PipeChat Digest #3224 - Tuesday, November 12, 2002
 
Music rack light
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
Erzahlers in the U.K.
  by "Donald Pole" <pandk@ciaccess.com>
Erzahlers CUM Silver Flutes?
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Music rack light
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Erzahlers CUM Silver Flutes?
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: Music rack light
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Widor Toccata Tempo
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: brief postludes
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: Erzahlers CUM Silver Flutes?
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: brief postludes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Postludes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: brief postludes
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: Widor Toccata Tempo
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Widor Toccata Tempo
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
RE: brief postludes
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: brief postludes
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
POSTLUDES - REPERTOIRE VS. IMPROVISATION
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: brief postludes
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Music rack light From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 05:59:19 -0500   Are there other suppliers of this product in the style of the OSI unit?   HD    
(back) Subject: Erzahlers in the U.K. From: "Donald Pole" <pandk@ciaccess.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 07:23:47 -0500     Didn't Willis shamelessly copy Skinner's creation and name it the "Sylvestrina"? He does discuss the stop in "The Rotunda".   Don  
(back) Subject: Erzahlers CUM Silver Flutes? From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 06:37:17 -0600   Donald Pole wrote:   > Didn't Willis shamelessly copy Skinner's creation and name it the > "Sylvestrina"?   Further to that, didn't some other builder, in an effort to avoid a possible Patent infringement, re-christen this "SILVER FLUTE"?   I recall having worked on an instrument with a pair of these and their construction and tonality are remarkably similar to what I have been seeing described on the list.   Curious as to what others may know of this . . .   Faithfully, -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: Re: Music rack light From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 06:41:45 -0600   Hugh Drogemuller wrote: > Are there other suppliers of this product in the style of the OSI = unit?   Are you speaking of the Music Rack Lights that are incorporated into the Music Rack on the bottom, as a ledge with fluorescent lamps to illuminate both the music and the keys?   We build our own. We buy the transformers by the case and the special 13 watt T-5 bulbs by the carton. Typically, we use an Aluminum banding around the perimeter to hold the Plexiglas that the music sits on in place. We've also done them in wood to match console interiors as needed.   Faithfully, -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: Re: Erzahlers CUM Silver Flutes? From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 07:59:10 -0600   Richard S......what form did the pipes take? I had a beautiful tapered traverse flute some time ago. it was harmonic from mid c up, fairly narrow scale, taper about 1/6, cut up of about 1/3, about a 1/5 mouth width, and pretty high tin content...oh also very thin walled.     Jon B  
(back) Subject: Re: Music rack light From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 08:00:49 -0600   Other suppliers include, Klann, Laukhuff, and our own shop.   Jon B  
(back) Subject: Widor Toccata Tempo From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Mon, 11 Nov 2002 08:32:48 -0500   Dear List,   I think the Widor Toccata is a wonderful piece. As a listener, I never fail to be inspired by it.   I have heard it all of my life, from many organists at many different tempi, but I think there are a few other pieces of music ever written that are MORE dependent on the "other" stop of the organ - the room acoustics.   The marked tempo certainly works in a very large reverberant space, but most American churches are acoustically far, far from that ideal.   I have heard Virgil Fox play it live (once), and I have several of his recordings. I have heard Felix Hell play it on several occasions and I have his recording, as well. Frankly, Virgil played it faster than Felix, but not as cleanly !   I enjoy listening to it most when it is played as fast as can be done AND KEEP the articulation CLEAN. If one can keep the staccato clean and keep the tempo high enough, the piece takes on a "bounce" that just carries those very long phrases. If you happen to have a space that supports a slower tempo, the piece takes on a more grand nature, but a slower tempo in a dead(ish) room creates a dreadful result.   