PipeChat Digest #3236 - Sunday, November 17, 2002
 
Re: Proper execution of Widor Toccata from the 5th - authenticity???
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Authenticity?
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
"Jungian Type"
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Hook & Hastings Opus Numbers
  by <BMichParsh@aol.com>
RE: Authenticity? Pass the decanter and a cold compress - orwhatever
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: "Jungian Type"
  by "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@optonline.net>
Re: Authenticity?
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Fox & Biggs Interpretations
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
[VERY LONG] A Pilgrimage to Hotlanta, part 1
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Fox & Biggs Interpretations
  by "John Mackey" <johnmackey@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Proper execution of Widor Toccata from the 5th - authenticity??? From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 19:47:19 EST     --part1_40.2760653d.2b099297_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I didn't call anything sinful! I have my fun occasionally too-but I have heard many a Bach recording and performance where the idiot organist ruins =   the music by adding reeds, etc.....shamelessly while their articulation = and tempo goes to pot and the music begins to sound like Mendelssohn. Yes it feels good to switch manuals in fugues-it is appropriate too-there is = nothing I love more than adding the kontraposaune 32' to the final entrance of a fugue. I love Biggs' records-the registrations too-it all works! I also love Robert Noehren's Bach. It has simply become outdated-but it is still = a musical landmark. Once again-I am going to recommend listening to David Schrader (Chicago's organ virtuoso) or Lionel Rogg's Bach recorded on a 3 manual Silbermann in Arlsheim. Gregory p.s. I have heard the entire Passacaglia performed on organo pleno (with = the standard manual changes toward the end of the prelude )and it was sublime. =     --part1_40.2760653d.2b099297_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>I didn't call anything = sinful! &nbsp;I have my fun occasionally too-but I have heard many a Bach = recording and performance where the idiot organist ruins the music by = adding reeds, etc.....shamelessly while their articulation and tempo goes = to pot and the music begins to sound like Mendelssohn. &nbsp;Yes it feels = good to switch manuals in fugues-it is appropriate too-there is nothing I = love more than adding the kontraposaune 32' to the final entrance of a = fugue. &nbsp;I love Biggs' records-the registrations too-it all works! = &nbsp;I also love Robert Noehren's Bach. &nbsp;It has simply become = outdated-but it is still a musical landmark. &nbsp;Once again-I am going = to recommend listening to David Schrader (Chicago's organ virtuoso) or = Lionel Rogg's Bach recorded on a 3 manual Silbermann in Arlsheim. <BR>Gregory <BR>p.s. I have heard the entire Passacaglia performed on organo pleno = (with the standard manual changes toward the end of the prelude )and it = was sublime. </FONT></HTML>   --part1_40.2760653d.2b099297_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Authenticity? From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 14:26:06 +1300   Sorry if this might bore you, being another screed from me, but I hope it won't. In the early 1970s I was asked to be consultant for a rebuild of = the 1929 pneumatic action Croft organ in All Saints' Anglican Church, = Palmerston North, here in NZ. What follows is almost exactly what I'd still do to the organ, including the electrification. Please note that I permitted regulation of the pipes, but strictly no revoicing or rescaling. The tone has always been pleasant, clear, and most musical, despite the 1929 date.   former present GREAT 16 Dble Op.Diap.(metal) 16 Bourdon (ex Swell, wood) 8 Open Diap. 8 Op.Diap. 8 Open Diap. 8 Op.Diap. 8 Hohl Fl. (metal) 8 Hohl Fl. 8 Dolce (cylindrical) 4 Principal 4 Principal 4 Nason (extn 16ft, wood) 4 Harm.Flute 2 2/3 12th (from old Mixture) . Mixture (12.15) 2 15th (from old Mixture) 8 Tromba 1 3/5 17th (on old Dolce slide) . (19.22) (on old Mixture slide) . (26.29) (on old Harm.Fl.slide) 8 Trumpet (English, new) 4 Clarion (extn)   SWELL 16 Bourdon 8 Open Diap. (open wood bass still) 8 Op.Diap. 8 Rohr Fl. 8 Rohr Fl. 8 Salic. 8 Salic. 8 V.Cel. (TC) 8 Cel.(TC) 4 Princ. 4 Princ. 2 2/3 Naz. (old 4ft) 4 Lieb.Fl. 2 Picc. 2 Picc. . (22.26.29) (on old 16ft = slide) 8 Horn 16 Oboe (1-12 new, full-length zinc, 8 Oboe 8 Horn   CHOIR (still encl.) 8 Dolce (TenC, indep.) 8 Gedackt 8 Gedackt 4 Flute (stopt) 4 Flute (stopt metal) 2 Gemshorn 8 Clarinet 1 1/3 Larigot (indep.Gems.) 8 Tromba (from Great) 8 Clarinet (now on unit chest) 8 Trumpet (from Great)   PEDAL 16 Open Wood 16 Open Wood 16 SubBass (i.e. 16ft open 16 Open Metal (renamed) metal, from Great) 16 Bourdon (wood) 16 SubBass (renamed) 8 Bass Flute (extn Bdn) 16 Bourdon (from Great) 8 Principal (from Grt No.1 OpDi 8 Bass Flute (extn) 4 Princ. (from Grt Op.Di.1) 4 Flute (from Grt 16ft Bdn) 2 22nd (from Grt unit) 16 Trombone (full-length zinc, extn Grt Trpt) 8 Trumpet (from Grt) 4 Clarinet (from Choir)   The design is not perfect, but it's remarkable how good the organ sounds = for all kinds of composers and styles and uses. I have no regrets whatever. = The rebuild was in 1972 and the tone is seamless with the old - bright, warm = and clear with no trace of screaming harshness. Visitors cannot tell which is new pipework and which is old. Richard Sedcole of Christchurch (Hi, Dick) supported the work and might be encouraged to add comments from his perspective.   Ross      
