PipeChat Digest #3247 - Tuesday, November 19, 2002
 
[NOT SO LONG] A Pilgrimage, part 3 and end
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Searching for a piano for an A.M.E. Church X-posted
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
suggestions requested??
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@stpetersrwc.org>
Re: Searching for a piano for an A.M.E. Church X-posted
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Words
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Recital Programmes
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Evensong with Noack, Opus 111, 1989 - 11/3/02
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
RE: Words
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@prodigy.net>
Re: Upcoming Handel's MESSIAH Performances (X-Posted)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Evensong with Noack, Opus 111
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: [NOT SO LONG] A Pilgrimage, part 3 and end From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 17:48:15 -0600   A PILGRIMAGE TO HOTLANTA   Part Three of Three     No, we did not find a great pub and get plastered. In fact, I had a total of 2 beers (yes, officer, ONLY two beers, and I normally drive aggressively) the entire weekend. However, on with our story.   Sunday night and Monday morning found the horizon bleak and rainy, with forecasts of rain and storms over our entire path homeward. However, our greatest stop on the trip was yet to come.   After packing and checking out of our home away from home, we headed south on I-75 to Clayton State College/University. I had made arrangements with Robert Serredell to see and hear the great Ruffatti at Spivey Hall. Although informed of the wonderful acoustics in the hall, I was not prepared for the sight of this gorgeous gem of an organ. Although Serredell was not present, his young assistant whose name escapes me was ever so helpful, providing us with a plethora of written material, giving us a tour of the organ, making sure all was hooked up, having the acoustical curtains drawn so that we had the maximum 3 seconds' reverberation time, and letting us loose.   I fell immediately in love with the 3-manual, 79-rank Albert Schweitzer Memorial Organ and its surroundings (can I have a hall like this for my own, daddy?). There was not a bad seat in the small hall; the music washed over one equally well in one seat as in another as I walked around listening to my friend, who played Langlais, Bach and Dale Wood with equal aplomb. The organ facade was made to resemble fine Italian marble, and took front and center stage. The acoustics were adjustable through the use of curtains in the gallery section of the hall.   We spent a couple hours at the console, exploring the various sounds and reveling in the beauty of the sound and sight of the instrument, before finally tearing ourselves away. On the way out we were met by Sherryl Nelson, Executive Director of the hall.   The facility was almost completely out of organ CDs, but I managed to obtain one by the resident organist, Richard Morris, performing organ masterpieces from France and Germany at the Rodgers pipe organ (V/194) found at Second Baptist Church, Houston, Texas(1988, R&R Records produced by Robert Serredell). Despite my initial misgivings about the organ, this was a fantastic recording or a damn-near perfect recital program:   Choral-Improvisation sur le "Victimae Paschali" - Tournemire Prelude and Fugue in E Minor ("Wedge") - Bach Trio on "Allein Gott in der Hoeh' sei Ehr" - Bach Cortege et Litanie - Dupre Naiades - Vierne Clair de lune - Vierne Toccata - Vierne Sonata on the Ninety-fourth Psalm - Reubke   This programme could easily become a "favorite" as recently requested by a list member. I have enjoyed it more than probably any CD in my now-extensive collection.   Our organ odyssey concluded, we turned our attention to driving home in the bad weather. Just before we reached Montgomery, I received a call from my husband Rick that Malcolm had called. Dialing up Malcolm, I discovered that he had left his laptop in my car the day before. After some discussion, we decided that I would fed-ex it to him. Several temptations presented themselves: I had always wanted a laptop; I now possessed all Malcolm's business secrets; I could rush home and write about Peachtree before him. However, my mother's Jewish-Baptist voice floated through my conscience, and I mailed it back to him untouched.   Our last hour of driving was through terribly heavy rain, and one mile from my house my friend's truck broke down. He managed to make it back to my house in the storm, and we ended up calling him a wrecker to tow his truck to Crestview for him.   Herein endeth the odyssey, until the next one comes along.   Regards,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Searching for a piano for an A.M.E. Church X-posted From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 18:25:25 -0600   Dear friends,   I just received a telephone call from a contact at a small A.M.E. Church that I re-built an instrument for a couple of years ago.   They've now asked me to "be on the lookout" for a better piano for their Sanctuary. They currently have a nice console piano and it needs to go into the Fellowship Hall to replace a not nice (read: JUNK!) Lester spinet piano that needs to be used for landfill.   