The piece also becomes dreadful if it is played at a fast tempo that is perceived by the audience to be "slushy". It is not a matter of wether the organist plays it cleanly, but how it actually sounds in the space.   We often talk about the room acoustics as rather one dimensional..ie. length of reverberation TIME. Another important factor is the reverberation INTENSITY. One of the best examples of this is Slee Hall, in Buffalo, NY. (Where Felix will be playing Friday night !) The hall has a not overly long reverb time, but the response characteristics are not at all linear. The reverb in the first 1/2 second are extremely strong, fading off quickly for the following 1-1/2 seconds. This response curve creates an exciting environment for much of the repertoire.   In a space where that first few "bounces" of the sound are of lower intensity, the listeners perception is that of too much space between the notes - hence a faster tempo is necessary to "carry" the melodic line.   Perhaps, because of the business of the piece, some organists tend to lose sight of that melodic line. When that happens, the enjoyment of the piece is certainly lost and it does become a task. Are you playing the melody in the right hand right from the beginning?   This weekend I will get the opportunity to hear Felix play in two completely different venues. Slee Hall - Buffalo ( a 59 Fisk tracker) and The Cathedral Basilica of the Scared Heart in Newark, NJ ( a 1543 rank Schantz). Since I am anticipating that he will play some of the same repertoire at both venues, I am really looking forward to hearing the differences.     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY   ________________________________________________________________ Sign Up for Juno Platinum Internet Access Today Only $9.95 per month! Visit www.juno.com  
(back) Subject: Re: brief postludes From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 10:03:29 EST   As someone on the other side of the organ (i.e., a member of the congregation), I've experienced some things which help the congregation to =   realize that the prelude and postlude are integral parts of the service = (not add-ons to make the organist earn their salary). As far as preludes are concerned, a couple of ideas. First, in my congregation, the prelude = (either organ or instrumental) doesn't start until about one minute before the = stated time of the service. That way most of the congregation is already seated, =   and since there has been no music to try to talk under, it is relatively quiet. Most whispering stops once people realized that most of the other people were directing their attention to the musicians. The second way = (and one that I dislike, mainly because it takes away from the liturgical flow = of the service), is to have the minister make any announcements before the prelude, and then announce what the prelude music is. I have to admit though, that I like the opportunity to "instruct" the congregation about = some aspect of the music they are about to hear.   Postludes. You might need a core of people (such as music/worship = committee, congregational council, choir, etc) to get this started, but once it gets going, the rest (or some) of the congregation realize it's OK. Have the selected "volunteers" sit down again after the last hymn or benediction, = and focus their attention on the organist (or other musicians). If someone = tries to talk to them, they just whisper, "after the postlude", and continue listening. Soon, other people who may have wanted to listen, but felt out = of place just sitting there while others are exiting, would join them, and eventually part of the congregation would remain for the postlude. (if course, this would probably not work with the people who exit the church after recieving communion so they can avoid the congestion in the parking lot.)   Richard  
(back) Subject: Re: Erzahlers CUM Silver Flutes? From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 10:16:16 EST   The Silver Flute, or Flute d'Argent, should be built as an harmonic spitzflote. SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: brief postludes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 11:03:53 -0500   On 11/12/02 10:03 AM, "ContraReed@aol.com" <ContraReed@aol.com> wrote:   > Postludes. You might need a core of people (such as music/worship = committee, > congregational council, choir, etc) to get this started, but once it = gets > going, the rest (or some) of the congregation realize it's OK.   Richard: Very sensible post. Without anyone planning it, your "postlude" plan is "just happening" at Saint Luke's. More people stay every week, it seems, even though coffee hour beckons in the lounge.   Alan Freed Saint Luke's ELCA, Manhattan (can't recall who and where you are)    