(back) Subject: "Jungian Type" From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 19:06:01 -0600   Not to be pedantic, but that is a Myers-Briggs Type. Jung was a heavy influence on their work, but "Jungian Type" is inaccurate   Dennis Steckley INTJ (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) ___________________________   Marika   -- Jungian Type: INTJ      
(back) Subject: Re: Hook & Hastings Opus Numbers From: <BMichParsh@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 20:14:04 EST     --part1_f7.245935b5.2b0998dc_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Opus 625-650 were built in 1872 according to the Hook Opus List, published = by OHS.   --part1_f7.245935b5.2b0998dc_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Opus 625-650 were built in 1872 according to the = Hook Opus List, published by OHS.</FONT></HTML>   --part1_f7.245935b5.2b0998dc_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Authenticity? Pass the decanter and a cold compress - orwhatever From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 01:18:44 -0000   Hello,   The Fumble Bee....   Well it just shows how authentic my historical research = is........Tchaikosky indeed!   Everyone knows it was by Rip her corset off!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK    
(back) Subject: Re: "Jungian Type" From: "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@optonline.net> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 20:22:28 -0500   Kindly e-mail privately.....   First Christian Church of Casey, IL wrote:   >Not to be pedantic, but that is a Myers-Briggs Type. Jung was a heavy >influence on their work, but "Jungian Type" is inaccurate > >Dennis Steckley >INTJ (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) >___________________________ > >Marika > >-- >Jungian Type: INTJ > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >   -- Jungian Type: INTJ        
(back) Subject: Re: Authenticity? From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 19:32:10 -0600   Ross: do I understand that the 16' Open no longer plays in the Great? what was the reasoning for this when the work was done? Was it too large a scale originally?   Jon Bertschinger Temple Organs  
(back) Subject: Fox & Biggs Interpretations From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 20:38:51 EST     --part1_177.120b7bc7.2b099eab_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Greg wrote....   > Not to say that I don't love Biggs' Bach recordings, but they are simply =   > romanticized-full of heel pedalings, flamboyant registrations including > massive cresendi and decrescendi on plenum fugues etc.....   I admit that I write in my ignorance. I have no formal training on the organ. I'm a pianist whose church, when I was 15, purchased a Conn organ requiring me to become an organist one Easter Sunday. I think I do pretty =   well for an amateur, though. I have not studied the proper interpretation = of organ literature - from any period - tho' I've picked up a few things in conversations with organists.   I have a few recordings of Biggs and Fox. I know they like to play big organs and use frequent registration changes and gradual crescendi (as = I've heard was not done in baroque music) in their interpretations. While I = think that muddies the piece (as do choirs of 150 trying to sing Messiah), the = lay public seems to like them.   My question really regards the strong emphasis some place on performing on =   "period" instruments and playing in a style that they think was used at = that time period. I guess, I'm asking whether or not we think Bach chose the particular stop settings or ways of showing expression because that way = was the way he thought best - or was that the only practical way he could.   If Bach were to be ushered to the bench of a large pipe organ of today - = with 99,999 levels of combination memory, several swell chambers, crescendo pedals, AGO pedalboard, etc. I wonder if he would make the best use of all =   these gadgets. They didn't exist in his time, that's why he didn't = utilize them - I think.   Since I'm in the mood to be a little bit of a jerk tonight, I'd like to = throw out the radical thought that Bach himself might even be delighted to sit = at the console of a modern electronic organ!?!?!? There was no other = keyboard alternative to the pipe organ when grandeur was needed. He didn't choose = to write for a pipe organ over an electronic organ or, God forbid, a = synthesizer because he had considered the other organlike keyboard options and chosen = the pipe organ. What else was there?   