PipeChat Digest #2876 - Wednesday, May 29, 2002
 
The rest of the known world
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Most Unusual Pipe
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Most Unusual Pipe, oops!
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
More information please . . .
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Most Unusual Pipe
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
OHS Convention June 25-July 1
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
RE: A voice in church this morning
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: The rest of the known world
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: The rest of the known world
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: More information please . . .
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
What motivation drives one in his "job"?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Kimball Municipal Organs: In a sad state
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
P.S. on The Memphis Kimball......
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: The rest of the known world From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 06:48:26 EDT     --part1_197.79a9a6a.2a260bfa_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Interesting topic. I went to the local library and checked out recordings of Spanish organs. WOW! Their reeds certainly have a different tonal quality than their = Western European/American counterparts. The term, Regal, merely hints of the contrasts. No mellow Tuba/Bombarde wounds for them. Their reeds are definitely "In your face!" almost sarcasticly raspy sounding, a quality I = was slow to appreciate, however, actually miss in more western oriented = organs.   Stan Krider Red Dirks@aol.com     In a message dated 05/29/2002 5:11:56 AM Eastern Daylight Time, cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk writes:   > Nevertheless, there ARE very different instruments in Spain, in Italy = and in > Eastern Europe....so what do we know about them? > > For starters, what do members know of the great organs at Toledo, = Granada > etc etc? > > And what about the very large organ of Milan Cathedral? > > WE NEED TO KNOW!! (Well I do anyway) > --part1_197.79a9a6a.2a260bfa_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Interesting topic. <BR> I went to the local library and checked out recordings of Spanish organs. = WOW! Their reeds certainly have a different tonal quality than their = Western European/American counterparts. The term, Regal, merely hints of = the contrasts. No mellow Tuba/Bombarde wounds for them. Their reeds are = definitely "In your face!" almost sarcasticly raspy sounding, a quality I = was slow to appreciate, however, actually miss in more western oriented = organs.<BR> <BR> Stan Krider<BR> Red Dirks@aol.com<BR> <BR> <BR> In a message dated 05/29/2002 5:11:56 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk writes:</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Nevertheless, = there ARE very different instruments in Spain, in Italy and in Eastern = Europe....so what do we know about them?<BR> <BR> For starters, what do members know of the great organs at Toledo, Granada = etc etc?<BR> <BR> And what about the very large organ of Milan Cathedral?<BR> <BR> WE NEED TO KNOW!!&nbsp; (Well I do anyway)<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_197.79a9a6a.2a260bfa_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Most Unusual Pipe From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 06:54:24 EDT     --part1_46.2816ddcd.2a260d60_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Greetings,   Could this be a pipe made by Schopp? I once visited their factory, and in = the lobby they displayed some most unusual pipes finishes, both wood and = metal. As I recall, one pipe might have looked as the one described here.   Stan Krider Red Dirks@aol.com   In a message dated 05/29/2002 5:11:56 AM Eastern Daylight Time, mike3247@earthlink.net writes:   > > The cover photo on the June issue shows the facade > of a new Buzzard Organ, and smack in the middle is the > most unusual looking pipe I have ever seen. It looks > faceted like a jewel and is replete with a normal > looking mouth with ears. I wonder if this pipe speaks, > or is simply decorative? It is surrounded by normal > smooth metal pipes that look authentic enough. The > finish on all the facade pipes is a highly polished > brass tone, and they look spectacular. I wonder what > they are made of and how the finish id attained. >     --part1_46.2816ddcd.2a260d60_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Greetings,<BR> <BR> Could this be a pipe made by Schopp? I once visited their factory, and in = the lobby they displayed some most unusual pipes finishes, both wood and = metal. As I recall, one pipe might have looked as the one described here. = <BR> <BR> Stan Krider<BR> Red Dirks@aol.com<BR> <BR> In a message dated 05/29/2002 5:11:56 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = mike3247@earthlink.net writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The cover photo on the June issue shows the facade<BR> of a new Buzzard Organ, and smack in the middle is the<BR> most unusual looking pipe I have ever seen. It looks<BR> faceted like a jewel and is replete with a normal<BR> looking mouth with ears. I wonder if this pipe speaks,<BR> or is simply decorative? It is surrounded by normal<BR> smooth metal pipes that look authentic enough. The<BR> finish on all the facade pipes is a highly polished<BR> brass tone, and they look spectacular. I wonder what<BR> they are made of and how the finish id attained.<BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_46.2816ddcd.2a260d60_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Most Unusual Pipe, oops! From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 06:59:48 EDT   He who writes and presses the "Send" first, and then consults website is = made to look foolish.   Obviously, the pipe was made by Buzard Organs. I guess the technology to produce such beautiful finishes is industry-wide.   Red-faced,   Stan Krider Red-Dirks@aol.com  
(back) Subject: More information please . . . From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 07:04:30 -0500   The Anglican Digest for Whitsuntide 2002 lists a   $10,000 bequest to St. Andrew's, New Orleans, Louisiana, from the estate of Marie Louis Renaud. As a result of this bequest, the Church was able to purchase and install a pipe organ.   Can anyone please shed more light on this news? What did they buy and from where? In what condition? Who installed? What is the stop list? Stuff like that.   Inquiring minds and all that . . . .   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: RE: Most Unusual Pipe From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 09:36:23 -0500   The Pilzecker organ in St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral in Detroit has = several similarly fashioned pipes in both its gallery and chancel facades. It's a feature that immediately catches one's visual attention.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Mike Gettelman [mailto:mike3247@earthlink.net] Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 6:38 PM To: Pipechat Subject: Most Unusual Pipe     Greetings on this fine day, It is a fine day always when my Diapason copy arrives. The cover photos are always fantastic and I voraciously consume the content even though I should be working. It is a tradition at the shop, that I will be of no use for a solid half an hour after my Diapason arrives. :-) The cover photo on the June issue shows the facade of a new Buzzard Organ, and smack in the middle is the most unusual looking pipe I have ever seen. It looks faceted like a jewel and is replete with a normal looking mouth with ears. I wonder if this pipe speaks, or is simply decorative? It is surrounded by normal smooth metal pipes that look authentic enough. The finish on all the facade pipes is a highly polished brass tone, and they look spectacular. I wonder what they are made of and how the finish id attained. For those who do not receive the Diapason, the organ is located at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Denver. It is far from complete at this point with 14 stops 17 ranks. It will be 27 stops 32 ranks when all the preparations are eventually filled in. It has none of its reeds yet at all, and the entire Antiphonal Division is only prepared for at this point. The specification for this organ as well as some pictures showing the unusual pipe I mentioned above can be seen at: http://www.buzardorgans.com/opus/opus26-list.html. The best picture of the facade is on the their home page at: http://www.buzardorgans.com/   Cheers Mike     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: OHS Convention June 25-July 1 From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 10:57:54 -0400   After June 1, the registration fee for the entire OHS convention rises = $20. If you are planning to come to the convention, save the $20 and register = by Friday (postmark Friday, May 31, is OK).   The convention begins on Tuesday evening, June 25, and continues through Monday evening, July 1. One may register for the entire convention or for individual days if one's schedule does not permit attendance at the entire convention.   The hotel is also filling, so it would be wise to make reservations right away. The hotel has agreed to extend the special convention rate to June 7 (it was to have expired on June 2). It is better to make reservations via the hotel's toll number and not via the toll-free number (which, it turns out, is answered in Canada -- there have been problems . . . ).   A thumbnail list of convention organ concerts (37 of them will happen with as many organs and organists) and a few lectures appears in the = registration form, with further information in the latest issue of The Tracker. Registration forms have been mailed to OHS members twice. Even if you're not an OHS member, you can register for the convention (and become a = member at the same time). The registration form and thumbnail list of concerts = is downloadable from http://www.organsociety.org Click on "Conventions" at = the left, then on "Chicago." Or, we can FAX one to you if you call us at 804-353-9226.        