(back) Subject: Re: Postludes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 12:46:54 -0500   On 11/12/02 11:49 AM, "Iain Davies" <iain@imageproc.com> wrote:   > Hi > Just received your email (and many others) on the subject of postludes, = and > thought I'd enquire... I'm unable to post to the group, so I hope you = don't > mind me picking on you, as the most recent 'poster'?   I don't mind in the least; glad to hear from you, and happy to talk about it. > > I'm just wondering why the congregation are expected to stay for the > postlude?   Oh, I don't think they ARE, or SHOULD BE "expected" to stay for the postlude. I'm not an organist myself, though I have studied the = instrument, and have BEEN an organist and choirmaster, and now just call myself a groupie. I speak only for myself, in that I LOVE to listen to the organ. = I normally sit in the back pew at St. Luke's, but at the postlude always go = up to the front pew and listen and watch, enraptured, to the end of the postlude. Out of our average attendance of about 80 or so, I've noticed that there are usually six or eight people who do that. Last Sunday it = must have been 10 or 12, and there were applause and "Bravo"s shouted at the = end. Bad church manners, I know, but it was (very Atypically for us) the T&F in d. I noticed that two or three people who were the first ones out made a U-turn in the narthex (once they'd heard what was being played) and came BACK, specifically to listen.   Those ten minutes (or less) are for me, each Sunday, my time of = fantasizing that I am an 18th-cntury Hungarian count with my own music room and my own instrumentalists on staff, and this is a private performance for ME.   I worship the ground our organist walks on, and he knows it and = appreciates it. I really don't care whether anyone else listens in to my private recital, but I take pleasure in the fact that a growing number of people = DO. It becomes a shared joy.   > I'd guess people come for worship. If they want to hear organ > music, surely they'd go to an organ concert?   Of course. I do that too. We have tons of them in Manhattan. Almost always our Preludes and Postludes are much more intimately TIED to the = other music of the day. And if I want to chat someone up at coffee hour, I = might some day skip the postlude; but not so far. Hey, I'm a nut.   > To be honest, organ music is > typically used in part to fill the gaps in the service - to cover up = when > people are moving back to their seats etc, and of course, when they = leave > the church.   Oh, no. Not really, in Lutheran practice. You are describing what, to = me, is a rather degraded concept of what the organ and organist are FOR. I could not deal with that interpretation. Quel horreurs! (Or however = that's spelt.)   > Similarly the prelude, which I assume contains the 'pre' as it > is before, is before the service starts - and the congregation turn up = for > the service, not for an organ concert.   Well, our "pre"lude is not "before the service" but "before the rest of = the service." Sure, latecomers are still arriving during it, but that's = because they're late, not because he's early. Everything the organist does is = part of the service. The bell rings at 11, and then he plays the prelude (typically on the opening hymn). > > Isn't it being a little arrogant to expect people to stop and listen? = Of > course they can if they like - but surely there should be no expectation > that they should?   Maybe. But not for me. I don't "expect" other people to do ANYthing = (sit, stand, listen, bow, commune, whatever). I'm just talking about ME. If = they like it as I like it, well, three cheers for them. > > Just my thoughts... > Iain > Iain: I'll appreciate any follow-up you want to venture.   Alan Freed Saint Luke's Church (ELCA) Midtown Manhattan (wondering who and where YOU are) See our beast at www.stlukesnyc.org    
(back) Subject: Re: brief postludes From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 13:04:08 EST   In a message dated 11/12/02 12:07:13 PM Eastern Standard Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   << Richard: Very sensible post. Without anyone planning it, your = "postlude" plan is "just happening" at Saint Luke's. More people stay every week, = it seems, even though coffee hour beckons in the lounge. Alan Freed Saint Luke's ELCA, Manhattan (can't recall who and where you are) >>   Richard Spittel St. Mark's Lutheran (ELCA), Baltimore, MD [ <A HREF=3D"http://www.stmarksluthbaltimore.org/">Click here: St. Mark's = Lutheran Church Baltimore</A> ]  
(back) Subject: Re: Widor Toccata Tempo From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 13:15:34 -0500   On 11/11/02 8:32 AM, "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> wrote:   > The Cathedral Basilica of the Scared Heart in Newark, NJ ( a 1543 > rank Schantz).   Doug, please forgive me, but is that the one where they sing "None But the Lonely Heart"? that is so lonely that it's terrified?   Alan, in awe of those 1543 ranks!   Sorry, guy.    