Anyone have information about a second-hand grand that they're interested in selling within a reasonable distance of central Illinois? While these folks are willing to spend a reasonable amount for a piano, they aren't interested in something in the tens of thousands of dollars range, either.   Any information and leads would be gratefully appreciated. If there's a Piano trader list to look at, I'd also be appreciative of information regarding that to paruse.   Thank you.   Faithfully, -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: suggestions requested?? From: "Randy Terry" <randy@stpetersrwc.org> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 17:26:13 -0800   Hi Everyone!   I am coming up on a day I have looked forward to for some time. Sunday, Nov. 24th will be my last service as an active church musician. I plan on enjoying singing for a change, hearing the organ I have worked so hard to create over the past two years played by someone else, and taking advantage of Sunday opportunities that I haven't had time for before. I am thrilled that one of the faculty music teachers at the Grace Cathedral Choir School will begin playing on December 1 on an interim basis through Christmas while we conduct one other interview before making a permanent appointment. We haven't advertised so we've been very pleased that things are working out so smoothly. I'll continue to play as needed, and have been asked to continue my work with the instruments, which I am delighted to continue doing.   I have always loved service playing - and never thought I'd tire of it, but for some time I have wanted to shift my focus to my solo playing. For the rededication of the organ about 6 weeks ago I played (for the extended prelude) the following:   Adagio (from a Voluntary) - John Bennett (English Baroque) Fantasia & Fugue in g Minor - Bach Pastorale in F Major - Bach Arabesque (24 Pieces) - Vierne   Ragazzi, the Peninsula boys and young mens choir is in residence at St. Peter's along with their school and offices, and they sang the service - there were two psalms, which they perfermed (settings from the wonderful Bernstien cycle,) which was heaven. The offertory was by a contemporary British composer, quite good but I don't remember the composer of title. The communion anthem was Panis Angelicus, requested by the music committee. I played the Vierne Berceuse following that.   Following the final hymn, the altar party sat back down and so did everyone else and I played the Mulet Carillon-Sortie. I was pleased with my playing. I had done the big Bach in college, but I think I was more up to it this time.   I am beginning to plan a full recital program, and I may re-use the Bach pieces and the Mulet Carillon. But I have been looking at the familiar G Major P & F and the D Major with the pedal scales at the beginning.   For new pieces I am thinking about the John Cook Fanfare (open with) and the Choral by Joseph Jongen, In Paradisum by Daniel-Lesur, and either "A Clarinet Tune" by Harrison Oxley which is a delightfully playful piece or perhaps the "Irish Air from County Derry" arranged by Lemare which I found among my stacks of inherited music.   If I decide to market this to the church congregation, I will probably include some contemporary hymn-tune preludes.   I'd be interested in seeing programs you all have played or hearing suggestions as to how to arrange the literature above, what to add/leave out, etc. Private emails are welcome. My long range plan is to have a program that can be done at several locations with minor substitutions. I've been asked to play a program in my home town, and am discussing a concert "swap" with several friends around the country. I appreciate your input.     -- Randy Terry, Curator of Musical Instruments & Assisting Organist   The Episcopal Church of St. Peter 178 Clinton Street Redwood City, CA 94062  
(back) Subject: Re: Searching for a piano for an A.M.E. Church X-posted From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 20:35:17 EST     --part1_178.12094850.2b0c40d5_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   try looking on ebay and reading the chicago trib and sun times classifieds =   and the trading times.   --part1_178.12094850.2b0c40d5_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>try looking on ebay and = reading the chicago trib and sun times classifieds and the trading times. = </FONT></HTML>   --part1_178.12094850.2b0c40d5_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Words From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 21:09:47 EST     --part1_1ba.9b2babb.2b0c48eb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Keith, Having studied jazz too, I actually did play b3 in Chicago nightclubs regularly in a trio with a guitarist and drummer! i still keep it up from =   time to time too! people don't listen there either. so ha! You must really hate me now! You certainly understand that I make many of = my nasty comments in the heat of the moment-usually right after church, or = right after I get my check from church. I am rather upset by where society is headed in terms of its musical and artistic taste. Having two parents = that are full-time professional musicians, and being a music major in college, = I know how mentally agonizing studying and performing fine arts is. I also understand that universities are microcosms of the real world. I spend my =   nights