(back) Subject: RE: A voice in church this morning From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 11:39:10 -0400   I don't see how allowing one's entire profession to be a doormat year = after year is a necessary concomitant of a profound commitment to it.       > -----Original Message----- > From: Alan Freed [SMTP:acfreed0904@earthlink.net] > Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 5:49 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: A voice in church this morning > > > So is the tuner failing to "make something of himself?" No more than > the > > teacher awhile back who discovered that his district's custodians were > paid > > more than the teachers. The next year he showed up in the same = school, > as > > the janitor. > > > Obviously with a profound commitment to his calling. > > Alan > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: The rest of the known world From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 30 May 2002 07:39:10 +1200   It was E.Power Biggs many years ago who stated that horizontal Iberian = reeds often sound like a 16ft chainsaw. Ross Spanish organs. WOW! Their reeds certainly have a different tonal = quality than their Western European/American counterparts. The term, Regal, merely hints of the contrasts. No mellow Tuba/Bombarde wounds for them. Their = reeds are definitely "In your face!" almost sarcasticly raspy sounding, a = quality I was slow to appreciate, however, actually miss in more western oriented organs.        
(back) Subject: Re: The rest of the known world From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 17:48:54 EDT     --part1_182.8fc3960.2a26a6c6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/29/02 7:49:09 AM Atlantic Daylight Time, Wuxuzusu@aol.com writes: > went to the local library and checked out recordings of Spanish organs. = WOW! > Their reeds certainly have a different tonal quality than their Western > European/American counterparts. The term, Regal, merely hints of the > contrasts. No mellow Tuba/Bombarde wounds for them. Their reeds are > definitely "In your face!" almost sarcasticly raspy sounding, a quality = I > was slow to appreciate, however, actually miss in more western oriented > organs.   This is one of the reasons that I like to see "period" instruments built = so that many, many more people can be exposed to and LEARN to appreciate the authentic styles of other countries and periods of organ building. = Drawing a "Spanish Trompette" on an American-Classic instrument just somehow does = not cut it!! ;-)   Bruce in the Muttestery   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg   --part1_182.8fc3960.2a26a6c6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 5/29/02 7:49:09 AM Atlantic = Daylight Time, Wuxuzusu@aol.com writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">went to the local = library and checked out recordings of Spanish organs. WOW! Their reeds = certainly have a different tonal quality than their Western = European/American counterparts. The term, Regal, merely hints of the = contrasts. No mellow Tuba/Bombarde wounds for them. Their reeds are = definitely "In your face!" almost sarcasticly raspy sounding, a quality I = was slow to appreciate, however, actually miss in more western oriented = organs.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0">This is one of the = reasons that I like to see "period" instruments built so that many, many = more people can be exposed to and LEARN to appreciate the authentic styles = of other countries and periods of organ building.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = Drawing a "Spanish Trompette" on an American-Classic instrument just = somehow does not cut it!!&nbsp; ;-)<BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Bruce in the = Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_182.8fc3960.2a26a6c6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: More information please . . . From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 17:51:58 EDT     --part1_4a.c2343ce.2a26a77e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/29/02 9:05:04 AM Atlantic Daylight Time, gksjd85@direcway.com writes: > Can anyone please shed more light on this news? What did they buy and > from where? In what condition? Who installed? What is the stop list? > Stuff like that. > > Inquiring minds and all that . . . . >   EGAD! You want actual discussion of organs??? ;-)   Bruce in the Muttestery   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg   --part1_4a.c2343ce.2a26a77e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 5/29/02 9:05:04 AM Atlantic = Daylight Time, gksjd85@direcway.com writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Can anyone please = shed more light on this news? What did they buy and<BR> from where?&nbsp; In what condition?&nbsp; Who installed?&nbsp; What is = the stop list?<BR> Stuff like that.<BR> <BR> Inquiring minds and all that . . . .<BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> EGAD!&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; You want actual discussion of = organs???&nbsp;&nbsp; ;-)<BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_4a.c2343ce.2a26a77e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: What motivation drives one in his "job"? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 17:58:43 -0400   On 5/29/02 11:39 AM, "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > I don't see how allowing one's entire profession to be a doormat year = after > year is a necessary concomitant of a profound commitment to it. > > Well, OK, Paul. But, in addition to "doormat" being possibly a bit = strong, I remember my son, about 19 or 20 at the time, getting a job in = Rockefeller Center in October 1974 or 1975ish. Union job in building maintenance--basically janitorial. A month later his co-workers were talking about "Christmas bonus time" coming up. There were hopes that it might be quite generous. Some warned him, though, that his might not be = so big, since he'd come on only in October. Made sense to him. Came the = night they gave out the envelopes. He opened his and was ecstatic! It was = $500. Then, in the locker room, as the guys were changing back into their street clothes, he discovered that the "standard" amount received was $1,000. He was crushed--even though he'd been forewarned. Five minutes earlier, $500 had been a small fortune, and spelled a great Christmas for himself and = the wife (and baby on the way, as I recall). But now, it was a disgusting disappointment.   But what if > > the teacher awhile back [had NOT] discovered that his district's = custodians > > were paid more than the teachers[?]   He'd have remained happy (well, marginally satisfied) with his (admittedly lousy) teacher's salary? And he'd rather be a custodian at higher pay = than a teacher at lower pay, so long as didn't know about the (disgusting) discrepancy? He's happier now? Because of the money?   Well, I worked a couple years (in semi-retired status) for a French industrial design firm, for good money, as admin for their New York = office. Good money, but basically (somehow) less than satisfying, knowing that, at best, I'm helping run a company that designs perfume bottles, stoppers, labels, and boxes. I was GLAD (Jan. 1999) to get the opportunity to work for less as administrator of a parish program dealing with the homeless, = the hungry, and refugees from Kosovo, Bosnia, etc.   But OK. Each of us follows his own best lights, I guess.   Alan (probably not making his point, but trying)      
(back) Subject: Re: Kimball Municipal Organs: In a sad state From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 20:05:34 EDT   I grew up playing the Memphis Kimball. And I must correct the size of it: = it was a total of 115 ranks and dispersed as follows:   Dixon-Myer's Auditorium (Auditorium North Hall, seating capacity around 10,000) 74 ranks, 5 manual master console (controlling north and south hall = organs) *The north hall had adjustable louvres in the ceiling that altered the acoustics according to various needs and demands. When they were all = closed, it sounded like St. Paul's in London and when opened, like a less = cavernous, more intimate playhouse.   Music Hall (Auditorium South Hall, seating capacity 2500) 41 ranks, 4 manual console controlling only those ranks   The following information may be a bit off, since I cannot locate my file = on the organ and building right now, but it should be at least very close to accurate:   The building was built sometime around 1910, and used as an arena and showroom floor-type thing. The stagehouse was common to both sides, but = had a huge wall that lowered (ever so slowly) thereby dividing the stages and auditoriums. The hallways around the entire building were in the shape of = a huge, continuous rectangle with the auditoriums in the middle. It was a beige brick building with decorative concrete finials and border work = around the roofline. It was absolutely behemoth and could be seen for blocks. = It was situated on Main Street, right on the river bank and was quite = impressive from the bridges entering downtown Memphis, from Mud Island or from the = river itself. It was right down the street from the Orpheum Theatre, which was built in 1928 to replace the Grand Opera House and was renamed "Malco" in = the 1940's. It is once again the Orpheum. In the 60's, when the Cook = Convention Center was built, a glass enclosure and over street walkway were built to connect the two buildings. I fail to see why the thing had to be torn = down. It is very sad and disgraceful in every way!!!   The North hall (big side) resembles a New England Congregational meeting house as it had main floor seats and horseshoe balconies which went all = the way to the border of the proscenium arch on both sides, and on two = different levels. The seats next to the proscenium had the worst sight lines in the =   entire building as one saw nothing but a direct view into the wings. The =   balcony was largest at the back of the hall of course. The orchestra pit = on the North side was huge, seating about 125 musicians and was on a lift. = The Memphis Symphony, The Mid South Ballet and the opera company (whose name escapes me right now) all performed there. The organ was located in = chambers directly in the stage house, lined up left to right (with horizontal shutters), was completely under expression and spoke down onto the stage = and also through tone chutes about the proscenium into the house. One could = walk along this huge catwalk from one end of the chambers to the other. When = it was playing, it was almost unbearable due to the sheer power of the = pressures and scalings, but what a sound!!!!!!!!!   