(back) Subject: Re: Widor Toccata Tempo From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 12:30:06 -0600   That's where the name comes from - the sheer volume of full organ = frightens parishioners into heart attacks....   (I love typos)     Alan Freed wrote:   > On 11/11/02 8:32 AM, "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> = wrote: > > > The Cathedral Basilica of the Scared Heart in Newark, NJ ( a 1543 > > rank Schantz). > > Doug, please forgive me, but is that the one where they sing "None But = the > Lonely Heart"? that is so lonely that it's terrified? > > Alan, in awe of those 1543 ranks! > > Sorry, guy. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: brief postludes From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 15:13:32 -0500   Bruce Miles proffers: > Postludio Festivo (from Sempre Semplice) Op 142 No 12. A kind of Nun > Danket > try-out. Shorter and nearly as effective. > Fughetta on Herr Jesu Christ. (from 20 Preludes and postludes) Op 78 No = 9. > Short and to the point - a crashing Allargando at the end. This set of = 20 > is full of good things. > I made such a list years ago, on 3x5 slips of paper. It became rather lengthy, by including many that weren't so brief or easily doable and I hadn't learned, so every time I consulted it, it gave me a little guilt = trip about not expanding my horizons more.   But a few favorites come to mind:   Dunstable: Agincourt Hymn (in the Biggs Treasury of Early Music). This is actually a hymn tune called Deo Gratias; if your hymnal has it, you might want to save this piece for when it is sung.   Gabrieli, Andrea: Canzona (in the Bonnet Histoerical collection v.1, considerably blown up-- this isn't an authentic edition by any means, but = it does make a good postlude out of the piece!)   Buxtehude: Gigue fugue in C major, Toccata in F major   Bach: Allabreve in D (a very early piece, too obscure, and perhaps underrated. Under the right conditions it's absolutely magnificent, so = much that I'd be inclined to save it for a special occasion)   Pachelbel: Fantasia in d minor; Toccata in e minor. He has written other good postludes, as a couple of people have already noted.   Marcello: Psalm 19   Zipoli: Offertory in C major (I hope I got that right. Maybe not an offertory, but definitely in C major)   Boellmann: Suite Gothique: Chorale, Menuet gothique, Toccata (3 good postludes. The toccata is a little longer then 4 minutes, but one of the easier French toccatas)   Vierne: Carillon [de Longpont] (from 24 pieces in free style)   Monnikendam, Marius: Toccata   Alain: Litanies (this actually evokes a tragic event; don't play it on a festal occasion).   Biggs, Richard Keys: Toccata on Deo Gracias (sheet music from McLaughlin-Reilly; maybe out of print now, alas).   Langlais: Chant de joie (from Neuf pieces)   Langlais: Fetes (H.W. Gray St. Cecilia series. Quite an investment to = learn and maybe 6 minutes to play, but dazzling).   Dupre: Carillon (in Sept Pieces, H.W. Gray-- likewise. I'd save these for special celebrations)   Murrill: Carillon (already recommended by several Piporg-Lers this week)   Leighton: Paean   Whitlock: Fanfare. This has a very clear ABA form with the middle section quiet and slow. All in all it takes at least 7 min., but if you're in a strictly practical mood and the church is empty by the end of the first A section, you can very satisfactorily close there.   And high on the to-learn list should be two pieces by Francis Jackson: Diversion for Mixtures and Toccata.   *************************   Two brief, effective seasonal postludes:   Bach: In dir ist Freude (Orgelbuchlein) (New Year's)   Dupre: Placulis servulus (or is that Placulus servulis-- anyway it's from his Tombeau de Titelouze) (All Saints')                   > Bruce Miles > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Tuesday, November 12, 2002 1:23 AM > Subject: brief postludes > > > > on 11/11/02 8:53 PM, Emmons, Paul at pemmons@wcupa.edu wrote: > > > > > I doubt that getting people to stay and listen quietly to a postlude > is > a > > > battle at all worth fighting; in fact I doubt that it is = liturgically > > > defensible to insist upon it. The blessing and dismissal have = already > been > > > given, right? ... So, don't > > > waste masterpieces like the great Bach fugues as ordinary-Sunday > postludes. > > > There is plenty of other repertoire that is magnificent and fitting > while > > > being somewhat coarser-grained, so that those who do want to > appreciate > it > > > can do so even through a certain amount of distraction. > > > > Can we come up with a list of sound-and-fury postludes that don't last > very > > long (since there's no point in playing after everyone has already > left)? > > Like, for example, Gigout's toccata in b minor. > > > > > > Randy Runyon > > Music Director > > Zion Lutheran Church > > Hamilton, Ohio > > runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: brief postludes From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 17:04:26 -0500   Knew I'd forget something. Here two additions to a list of recommended postludes, both from a little book of fanfares published by Novello in the 1960s. If this collection is now unavailable, it's a pity.   