and weekends in the practice room, while others (who will be parishoners at church or concert goers or cd buyers within the next 5 = years) are out drinking and expolring other "innovative" situations, watching MTV =   and listening to Snoop Dog. Earning a music degree in college has more credit and time requirements than any other major. We have to take = classes in math, economics, business, etc..in addition to practicing 30-40 hours = per week and dealing with insane theory and history professors. With the = amount of time we put in, we should have a bachelors and masters in 4 years. Business majors hardly ever have to use their brains, let alone take more than one art appreciation class! As a business major, you can go to class = a few hours a day, do an hour of homework, not really have to think too hard = at all about anything, earn A's, and graduate to earn 50 or 60 thousand off = the bat. I know this because my best friend is a business major. It is disheartening to dedicate so many long hard hours to a postlude and to go unaprecciated morally and financially or feel "upstaged" at church by = someone who probably works less than an hour a week at their instrument. Don't = get me wrong, I complain a lot and hope for better situations for all of us, = but I really love playing the organ, and can't see myself doing anything else. = SOOOOOOO.............................. Go ahead and find something else to argue with me about now! I am really enjoying your condescension and argumentative nature! Cordially, Gregory the Bitter :)   --part1_1ba.9b2babb.2b0c48eb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Keith, <BR>Having studied jazz too, I actually did play b3 in Chicago nightclubs = regularly in a trio with a guitarist and drummer! &nbsp;i still keep it up = from time to time too! &nbsp;people don't listen there either. &nbsp;so = ha! <BR>You must really hate me now! &nbsp;You certainly understand that I = make many of my nasty comments in the heat of the moment-usually right = after church, or right after I get my check from church. &nbsp;I am rather = upset by where society is headed in terms of its musical and artistic = taste. &nbsp;Having two parents that are full-time professional musicians, = and being a music major in college, I know how mentally agonizing studying = and performing fine arts is. &nbsp;I also understand that universities are = microcosms of the real world. &nbsp;I spend my nights and weekends in the = practice room, while others (who will be parishoners at church or concert = goers or cd buyers within the next 5 years) are out drinking and expolring = other "innovative" situations, watching MTV and listening to Snoop Dog. = &nbsp;Earning a music degree in college has more credit and time = requirements than any other major. &nbsp;We have to take classes in math, = economics, business, etc..in addition to practicing 30 <BR>Go ahead and find something else to argue with me about now! &nbsp;I = am really enjoying your condescension and argumentative nature! <BR>Cordially, <BR>Gregory the Bitter :)</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1ba.9b2babb.2b0c48eb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Recital Programmes From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 20:15:48 -0600   Given Colin's perquisites for the recital, some things I would NOT want to hear at a recital include the Widor Toccata, the JSB Toccata in d minor, "Jesu, joy . . ." , "Sheep may safely . . ." or "Bist du bei mir" (or whatever it is), or any of the Boellman Suite Gothique. However, some pieces I would really want to hear (and this is not exhaustive or in order, only what I am loving this week):   "Fry 'em all and let God sort 'em out" big/loud: JSB P&F in e minor ("Wedge") - the quintessential Bach Liszt B-A-C-H JSB In dir est freud - the best of the Orgebuchlein Mendelssohn Sonata No. 3 in A Vierne Finale from Symphonie No. 1 - it always makes me happy   Moderate/softer/tinkly pieces or ones that vary in volume: Durufle Scherzo JSB "Allein Gott in . . . " Vierne Naiades Vierne Clair de lune Dupre Cortege et Litanie Bolcom "What a Friend" or "How firm a Foundation"   Ensembles: Durufle Suite, op. 5 Pierne 3 pieces   Bigger (i.e., longer) pieces: Liszt Ad nos Reubke Sonata on the Ninety-fourth Psalm   I believe a program should always start with a strong piece of not longer than 5 minutes. It should end pretty much the same way. It shouldn't last more than 60 minutes without intermission, or 90 minutes with an intermission, if lay people will be in the audience. No matter how enraptured, some of us grow stiff and lame if sitting too long.   My tastes in organ music started out all baroque, and I have evolved into the Romantic and French-guy stuff. However, this past week I have really opened up to Dupre, Durufle and Tournemire. One's tastes can change - I went from screwdrivers and rum and coke, to bourbon sours, to White Russians, to martinis, to cognac, to Bailey's, to fine water.   