While not a direct sound, believe me when I say that it absolutely roared = and shook the vast concrete arena floor, especially when the full length 32' wooden Contra Bombarde was on. my GOD what a sound! Sonic presence is an =   understatement! The Echo division's chamber was at the extreme northeast =   corner of the building, over the back right corner of the balcony (from = the stage). It truly sounded a mile away with its Fern Flute, Vox Ethereale = (or Amorosa or SOMETHING!) and Chimes. I played the 5 manual organ for many graduations and other occasional special functions. I miss the Saturday morning work sessions when I could go down there, watch Bill Oberg and his =   crew work on both organs and then play and play and play. Those were the days. Somewhere, I have pictures of me at those consoles and in the = chambers in a tux.   The enormous 5 manual console was originally located in the right side = (stage left) of the orchestra pit and was last situated on the main floor, at the immediate right of the pit on a slightly elevated platform. It was from = this vantage point that I played it. The sound literally cascaded down onto = the console and the player. As stated previously by another individual who = played the instrument, the delay was quite intense, much worse than the Detroit = Fox Wurlitzer, and one literally had to build up to being able to perform with =   any continuity on the organ. The delay coupled with the huge rolling acoustics was truly a challenge even to the most seasoned players. I remember one of my organ teachers, Dr. John L. Hooker, playing a recital = and ending with the Willan's "Introduction, Passacaglia and Fugue in E-flat minor" and the sound of that triumphant instrument under his capable = hands. I have a recording of that recital that I made onto cassette, it was = during an AGO dinner (on the stage) and recital which followed. I also remember = him playing "Jupiter" from Holst's "The Planets" and using the South hall's 41 =   ranks as "the Antiphonal organ" What an effect! My high school had its graduation in the South hall every year and I played the organ as prelude = and postlude music for these ceremonies.   The South hall (small side) was laid out basically like a movie palace or opera house, with main floor, loge, mezzanine and balcony. It even had "opera boxes" on the main floor and second level. The pit was stationary = and could seat about 50. The console was in the extreme left side (stage = right) of the pit and the four chambers opened directly into the uppermost level = of the balcony. One could sit up there and watch the expression shutters = flap open and closed. They looked like four huge windows with brass grating behind which the shutters were. On the South side, the chambers were installed over the stage and on a shelf that protruded from the top of the =   proscenium. The South hall chambers were back to back but below the North =   hall chambers. All of the blowers were in a separate room on the extreme west side of the building, overlooking the Mississippi River and = surrounded by a big chain link fence and gate.   The late Bill Oberg, from W. Memphis, Arkansas, was the curator who = unearthed the 5 manual console in the 70's and got the whole thing playing again. = He used to throw the knife switches when the organ didn't need to be used and =   kept the roll tops locked. The AGO dinner/recital mentioned above was scheduled to honor his memory and to mount a plaque to the console in = honor of all of his work and maintenance in getting the beast playing again. = The big console had been "entombed" in the basement in the 50's and Bill found = it and brought it back to the auditorium and got it playing again. It was = the first organ I had ever seen with a panel allowing the organist to arrange = any of the expressive divisions on the expression pedal of his choice.   I had the specification, but cannot seem to find them at the moment. Does =   anyone else have the spec for this one? She was a grand old girl indeed. = It made one hell of a roar in that cavernous building. It had Tubas = Mirabilis and Sonora, French Trumpets and Cornopeans. Melophones, Philomela's and Stentorphones, Diaphonic and myriad "regular" Open Diapason ranks. And, = of course, strings and pedal galore. Lastly, I do not think there was an orchestral or imitative reed that was = not in that organ. I must say- they sure don't build 'em like that anymore. = It was built in either 1926 or 28 and was designed and dedicated by Charles = M. Courboin. William H. Barnes was in attendance during the pre-recital rehearsals and for the dedication, and was known to have commented specifically on the power and tonal grandeur of the North Hall Swell = division and of the overall expressive capabilities of the instrument since it was totally under expression.   Ironically, there is (was) also a four manual Kimball right across the = street at First United Methodist Church. I don't know what has happened to it since I left Memphis in 1983, but it was totally playing at that time. Skinners =   are certainly wonderful of course, but give me a Kimball or a Kilgen any = day!   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: P.S. on The Memphis Kimball...... From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 20:10:19 EDT   I hear that, when the demolition of the building was inevitable, the organ =   was removed by a professional organ builder and stored. Can anyone shed = any light on this one?   Scott Foppiano