I'd venture to head a little further down the pathway to destruction by suggesting that, if Bach were alive today and realized that he could have = an imitation (or fake) pipe organ in his own home on which to practice, I = think he'd be excited about it. He could compose until late at night using headphones - so he wouldn't disturb anyone. I seriously question whether Bach, when faced with the cost differences between pipe organs and the electronic imitations, would do without an organ at home rather than get = the imitation. It simply wasn't an option in his day. He'd probably have a little fun as well on a synthesizer. I can't imagine what he'd do if he = had a MIDI sequencer available to him on his keyboard!   I didn't say that to get another one of those pipe vs electronic debates going. I simply meant to say that I think Bach used the instruments that were available and did the best that he could do with them. If he were around today, I submit that he'd be much more open minded than most of us about which instrument he played. I imagine that he would apply his = creative genius to whatever situation or instrument at his immediate, practical, pragmatic, and cost-effective (or whatever else) disposal. He'd probably even utilize whatever bells and whistles (swells, crescendos, pistons, = etc) that were available.   As difficult as his music can be - especially if, as I was told one time, that you're only supposed to use your toes since the pedals in his time = were too short to play with your heels - I can imagine how hard he'd make it if = he realized that our pedalboards allow an organist to use his heels!!   O well, so much for my ignorant ranting. I'm sure I'll be told where I'm mistaken.   Keith Commerce, Georgia.   --part1_177.120b7bc7.2b099eab_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Greg wrote....<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Not to say that I = don't love Biggs' Bach recordings, but they are simply <BR> romanticized-full of heel pedalings, flamboyant registrations including = <BR> massive cresendi and decrescendi on plenum fugues = etc.....</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> I admit that I write in my ignorance.&nbsp; I have no formal training on = the organ.&nbsp; I'm a pianist whose church, when I was 15, purchased a = Conn organ requiring me to become an organist one Easter Sunday.&nbsp; I = think I do pretty well for an amateur, though.&nbsp; I have not studied = the proper interpretation of organ literature - from any period - tho' = I've picked up a few things in conversations with organists.<BR> <BR> I have a few recordings of Biggs and Fox.&nbsp; I know they like to play = big organs and use frequent registration changes and gradual crescendi (as = I've heard was not done in baroque music) in their interpretations.&nbsp; = While I think that muddies the piece (as do choirs of 150 trying to sing = Messiah), the lay public seems to like them.<BR> <BR> My question really regards the strong emphasis some place on performing on = "period" instruments and playing in a style that they think was used at = that time period.&nbsp; I guess, I'm asking whether or not we think Bach = chose the particular stop settings or ways of showing expression because = that way was the way he thought best - or was that the only practical way = he could.<BR> <BR> If Bach were to be ushered to the bench of a large pipe organ of today - = with 99,999 levels of combination memory, several swell chambers, = crescendo pedals, AGO pedalboard, etc. I wonder if he would make the best = use of all these gadgets.&nbsp; They didn't exist in his time, that's why = he didn't utilize them - I think.<BR> <BR> Since I'm in the mood to be a little bit of a jerk tonight, I'd like to = throw out the radical thought that Bach himself might even be delighted to = sit at the console of a modern electronic organ!?!?!?&nbsp; There was no = other keyboard alternative to the pipe organ when grandeur was = needed.&nbsp; He didn't choose to write for a pipe organ over an = electronic organ or, God forbid, a synthesizer because he had considered = the other organlike keyboard options and chosen the pipe organ.&nbsp; What = else was there?<BR> <BR> I'd venture to head a little further down the pathway to destruction by = suggesting that, if Bach were alive today and realized that he could have = an imitation (or fake) pipe organ in his own home on which to practice, I = think he'd be excited about it.&nbsp; He could compose until late at night = using headphones - so he wouldn't disturb anyone.&nbsp; I seriously = question whether Bach, when faced with the cost differences between pipe = organs and the electronic imitations, would do without an organ at home = rather than get the imitation.&nbsp; It simply wasn't an option in his = day.&nbsp; He'd probably have a little fun as well on a synthesizer.&nbsp; = I can't imagine what he'd do if he had a MIDI sequencer available to him = on his keyboard!<BR> <BR> I didn't say that to get another one of those pipe vs electronic debates = going.&nbsp; I simply meant to say that I think Bach used the instruments = that were available and did the best that he could do with them.&nbsp; If = he were around today, I submit that he'd be much more open minded than = most of us about which instrument he played.