Wills, Arthur: Fanfare. It's barely two minutes long as written, maybe less; but I've found an natural place about 2/3 of the way through to = repeat from the beginning (perhaps on a reduced registration) and it sounds right to me that way. Wills is an unabashed Francophile. The style of this = piece combines a Langlaisian harmonic boldness and color with English ceremonial dignity. It makes quite a vivid splash in a short period of time.   Hewitt-Jones, Tony: Fanfare This, too, is brief, and sparer in texture. = It would make fine use of a large, dramatic reed to play, for the most part, only a single note at a time in arpeggiated declamations; and even better = if this reed were in an antiphonal position from the rest of the organ, = because part of its excitement is the increasing rapidity with which its motives = are tossed back and forth. But it could also work on a small two-manual with = no reeds at all. This is a rather unusual little piece by a composer whose earthy, laconic directness reminds me of Orff, but IMHO a winner.    
(back) Subject: POSTLUDES - REPERTOIRE VS. IMPROVISATION From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 17:09:05 EST     --part1_18.2835d34d.2b02d601_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hello everyone   I am very interested in what others play for their postlude (or preludes = as well). In my own experience I have played both repertoire and = improvisations on the last hymn, starting in the same key as the concluding stanza. I = tend to play more repertoire for the preludes, especially on feast days or = special days with themes that I can match with a particular piece.   I thought I would put this question out and see what others had to say. Thanks.   Scott F. Foppiano scottfop@aol.com   --part1_18.2835d34d.2b02d601_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Hello everyone<BR> <BR> I am very interested in what others play for their postlude (or preludes = as well).&nbsp; In my own experience I have played both repertoire and = improvisations on the last hymn, starting in the same key as the = concluding stanza.&nbsp; I tend to play more repertoire for the preludes, = especially on feast days or special days with themes that I can match with = a particular piece.<BR> <BR> I thought I would put this question out and see what others had to = say.&nbsp; Thanks.<BR> <BR> Scott F. Foppiano<BR> scottfop@aol.com</FONT></HTML>   --part1_18.2835d34d.2b02d601_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: brief postludes From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 17:51:59 EST     --part1_18b.11496ece.2b02e00f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 11/12/2002 3:19:03 PM Central Standard Time, pemmons@wcupa.edu writes:   > Monnikendam, Marius: Toccata > Publisher/collection?   Dale G. Rider, MSM, CAGO Organist/Director of Music Ministries First Baptist Church (American) Kansas City, Missouri Volunteer Staff Organist Community of Christ Auditorium & Temple Independence, Missouri   --part1_18b.11496ece.2b02e00f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 11/12/2002 3:19:03 PM Central = Standard Time, pemmons@wcupa.edu writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Monnikendam, = Marius: Toccata<BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> Publisher/collection?<BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Book Antiqua" LANG=3D"0">Dale G. Rider, = </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D1 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Book Antiqua" LANG=3D"0"><I>MSM, = CAGO<BR> </I>Organist/Director of Music Ministries<BR> First Baptist Church (American)<BR> Kansas City, Missouri<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Volunteer Staff = Organist<BR> <B><I>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Community of = Christ</B></I> Auditorium &amp; Temple<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Independence, = Missouri</FONT></HTML>   --part1_18b.11496ece.2b02e00f_boundary--