PipeChat Digest #3239 - Monday, November 18, 2002
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #3237 - 11/17/02
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Messiah
  by "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com>
RE: Recital Programmes
  by "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl>
Bach to nature
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
pay the organist?
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: pay the organist?
  by "John Mackey" <johnmackey@mindspring.com>
Re: Authenticity?
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: pay the organist?
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: Bach's Passacaglia and a liturgical year
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
RE: Of Biggs, Bach and Blockwerk
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
Cracow and Poland - a big market for organ builders
  by "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl>
bach
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Franck references
  by "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl>
Re: Of Biggs, Bach and Blockwerk(longish)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3237 - 11/17/02 From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 10:00:12 +0000   My teachers,in a direct line from the great masters of the French School, (Ralph Downes and Norman Johnson, a pupil of Andre Marchal) taught me to play with both heels and toes. I was brought up on Dupre's organ method. = The purpose is to have the ability to control precisely the movement of your feet, legato, staccato or marcato. I still find having the use of both an asset. John Foss   www.johnfoss.gr         _________________________________________________________________ The new MSN 8: advanced junk mail protection and 2 months FREE* http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/junkmail    
(back) Subject: Messiah From: "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 21:15:34 +1100   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3120498935_1436419 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   I have played the Messiah countless times both as only organ accompaniment and organ (and/or harpsichord) continuo. I have found the best score, having used several, is the Watkins Shaw, published by Novello. By far, = the majority of choirs used this edition, rather than the older Prout edition with its piano accompaniment and romantic interpretations. The Watkins = Sha=3D w has all the continuo realisations included in smaller type and the orchestral reduction for the most part is quite playable, although I tend = t=3D o do my own thing much of the time, depending on the forces (last Easter I = go=3D t up to 32=3DB9 reed at the end of the Amen and Hallelujah) - it all = depends on the situation. I have also taken the liberty of photocopying my score = onto A4 and binding it with a spiral contraption. The book now stays open = withou=3D t continually shutting and the print size is considerably larger and easier = t=3D o read.   Cheers,   Mark       --B_3120498935_1436419 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Messiah</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Verdana">I have played the Messiah countless times both as = only=3D organ accompaniment and organ (and/or harpsichord) continuo. &nbsp;I have = f=3D ound the best score, having used several, is the Watkins Shaw, published = by =3D Novello. By far, the majority of choirs used this edition, rather than the = o=3D lder Prout edition with its piano accompaniment and romantic = interpretations=3D .. &nbsp;The Watkins Shaw has all the continuo realisations included in = small=3D er type and the orchestral reduction for the most part is quite playable, = al=3D though I tend to do my own thing much of the time, depending on the forces = (=3D last Easter I got up to 32&#8217; reed at the end of the Amen and = Hallelujah=3D ) &nbsp;- it all depends on the situation. &nbsp;I have also taken the = liber=3D ty of photocopying my score onto A4 and binding it with a spiral = contraption=3D .. The book now stays open without continually shutting and the print size = is=3D considerably larger and easier to read.<BR> <BR> Cheers,<BR> <BR> Mark<BR> <BR> </FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3120498935_1436419--    
(back) Subject: RE: Recital Programmes From: "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 11:31:32 +0100 (CET)       > Hello, > > However, to return to the original intention, I offer what I would = regard as > a very "balanced" programme inspired by the advice given by Dr Francis > Jackson. It was he who advised that a good recital always had > a light "starter", something "meaty with gravy", a frivolous > "sweet" and, most importantly, "something for the old ladies". > It is advice which I have always followed when asked to give a recital. > Colin Mitchell > UK   I remember David's Titterington recipe as regards to a recital arrangement. He said that a performer should "grab the listeners at the throat at the beginning of the recital and hold them to the end".   Regards,   Marek Miskowicz Cracow, Poland    