&nbsp; I imagine that he would = apply his creative genius to whatever situation or instrument at his = immediate, practical, pragmatic, and cost-effective (or whatever else) = disposal.&nbsp; He'd probably even utilize whatever bells and whistles = (swells, crescendos, pistons, etc) that were available.<BR> <BR> As difficult as his music can be - especially if, as I was told one time, that you're only supposed to use your toes = since the pedals in his time were too short to play with your heels - I = can imagine how hard he'd make it if he realized that our pedalboards = allow an organist to use his heels!!<BR> <BR> O well, so much for my ignorant ranting.&nbsp; I'm sure I'll be told where = I'm mistaken.<BR> <BR> Keith<BR> Commerce, Georgia.<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_177.120b7bc7.2b099eab_boundary--  
(back) Subject: [VERY LONG] A Pilgrimage to Hotlanta, part 1 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 19:52:41 -0600   A PILGRIMAGE TO HOTLANTA An Odyssey in Three Parts   PART ONE   Two or three months ago I decided to make my first trip TO Atlanta. Heretofore I had been around Atlanta or through Atlanta on my way somewhere else, and had avoided the city. But with the advent of the new Mander organ at Peachtree Road United Methodist Church and the upcoming dedication concert, I decided to get all my shots, update my visas and sally forth. But not without company: I asked two friends, both engineers, one a church organist, the other a knowledgeable and well-read organophile, to accompany me.   A thread a month or two ago discussed rude organists. I have found that many organists are not rude, only apparently too busy to respond to inquiries and requests to see and hear their instruments. I am not terribly spontaneous in planning and executing projects such as this trip, and generally contact people far in advance with requests. Even even with such planning, one may not receive replies from queries (which bugs someone like me, being one of the busiest people I know, yet who takes time to return calls, make arrangements for others, and be on time to appointments unless circumstances occur outside my control - that comes from dealing with judges, who like to throw people in jail and take their money if the latter are late to court or don't follow orders). Still, the organists' world can be much like all political arenas: you sometimes have to know someone who knows the right people to get in the doors. The good ole boy system is alive and well in all facets of our lives.   Entre Larry Douglas Embury, lately resident organist at the Fox Theatre, with whom I had exchanged e-mails several times. He graciously volunteered to provide the necessary contacts for me all the way from his parents' home in Idaho, and in so doing made the weekend a memorable one. Sadly, he was not in town the weekend in question, still dealing with the all the attendant circumstances of his mother's death and making plans to move to Atlanta.   Therefore, my friends and I ventured forth on Friday, November 8, driving through the troubled state of Alabama, wherein the controversy of the governorship still raged, past the town of Auburn, where I spent several Saturdays as a teenager in the football stands beating pom-poms and screaming for the War Eagles. The day was most delightful, with brilliant blue clear skies and comfortable temperatures. After negotiating the post-rush-hour traffic of the Atlanta region, we arrived at our Marriott just off International Drive, unpacked and had dinner at Mick's, a swank little spot downtown with good food but poor service.   The next morning we were off to visit the Fox Theatre. Because the Broadway musical "Aida" was playing, the production crew had the organ console covered and inaccessible, and without my union card we were out of luck. However, this obstacle was anticipated, and we were able to tour the entire facility, a gorgeous monument to the extravagance of the Roaring Twenties, with its twin themes of Arabic and Egyptian architecture and motifs. We were so impressed with the theatre itself that we purchased tickets to "Aida" that evening.   I had made arrangements and confirmed to meet Madonna Brownlee, a fine organist and acquaintance of Virgil Fox, for lunch at the Georgian Terrace, a historic hotel across the street from the Fox. As we girls often do, we shared what color outfits we would be wearing so that we could identify each other (both of us were wearing teal). When my friends and I arrived, I could find no one matching the description, but there was a woman sitting on a sofa in a light green outfit. I went up to her and asked if she was Ms. Brownlee. When she acted as if she didn't understand me, I asked if she might be Madonna. She replied that she was a friend of Madonna's. Then she started a chatter of non sequiturs, a gibberish that I could not understand. After letting her talk for several minutes, I asked where Madonna was, and she replied that Madonna was across town with Barbara Streisand. I felt pretty sure by this time we had made a grievous error, and I excused myself to continue the search, leaving one of my friends captive with the madwoman.   