Always grateful to share,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Evensong with Noack, Opus 111, 1989 - 11/3/02 From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 20:46:27 -0600   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> To: "Pipe Chat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>; "Pipe Organ List" <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Tuesday, November 19, 2002 12:49 AM Subject: Evensong with Noack, Opus 111, 1989 - 11/3/02     > Evensong with Noack, Opus 111, 1989 - 11/3/02 > > Along with many others, I heard Opus 111 at the OHS Boston Convention a few > summers ago. I came away with a headache, even though I was sitting on = the > wrong side of the nave to hear the instrument more-or-less directly. I = was > on the south side, and the Organ speaks northward into the chancel. > Listmember Bruce Cornely, who is no fan of harsh-sounding instruments, took > me to task for my publically expressed discomfort, pointing out that he was > in the death seat, in the chancel, facing south, looking directly at the > Organ case, and found the sound not at all offensive. This is what = maketh > the Organ world go around, but when my Australian friend, Michael S. Murray, > found himself installed as Organist and Choirmaster a bit over a year = ago, > he urged me to give the Organ a second chance. On a somewhat trippy weekend, > I, having driven to Saratoga Springs to hear Felix Hell on the Friday > evening, undaunted, took off for Church of the Redeemer, Chestnut Hill, > Boston for a Rite 1 Evensong "within the octave of All Saints'". This time, > at Redeemer of course, the Organ, well, redeemed itself for me. You can find > it at: http://www.noackorgan.com/   I was present at the OHS recital, and my opinion of it was rather similar = to Malcolm's, although mitigated by talking to Fritz Noack afterwards and discovering that he was very upset by the way his instrument had been played. In particular it is unfortunate that the recitalist limited = herself to a very narrow early music repertoire, which tended to leave the impression that the instrument was capable of nothing else. I wished I could have heard some Mendelssohn, Vierne, etc., played on it.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: RE: Words From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@prodigy.net> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 20:58:10 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_003E_01C2900E.5E33F340 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Earning a music degree in college has more credit and time requirements = than any other major. We have to take classes in math, economics, business, etc..in addition to pr! acticing 30 Go ahead and find something else to argue with me about now! I am really enjoying your condescension and argumentative nature! Cordially, Gregory the Bitter :)   I applaud the time you spend practicing and studying. What I read was = that Keith was referring to was your lack of spiritual concern for the congregation. I don't care how many hours are spent, nor do I care how = GOOD the organist is, those people are there to worship their LORD, not YOU. = The sooner that's realized, the happier you will be. I do not care how many people talk during my prelude, nor do I care if people leave before the final note of the postlude. I'm there to serve GOD and THEM. My personal joy comes from when I play well, or even not so well, because I love it. = I love playing for church. I'll play for a worship service LONG before I'll do a recital because I can relax, enjoy it, and praise Him who gave me = this talent in the first place. It amuses me when people talk about how the crank up the crescendo in order to cover up the people talking. And I can tell you what they're thinking...."what's the problem with THAT guy?" = Heck, in the church I play for, the prelude is the signal that people need to = quit talking in the narthex and come into the church to prepare for worship. = So that means 1/2 of them only hear the last 1/2 of it. Do I care? Not at all.   As far as being condescending, I don't think what Keith said was condescending at all. What he said was right on the money. If you're in church work for your glory or for want of accolades, think twice before doing this. It takes a sense of ministry to lead a music worship program. And before you get ready to fire off a hot retort to me, I've been playing in church for 20 years...which is long before you even knew what the organ even was. I've also been leading music programs for the last 13 as the director of music. Humble yourself now, because congregations don't like = to hire those who look down their noses....the field may be stretched thin, = but those of us who present ourselves well to the search commitees, who have a sense of ministry as opposed to a "listen to how good I am" are the ones = who will get the jobs....and very often, it won't matter if I can play the hardest piece in the world in 12 keys and from memory.   