(back) Subject: Bach to nature From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 11:10:57 -0000     Hello,   Historical research demonstrates conclusively that P.D.Q.Bach was = extremely innovative, and he would surely have used ANY electronic means = to produce sound (rather than music). A Bach Chip would almost certainly = be used...........=20   "Big" Bach was also extremely innovative (not to mention productive) and = showed an interest in Pianos. He also played the Violin, the Harpsichord = and the Lute, brawled with students and drank.....God = forbid......Coffee. Would he have used a tracker action coffee grinder = today? Of course not!   Any fool knows that "Daddy" Bach played Wurlitzers.......OK they were = violins, but the rot was setting in. Where else, but from an organist, did violinists get the silly idea of = playing their instruments with a vibrato?   Anyway, it isn't just the public who are fools.....look at the way = modern "classical" music has gone. Indeed, just look at the public!! Youth now wear saggy trousers and = "moon" at passers-by.   Even the "learned" had no respect for "Daddy" Bach when he died. Indeed, = had it not been for Meddlesome Felix, we would all have been spared = this contrapuntal nonsense and an awful lot of hard work.   Bach's music is for covering jam-pots! =20   If only I could find that old recipe, I would show you what musical = preservation means!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK          
(back) Subject: pay the organist? From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 07:54:54 EST     --part1_114.1ac805a7.2b0a3d1e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear List: A query for those who hire orchestras:   Our organist is paid at just below AGO guidelines for the regular = duties--2 services, choir rehearsal, extra seasonal services, etc. Several weeks = ago, I offererd to pay him to orchestrate 2 numbers we're doing for our = Christmas concert. I have run into outrage from our personnel committee, who feel that since everyone else is doing extra work with no additional = compensation, so should he (we're talking less than $100, btw).   In a separate but related issue, I have an assistant ($8/hour) who is a = fine violist, and also a member of the church, as well as a volunteer in the handbell choir. The expectation is that she should play in this concert = for her regular hourly salary, instead of the fee for the rest of the intrumentalists ($165).   My opinion is that the organist should be paid for work outside the job description (the "and other duties as assigned" part of his job = description notwithstanding), and the violist should be paid the fee everybody else is =   getting. I need to know what your practice is--how does your church handle similar situations?   Thanks much   Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA   --part1_114.1ac805a7.2b0a3d1e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear List:<BR> A query for those who hire orchestras:<BR> <BR> Our organist is paid at just below AGO guidelines for the regular = duties--2 services, choir rehearsal, extra seasonal services, etc.&nbsp; = Several weeks ago, I offererd to pay him to orchestrate 2 numbers we're = doing for our Christmas concert.&nbsp; I have run into&nbsp; outrage from = our personnel committee, who feel that since everyone else is doing extra = work with no additional compensation, so should he (we're talking less = than $100, btw).<BR> <BR> In a separate but related issue, I have an assistant ($8/hour) who is a = fine violist, and also a member of the church, as well as a volunteer in = the handbell choir.&nbsp; The expectation is that she should play in this = concert for her regular hourly salary, instead of the fee for the rest of = the intrumentalists ($165).<BR> <BR> My opinion is that the organist should be paid for work outside the job = description (the "and other duties as assigned" part of his job = description notwithstanding), and the violist should be paid the fee = everybody else is getting.<BR> I need to know what your practice is--how does your church handle similar = situations?<BR> <BR> Thanks much<BR> <BR> Steven Skinner<BR> Minister of Music<BR> First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant<BR> Erie, PA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_114.1ac805a7.2b0a3d1e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: pay the organist? From: "John Mackey" <johnmackey@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 08:21:48 -0500       Steskinner@aol.com wrote: > > Dear List: > A query for those who hire orchestras: > I have run into outrage from > our personnel committee, who feel that since everyone else is doing > extra work with no additional compensation, so should he (we're > talking less than $100, btw). > > Gee, I wonder if these are the same people who find no problem in authorizing $900. for a plumber (Nice guy with a GED) to fix a leaking water pipe in 42 minutes flat!!! One a my dear friends is scraping by with those $100. per gig jobs trying to pay off her $50,000. student loan and working at a restaurant.   Sometimes there's no justice.   Sorry this post has nothing to do with hiring orchestras.   John   PS Nothing against plumbers either.  