I found our quarry in another part of the hotel, looking surprising young and beautiful. I explained our lateness and mistake. We extricated my friend J.O. from Madonna's newfound "friend" and subsequently enjoyed delectable lobster omelet crepes with bacon, fresh breads and coffee. Originally from Indiana, our host was every inch a Southern lady, and we had an abominably good time.   From the hotel we made our way to the First Church of Christ Scientist, across from the Woodruff Arts Center, the home of the Atlanta Symphony. This beautiful domed edifice surrounded by mini-skyscrapers (reminding me of so many New York churches such as Trinity Wall Street and St. Mary the Virgin, dwarfed by their surroundings) is where Mrs. Brownlee has served as organist for over 20 years, the building seating 650 and housing a Moller of four manuals, 58 stops and 55 ranks, installed in 1958 to replace an earlier Pilcher organ. This organ was rebuilt by Moller in 1988, according to the information sheet with stoplist provided by Madonna.   Although I have many times heard others describe Mollers as "tubby-sounding", this was the sweetest sounding Moller I have personally ever heard, a sheer delight in an equally delightful room, square, light and airy with huge windows on each side, the organ in the front with a small antiphonal in the back gallery, and the pews in a semi-circle. Madonna explained that this was a small congregation, averaging less than 200 each Sunday, but many prominent Atlantians attended. A few weeks ago she was informed that Bruce Hornsby was visiting and sitting 3 pews behind her; however, I had to describe who Bruce Hornsby was to her. We spent about two hours in the church playing and sharing music, and Madonna provided some tidbits about Virgil, my just recently having read the book "The Dish". I believe she stated that Fox played the dedication of the organ, and how riveting he was. She also recalled days when she was in college in New York City, and her dorm room was next door to Riverside where Virgil performed his nightly rehearsals. All too soon we realized how time had flown, and reluctantly took our leave after a most wonderful afternoon.   That evening the engineers decided on dinner at Pitty Pat's Porch (I kid you not), which serves such delicacies as venison in a cranberry bourbon sauce. I had lovely crabcakes, which I saved from drowning in some sort of cocktail sauce. The salad bar was filled with many fabulous exotic salads, some Southern, some not. I was only momentarily disappointed that we did not dine at The Abbey, which provided such fare as ostrich flank with rabbit confit served by waiters in monk garb.   "Aida" was quite a visual experience, enhanced greatly by the surroundings of the Fox. However, the music was entirely forgettable. As a teen I worshipped Elton John, knowing by heart almost every song. In fact, one night this week I woke up and in my insomnia could remember lyrics to many old songs, such as "Take me to the pilot", "Levon", "Elderberry wine", "Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters". However, there are times when stars need to rest on their laurels. Paul McCartney, Billy Joel, and Elton John have all forayed into other musical fields with less than satisfactory results. I at least applaud Sir Elton in remaining somewhat in the pop genre and sticking to Broadway shows, achieving some success with the Lion King and Disneyesque projects. And the writers rewrote Amneris' role making her likeable, ruining forever my Verdi bitch hero and idol. Seriously, Lisa Brescia, who played Amneris, was the star, enunciating her lyrics flawlessly so that they could be understood, and giving a stellar performance. And I have subsequently purchased a retro-CD of "Goodbye, Yellow Brick Road" just to keep Elton from starving.   Next installment: we visit St. Philip's, All Saints', and our raison d'etre (at least in Atlanta). Help me: I think I just spoke French! (I probably just ordered a shoe with cheese on it or said something nasty, so I need to go wash my mouth out with soap now.)   Regards,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Fox & Biggs Interpretations From: "John Mackey" <johnmackey@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 21:10:59 -0500   Regarding Keith's post. I'm sure that bach would "freak-out" but, in a good way at the prospect of playing an organ of 100+ stops and, who knows what gems he might have composed if he knew say, the Steinmeyer at Passau!!! On the other hand, Poor Max Reger had (For the most part) totally inadequate instruments at his disposal yet, his genius comes through and, hearing his works on a "WORLD CLASS MONSTER" is truly an awesome experience.   For me, Bach is wonderful by Biggs at the "germanic Museum" but, also great with Fox at Riverside. Come to think of it, my old, scratched-up "switched on Bach" LP was a joy to listen to as well...   Keith, I agree with you that Bach would never have been cubby-holed into "his own time" and would have enjoyed any and all venues. However, I must also appreciate the "Authentic" examples as well. I can certainly understand and appreciate those who go to great lengths to re-create and preserve our "organ history".   John