "workmen") who have such a good musical ear couldn't have really used >> it and made something of themselves.   >What a complete horse's ASS!   >I would never work for such a person again.   Amen in this case, although at first I didn't know to whom he was = speaking. If he were responding to some ignoramus in the congregation who presumed = to advise him how to play, the remark might be quite fitting.   Anyway, the tuner's income probably exceeds the organist's-- but not by so much that one could suspect that he didn't *earn* every penny of it. In = my foolish youth, I used to think nothing of scrambling all around an organ chamber, but the older I get the more hesitant I become, mindful of my own ignorance and of the damage that the slightest mis-step could do. Someone in this line of work (actually, more than a tuner: a fine all-around technician and builder of some repute) once said that he was thinking of giving it all up and becoming a plumber: the pay would be better and the working conditions no worse.   So is the tuner failing to "make something of himself?" No more than the teacher awhile back who discovered that his district's custodians were = paid more than the teachers. The next year he showed up in the same school, as the janitor.      
(back) Subject: RE: Bridal Fanfare From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 14:26:38 -0400   Josh asks:   >Does anyone know of a printed fanfare (10-20 measures) announcing the bride's entrance? I just hate playing the little octave diddy before the Wagner.   Novello publishes, or published, a little book of fanfares by Sir Arthur Bliss, whose reputation was (inscrutably, if these pieces are any indication) such that he composed music for at least one royal wedding. Some of these are just one page long. I have played for a couple weddings at which one or another was requested.   The cachet of a royal event must be what commends the music to some = couples. It certainly isn't the music itself, which IMHO is disappointingly lackluster and pedestrian, at least as transcribed for organ. (And does = its originally being for brass ensemble or full orchestra make it better or worse? I'd be inclined to say worse: it goes from wasting the time of a soloist to that of a whole ensemble, and just to add bombast.) But if the only alternative to the bland is the hideous, it's a no-brainer.   > Does anyone know of a printed fanfare (10-20 measures) announcing the > bride's entrance? I just hate playing the little octave diddy before = the > Wagner. I know Dan Miller wrote his own and uses it on his "Power and = the > Glory" CD. If any one has written it down, I sure would like a copy. = Or, > if you have any more suggestions, that would be great too! > > Thanks, > > Josh >  
(back) Subject: The rest of the known world From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 19:53:53 +0100   Hello,   I was just musing away this morning (as one does whilst stroking the = cat) and it suddenly struck me that when organists in Europe and America = talk "organ", we are almost always restricting ourselves to the = "mainstream" of the German/French/English/American tradition.   Nevertheless, there ARE very different instruments in Spain, in Italy = and in Eastern Europe....so what do we know about them?   For starters, what do members know of the great organs at Toledo, = Granada etc etc?   And what about the very large organ of Milan Cathedral?   WE NEED TO KNOW!! (Well I do anyway)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK            
(back) Subject: Re: The rest of the known world From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 21:08:45 +0200     From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 8:53 PM     > For starters, what do members know of the great organs at Toledo, = Granada etc etc?   > And what about the very large organ of Milan Cathedral?   and the large Ruffattis in Monreale and Fatima or the poor Mascioni in Messina?      