(back) Subject: Re: Authenticity? From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 08:36:18 -0600   Ross:   Knowing this about the 16's makes much more sense. As of recent years working more with the Bach Trio works (all sorts of them), actually it stemmed from a Master Class with Peter Williams in the 80's, I find more and more use for an open 16' in the Great division. One of our Recent installations included 2: 16' Prestant in the Great and a 16' Pedal Principal. Both were in the cases, the Pedal Principal being almost 3 scales larger than the Great Prestant. It's quite a significant sound. I don't beard any of the pipes, so wind pressures were at 3". Either stop adds an almost "bowing" affect to the chorus. Either one adds gravity to the chorus, but not any "mud". We were fortunate to have pretty good acoustics in the room as well.     Thanks for your repost with additional data.     Sincerely,   Jon Bertschinger Tonal Director Temple Organs Saint Joseph, MO (North Kansas City area)  
(back) Subject: Re: pay the organist? From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 09:01:49 -0600   Perhaps the organist could keep a log for a month of practice times? Then having done that, and add into it the rehearsal times and service times, divide into the money received. I bet it will come to about $4.50 an hour or so. Maybe I'm wrong, but....that's the way it works for me. Not to mention the phone calls to pick my brain about something for the service (I think Lawyers bill that too? (btw..I like a few lawyers)).   Jon Bertschinger   serving two Presbyterian Churches...each with different musical goals on Sunday mornings.  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach's Passacaglia and a liturgical year From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 13:07:44 -0500   Dear Marek, I was in your city in 97. It is a really beautiful town but didn't = see nor hear many organs. I also was in Krosno south of you and it was the = same case. Part of my family comes from Iwonicz Zdroj. Do you have any suggestions if I possibly return to see, hear and possibly play some good organs in Krakow or that area. We were in both Jasionka and Lubatowa and in one case the organ = facade was there but there were speakers behind the facade and a keyboard on a table. In the second case, neither I, my son nor the parish priest could figure out how to turn it on. I thought it would be a real tribute to tradition for a second generation American to play a Polish processional when he came back to his roots. (Twoja Czesc Chwala) Paul   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 4:36 AM Subject: Bach's Passacaglia and a liturgical year     > > > Marek, > > Wow, I think you have just written the BEST post I've ever read on = this list! > > Thanks so much, you must have really studied your organ history or teach it > > now! Since you had such an in-depth answer about the Passacaglia, do you > > know the original folk song that Bach based the g minor fugue (from fantasia > > and fugue) on? I have been searching for months... > > Good day, off to church now! > > Gregory. > > Thanks, Gregory. > The issue of passacaglia has haunted me for many years. I studied it = quite > much. I found among other things a novel titled "Passacaille" written by > French writer Robert Pinget which is based on the passacaglia form. > The construction of this work is, like in music, based on the idea of > repetition. Throught the whole work the "refrain" consisting of words > "Stile. Grau...." appears (in German translation) and talks about the > death of running time. > > And the other problem. Maybe somebody could help me. > A few years ago during an organ masterclass Marie-Clair Alain said that > the variations of Bach's Passacaglia are composed according to the > liturgical year. Each variation is based on some choral melody: > from the first - Nun kom der Heiden Heiland to the last - Pentecost > chorales (I don't remember the titles of all chorales which Marie-Clair > Alain has mentioned). > I have not found any confirmation of this suggestion in papers and works > about Bach's Passacaglia. > Maybe somebody can identify some of them on the basis of melodic = material > of particular variation? > > Regards, > > Marek Miskowicz > Cracow, Poland > > P.S. Gregory, I will look for the title of the folk song > from the g minor fugue. > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: RE: Of Biggs, Bach and Blockwerk From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 13:40:28 -0500   At 08:12 PM 11/17/2002 +0000, you wrote: >Hello, > >I always enjoyed the Biggs Harvard recordings of Bach, but enjoyment does =   >not necessarily endorse authenticity. > >What IS authentic Bach, I wonder? > >With powerful romantic-style instruments and swell-boxes, it is certainly =   >possible to play Bach in a romantic manner, but the music itself will >always outshine the performance and still manage to say "something". > >Go back to the original organs and it soon becomes apparent that contrast =   >is much more important than degrees of amplitude. The effect of adding >just one or two stops can be absolutely amazing. > >Think perhaps, of the Bach B-minor Fugue, which can be played Pleno, >certainly. Let's assume a start on 8ft to Mixtures, with no couplers and >the Pedal organ being drawn at 16ft to Mixtures....a happy enough pleno = sound. > >Using rubatti within a strict tempo, the B-minor fugue is especially >dramatic. Change manuals to a Positive Organ with brighter registration = at >the appropriate moment, then as the left hand falls back onto the Great >(Hauptwerk) the pleno has expamded to include the 32ft Pedal ranks and = the >16ft manual ranks......a huge increase in sonority, but little increase = in >power. > >Somewhere