(back) Subject: RE: The rest of the known world From: "Savage, Boyd" <bsavage@fredlaw.com> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 14:18:40 -0500   >For starters, what do members know of the great organs at Toledo, Granada etc etc?<   I know that Poul-Gerhard Anderson's book "Organ Building and Design" talks about these organs at least a little, in Chapter 8 (The Organ Facade) and pages 156-169 of Chapter 7 (The West European Organ Types) are devoted to Spanish instruments.   Boyd        
(back) Subject: Re: A voice in church this morning From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 17:49:27 -0400   > So is the tuner failing to "make something of himself?" No more than = the > teacher awhile back who discovered that his district's custodians were = paid > more than the teachers. The next year he showed up in the same school, = as > the janitor. > Obviously with a profound commitment to his calling.   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: Bridal Fanfare From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 18:00:53 -0500   I agree with Bud - we seldom use the Wagner, but in one of my old piano anthologies was a transcription with a short introduction from the opera itself, which I used prior to the familiar part. Perhaps you could find and use that! If you can't find it, reply privately and I'll see what I can do.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Most Unusual Pipe From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 19:38:00 -0400   Greetings on this fine day, It is a fine day always when my Diapason copy arrives. The cover photos are always fantastic and I voraciously consume the content even though I should be working. It is a tradition at the shop, that I will be of no use for a solid half an hour after my Diapason arrives. :-) The cover photo on the June issue shows the facade of a new Buzzard Organ, and smack in the middle is the most unusual looking pipe I have ever seen. It looks faceted like a jewel and is replete with a normal looking mouth with ears. I wonder if this pipe speaks, or is simply decorative? It is surrounded by normal smooth metal pipes that look authentic enough. The finish on all the facade pipes is a highly polished brass tone, and they look spectacular. I wonder what they are made of and how the finish id attained. For those who do not receive the Diapason, the organ is located at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Denver. It is far from complete at this point with 14 stops 17 ranks. It will be 27 stops 32 ranks when all the preparations are eventually filled in. It has none of its reeds yet at all, and the entire Antiphonal Division is only prepared for at this point. The specification for this organ as well as some pictures showing the unusual pipe I mentioned above can be seen at: http://www.buzardorgans.com/opus/opus26-list.html. The best picture of the facade is on the their home page at: http://www.buzardorgans.com/   Cheers Mike    
(back) Subject: Correction From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 19:41:12 -0400   I realized after I pushed the send button on my last post, the organ company is spelled Buzard with only one "z". Sorry for the mistake.   Mike    
(back) Subject: Buzard facade From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 16:53:20 -0700   Mike, that's a hammered or faceted pipe, and I'm sure that it DOES speak.   As I recall, John Brombaugh was one of the first modern American builders to revive the practice.   I HAVEN'T ever heard anybody say whether or not it has any noticeable effect on the SOUND of the pipe.   Cheers,   Bud  
(back) Subject: Re: Buzard facade From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 19:08:20 -0500   definitely not hammered, bud! The facets are made by scribing the pipe metal on the side which will be inside the pipe when it rolled up Very Carefully. The process was revived by various European pipe makers some years ago. Roy Redman   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > Mike, that's a hammered or faceted pipe, and I'm sure that it DOES > speak. > > As I recall, John Brombaugh was one of the first modern American > builders to revive the practice. > > I HAVEN'T ever heard anybody say whether or not it has any noticeable > effect on the SOUND of the pipe. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: Not so Unusual Pipe From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 01:57:10 +0100   Hello,   I would have to check this out, but I have seen organ facades on new = organs in the UK with faceted pipes. I think the company was Lamermuir = and, if my memory isn't playing too many tricks, Henry T Brugencate also = included this style of very beautiful looking pipes.   I will have to check back copies of the Organist's Review.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK        
(back) Subject: "Embossed" Facade Pipes From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 21:32:26 EDT   This is an ancient practice, and has been used in American organs in = the past three or four decades. When the pipe metal is in "flats," it is scored on what will become = the inside face; these scorings are the guidelines followed by the metal when = it is faceted, after being soldered up. It is most often carried out on burnished pipes of high tin content. SMG  
(back) Subject: Off topic.... From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 21:48:40 -0400   I would appreciate suggestions of composers or music that would appeal to =   a person who loves Respighi's "Pines of Rome", "The Birds" and "Fountains =   of Rome". Reply privately please.   Thanks,   HD    
(back) Subject: Peterson Play BAck System From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 21:51:10 EDT     --part1_bb.20b3f0b7.2a258e0e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   My organ technician was at the church today working on and tuning the = organ. He finally gave me a ballpark figure for a play-back system for our organ. = I asked him to give me something tangible that I could show our = powers-that-be.   Do any of you have experience with the Peterson System? Any drawbacks? = Easy to use? etc?   I figure if I cannot get a real live assistant, I will at least attempt to =   use technology that is available, and use it to its fullest advantage.   Thanks in advance for any feedback. Please no flames (ok embers are alright).   Neil Brown First United Meth Church Toms River NJ USA         --part1_bb.20b3f0b7.2a258e0e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">My organ technician was at the church today = working on and tuning the organ.&nbsp; He finally gave me a ballpark = figure for a play-back system for our organ.&nbsp; I asked him to give me = something tangible that I could show our powers-that-be.<BR> <BR> Do any of you have experience with the Peterson System?&nbsp; Any = drawbacks?&nbsp; Easy to use? etc?<BR> <BR> I figure if I cannot get a real live assistant, I will at least attempt to = use technology that is available, and use it to its fullest advantage.<BR> <BR> Thanks in advance for any feedback.&nbsp; Please no flames (ok embers are = alright).<BR> <BR> Neil Brown<BR> First United Meth Church<BR> Toms River NJ USA<BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_bb.20b3f0b7.2a258e0e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Faceted pipes (was:Buzard facade) From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 21:53:24 -0400   > definitely not hammered, bud! The facets are made by scribing the pipe > metal on the side which will be inside the pipe when it rolled up Very > Carefully. The process was revived by various European pipe makers some > years ago. > Roy Redman   I remember seeing several such pipes in Amsterdam a couple of years ago. = The one I remember most distinctly was in the Nieuwe Kerk. Both the = "swallow's nest" organ and the Great Organ have them. I just figured it was a Dutch thing. Unfortunately, I'm having difficulty finding a good image on the Internet or I'd post the URL.   I've also wondered about how the faceting affects the speech of the pipe. = Is this is a recent practice or does it have historical antecedents?   Cheers, TommyLee      
(back) Subject: Re: Faceted pipes (was:Buzard facade) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 21:16:52 -0500   Another technique for decorating facade pipes was embossing. An example = of this exists in the 1666 John Loosemore organ at Nettlecombe Court, = Somerset, England.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: MEMBERSHIP & RESEARCH From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 22:12:02 -0500       DudelK@aol.com wrote:   > << Some "semi-prominent" composers > also wrote fairly easy "educational" music, and didn't want their names > associated with this easier music, so they used a fake name. > >> > Although he wasn't a "semi-prominent" composer, the late Ed Klammer, who > headed the music dept. at Concordia Publishing House for a number of = years > published a number of things using the name Paul Thomas.   As I heard it, the story was that publishing as "Paul Thomas", avoided the appearance of impropriety of the head of the music department publishing = his own material....   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: Off topic.... From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 23:47:31 EDT     --part1_71.2015fc3b.2a25a953_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/28/02 10:44:23 PM Atlantic Daylight Time, hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca writes: > I would appreciate suggestions of composers or music that would appeal = to > a person who loves Respighi's "Pines of Rome", "The Birds" and = "Fountains > of Rome".   Ya just gotta have "Fountain Reverie" by Percy Fletcher.... gorgemous!!   Bruce in the Muttestery   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg   --part1_71.2015fc3b.2a25a953_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 5/28/02 10:44:23 PM Atlantic = Daylight Time, hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I would = appreciate&nbsp; suggestions of composers or music that would appeal to = <BR> a person who loves Respighi's "Pines of Rome", "The Birds" and&nbsp; = "Fountains <BR> of Rome".</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> Ya just gotta have "Fountain Reverie" by Percy Fletcher....&nbsp; = gorgemous!!<BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_71.2015fc3b.2a25a953_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re:Consider my cat Jeffrey From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 04:24:30 +0000   Dear Domitila, Thanks for your post. It's actually a Viscount - unless they use the name Johannus in your part of the world. John Foss     >From: dballesteros@uol.com.br >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: pipechat@pipechat.org >Subject: Re:Consider my cat Jeffrey >Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 14:08:49 -0300 (BRT) >   _________________________________________________________________ Join the world=92s largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail. http://www.hotmail.com