towards the end, as Pedal entries (including redundant enties?) =   >pile up in a musical traffic jam, the addition of Pedal CHORUS reeds adds =   >a certain gravitas and marcato. But the "piece de resistance" is to = couple >full Positive, complete with Cimbel Mixture at the final Pedal entry in B =   >minor.....the effect is quite stunning on the right organ in the right >acoustic. > >However, note that the actual "power" of the organ has increased very >little, and any changes of registraion have involved just one or two = stops >at a time. > >I feel quite sure that Bach would not play his own works without changes >to the registration.....especially a work like the Passacaglia and Fugue >in C minor, which simply could not be played "plemo" throughout. Bach was =   >a great musical dramatist, and whilst the harpsichord offers clues to >performance practice, so does the high operatic drama of the St.Matthew >Passion. > >Bach was certainly not afraid to use the most modern dramatic devices, = and >even allowing for the fact that his great organ works date from an = earlier >period by and large, I suspect that Bach was always the "red blooded" = musician. > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell >UK   Colin,   I think this movement for the authentic Bach, is still trying to figure = out how Bach would play his own works, how Bach would play his own works if he =   had the ideal organ at his disposal, or how Bach may play if he chatted on =   the internet. These are all interesting imponderables.   From my vantage point, I remember when Walcha and Biggs were in, then it was Hurford and Alain, then Van Ortmersson, Koopman, Preston and possibly Rubsam and others. Each was supposedly "authentic" in their day. Then = you have organ tonal design, from the brightened up romantic organs to neo-baroque, to truer baroque. It seems we are learning and unlearning a lot every 15 or 20 years or so.   From what I have read, I agree with you Colin, Bach was a virtuoso, and apparently a very colourful one at that. Why so many performers play Bach =   on one registration from beginning to end, and quite often not very well, is beyond me.   A composition like the Passacaglia (one of my favorites), is all too frequently played on a plenum registration with very little change throughout, it becomes a marathon type listening experience. If each = time the theme comes up and the registration changes, it is much easier to follow the architecture of the piece, and it is also easier on the ears. It is also much more dramatic.   Just my thoughts.............   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: Cracow and Poland - a big market for organ builders From: "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 20:23:33 +0100 (CET)       > Dear Marek, > I was in your city in 97. It is a really beautiful town but didn't see > nor hear many organs. > I also was in Krosno south of you and it was the same > case. Part of my family comes from Iwonicz Zdroj. Do you have any > suggestions if I possibly return to see, hear and possibly play some = good > organs in Krakow or that area.   Unfortunately, there are not many interesting organs in Cracow. I can mention three: Beckerath in Nowa Huta, Klais in philharmony and the newest (a month old) Schuke in Academy of Music. All these organs have quite interesting universal disposition. It is the advantage on one hand, but the disadvantage, on the other, because it is difficult to play them special kind of literature, e.g. French classical organ = music. We have in Cracow many good organists: Joachim Grubich, Jozef Serafin, Andrzej Bialko and the young generation - Marcin Szelest, Waclaw Golonka and Arkadiusz Bialic (2nd price in Chartres organ competition this year). Cracow is the Pope city and has many places connected with him.   I think Poland in the near future could be a big market for organ building. There is a big number of new churches which have not the pipe organ. For example in Cracow there are about 20 big parishes with 10-20 thousands of faithful and about 10 masses every Sunday played on an electronic (!) instrument. The problem is money, of course. But the polish currency is more and more strong so the conditions for foreign companies becomes more interesting. I think, the foreign organ builders should observe the polish market. Now, the polish organ builders offer instruments (with mechanical action) for 5500 - 7500$ per stop. And the quality is often not satisfied. There is still no foreign organ builder on our market. Maybe somebody from the list?   It is also my interest to encourage you to build the organs in Poland. Maybe I will play one of them?   Regards,   Marek Miskowicz Cracow, Poland    
(back) Subject: bach From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 14:27:01 EST     --part1_17b.11c4b665.2b0a9905_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Tim- I am quite familiar with the sounds of those organs and their = specifications. I have practiced about 30 hours a week for the last 3.5 years on a large = 2 manual tracker with NO pistons too...It is similar to playing the = harpsichord in terms of manual technique-it is also similar in terms of registrational =   concepts-you don't change them much. ---who the hell is Virgil Fox to = accuse anyone of their performance style-i heard a recording of him playing the G =   major trio sonata on a cd last week and it sounded like it was from Snow White and the 7 Dwarfs. Anyway--the heck with all that...Tell me about Biggs? What was his personality like? Wow, what a neat experience for you!   --part1_17b.11c4b665.2b0a9905_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Tim- <BR>I am quite familiar with the sounds of those organs and their = specifications. &nbsp;I have practiced about 30 hours a week for the last = 3.5 years on a large 2 manual tracker with NO pistons too...It is similar = to playing the harpsichord in terms of manual technique-it is also similar = in terms of registrational concepts-you don't change them much. = &nbsp;---who the hell is Virgil Fox to accuse anyone of their performance = style-i heard a recording of him playing the G major trio sonata on a cd = last week and it sounded like it was from Snow White and the 7 Dwarfs. <BR>Anyway--the heck with all that...Tell me about Biggs? &nbsp;What was = his personality like? &nbsp;Wow, what a neat experience for = you!</FONT></HTML>   --part1_17b.11c4b665.2b0a9905_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Franck references From: "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 20:46:42 +0100 (CET)     Dear All, Could somebody give me the full references (the name of publisher and the date) of the following works:   M.L.Jaquet-Langlais, "Die Orgelwerke von Cesar Franck -Probleme der Uberlieferung und Interpretation"   Flor Peeters, "Die Orgelwerke Cesar Francks"   Regards,   Marek Miskowicz    
(back) Subject: Re: Of Biggs, Bach and Blockwerk(longish) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 14:59:59 EST     --part1_7b.26c4308.2b0aa0bf_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Arie etal:   I do think if old J.S. Bach were to have lived into the internet news era, he might have been discounted as to his playing methods. No one really knows how he handled the organ or other musical instruments except what he left behind to his students. This is sketchy at best. It would be my best guess that the instrument dictated how Bach played, his registrations, tempo, acoustics. Hopefully he put his pants on one leg at a time (gents) ladies best guess, just like we do. The individual instrument and environment dictate a lot of things. I seriously doubt any scholar will be able to ascertain definitively how Bach played ever. We only have his music, and a good lot of that disputed, some in his own hand, some in Krebs hand and others as well. Mendelssohn rediscovered the tip of the iceberg. People who are so sure about the stops he used, written papers on the subject, the types of fingerings and pedal work are only best guesses. Is all this REALLY necessary? Do we really have to recreate what we think a Bach organ looked and played like, reproducing what MAY have been in the specification? Or do we take a more practical approach, and just enjoy interpretating his work to the best of our own knowledge and technique? I think we've walked in so much quicksand, with one fad or another trying to recreate the past that we have very little idea of. People jumping on and off band- wagons. Producing hash sounding organs because we refuse to bow to the last and most important altar, temperment of the scale. We have developed absolute camps of playing his music, and everybody else is wrong elitism. Can't play that piece, because so and so big shot who really knows says Bach didn't write it. I say, if you like the piece and Bach's name is on it accept it, and give the old boy the benefit of the doubt. IMHO musical playing is far more important, than sitting by with elitest nit picking academia. Enjoy recreating Bach's music! Use your head, ears, and what ever other critcal thing you can think of to make music, but make music, for God's sake.   Ron Severin   --part1_7b.26c4308.2b0aa0bf_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear Arie etal:<BR> <BR> I do think if old J.S. Bach were to have lived into the internet news<BR> era, he might have been discounted as to his playing methods.<BR> No one really knows how he handled the organ or other musical<BR> instruments except what he left behind to his students. This is<BR> sketchy at best. It would be my best guess that the instrument<BR> dictated how Bach played, his registrations, tempo, acoustics.<BR> Hopefully he put his pants on one leg at a time (gents) ladies<BR> best guess, just like we do. The individual instrument and <BR> environment dictate a lot of things. I seriously doubt any scholar<BR> will be able to ascertain definitively how Bach played ever. We <BR> only have his music, and a good lot of that disputed, some in his<BR> own hand, some in Krebs hand and others as well. Mendelssohn<BR> rediscovered the tip of the iceberg. People who are so sure about<BR> the stops he used, written papers on the subject, the types of = fingerings<BR> and pedal work are only best guesses. Is all this REALLY necessary?<BR> Do we really have to recreate what we think a Bach organ looked and<BR> played like, reproducing what MAY have been in the specification?<BR> Or do we take a more practical approach, and just enjoy interpretating<BR> his work to the best of our own knowledge and technique? I think we've<BR> walked in so much quicksand, with one fad or another trying to = recreate<BR> the past that we have very little idea of. People jumping on and off = band-<BR> wagons. Producing hash sounding organs because we refuse to bow<BR> to the last and most important altar, temperment of the scale. We have<BR> developed absolute camps of playing his music, and everybody else<BR> is wrong elitism. Can't play that piece, because so and so big shot<BR> who really knows says Bach didn't write it. I say, if you like the = piece<BR> and Bach's name is on it accept it, and give the old boy the benefit<BR> of the doubt. IMHO musical playing is far more important, than sitting<BR> by with elitest nit picking academia. Enjoy recreating Bach's music!<BR> Use your head, ears, and what ever other critcal thing you can think<BR> of to make music, but make music, for God's sake.<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_7b.26c4308.2b0aa0bf_boundary--