Greg, if you're in college, you're too young to be bitter, and sure, ok, = you may be joking around, but people remember stuff, and it can come back to bite you in the hindquarters. If you don't like the "congregational environment", consider concertizing. Then you have a right to expect silence and the people to listen. Service in the Lord's church can be rewarding...I hope that you can find those rewards, and let go of this little stuff. Heck....if they don't hear the prelude, spice up the hymn introductions....they WILL hear those. :-)   Kind regards, Jeff   ------=3D_NextPart_000_003E_01C2900E.5E33F340 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dus-ascii"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4728.2300" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial><FONT size=3D3D2>Earning a music degree in = college =3D has more=3D20 credit and time requirements than any other major. &nbsp;We have to take = =3D classes=3D20 in math, economics, business, etc..in addition to pr! acticing 30 <BR>Go = =3D ahead=3D20 and find something else to argue with me about now! &nbsp;I am really =3D enjoying=3D20 your condescension and argumentative nature! <BR>Cordially, <BR>Gregory = =3D the=3D20 Bitter :)</FONT>&nbsp;<SPAN class=3D3D040584502-20112002><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff=3D20 size=3D3D2>&nbsp;</FONT></SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial><SPAN =3D class=3D3D040584502-20112002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial><SPAN class=3D3D040584502-20112002><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff=3D20 size=3D3D2>I applaud the time you spend practicing and studying.&nbsp; =3D What I read=3D20 was that Keith&nbsp;was referring to was your lack of spiritual concern = =3D for the=3D20 congregation.&nbsp; I don't care how many hours are spent, nor do I care = =3D how=3D20 GOOD the organist is, those people are there to worship their LORD, = not=3D20 YOU.&nbsp; The sooner that's realized, the happier you will be.&nbsp; I = =3D do not=3D20 care how many people talk during my prelude, nor do I care if people =3D leave=3D20 before the final note of&nbsp;the postlude.&nbsp; I'm there to =3D serve&nbsp;GOD=3D20 and THEM.&nbsp; My personal joy comes from when I play well, or even not = =3D so=3D20 well, because I love it.&nbsp; I love playing for church.&nbsp; I'll =3D play for a=3D20 worship&nbsp;service LONG before I'll do a recital because I can relax, = =3D enjoy=3D20 it, and praise&nbsp;Him&nbsp;who gave me this talent in the first =3D place.&nbsp;=3D20 It amuses me when people talk about how the crank up the crescendo in =3D order to=3D20 cover up the people talking.&nbsp; And I can tell you what they're=3D20 thinking...."what's the problem with THAT guy?"&nbsp; Heck, in the =3D church I play=3D20 for, the prelude is the signal that people need to quit talking in the =3D narthex=3D20 and come into the church to prepare for worship.&nbsp; So that means 1/2 = =3D of them=3D20 only hear the last 1/2 of it.&nbsp; Do I care?&nbsp; Not at=3D20 all.</FONT></SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial><SPAN =3D class=3D3D040584502-20112002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial><SPAN class=3D3D040584502-20112002><FONT =3D color=3D3D#0000ff=3D20 size=3D3D2>As far as being condescending, I don't think what =3D Keith&nbsp;said was=3D20 condescending at all.&nbsp; What he said was right on the money.&nbsp; =3D If you're=3D20 in church work for your glory or for want of accolades, think twice =3D before doing=3D20 this.&nbsp; It&nbsp;takes a sense of ministry to lead a music worship=3D20 program.&nbsp; And before you get ready to fire off a hot retort to = me,=3D20 I've&nbsp;been playing in church for 20 years...which is long before you = =3D even=3D20 knew what&nbsp;the&nbsp;organ even was.&nbsp; I've also been leading =3D music=3D20 programs for the last 13 as the director of music.&nbsp; Humble yourself = =3D now,=3D20 because congregations don't like to hire those who look down their =3D noses....the=3D20 field&nbsp;may be stretched thin, but those of&nbsp;us = who&nbsp;present=3D20 ourselves well to the search commitees, who have a sense of ministry as = =3D opposed=3D20 to&nbsp;a "listen to how good I am" are the ones who will = get&nbsp;the=3D20 jobs....and very often, it won't matter if I can play the&nbsp;hardest =3D piece in=3D20 the world in 12 keys and from memory.</FONT></SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#0000ff size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D040584502-20112002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#0000ff size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D040584502-20112002>Greg,=3D20 if you're in college, you're too young to be bitter, and sure, ok, you =3D may be=3D20 joking around, but people remember stuff, and it can come back to bite =3D you in=3D20 the hindquarters.&nbsp; If you don't like the "congregational =3D environment",=3D20 consider concertizing.&nbsp; Then you have a right to expect silence and = =3D the=3D20 people to listen.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Service in the Lord's church can = be=3D20 rewarding...I hope that you can find those rewards, and let go of this =3D little=3D20 stuff.&nbsp; Heck....if they don't hear the prelude, spice up the = hymn=3D20 introductions....they WILL hear those.&nbsp; :-)</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#0000ff size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D040584502-20112002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#0000ff size=3D3D2><SPAN =3D class=3D3D040584502-20112002>Kind=3D20 regards,</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#0000ff size=3D3D2><SPAN=3D20 class=3D3D040584502-20112002>Jeff</SPAN></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_003E_01C2900E.5E33F340--    
(back) Subject: Re: Upcoming Handel's MESSIAH Performances (X-Posted) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 21:02:05 -0600   ---- Original Message ----- From: "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, November 19, 2002 11:00 AM Subject: Re: Upcoming Handel's MESSIAH Performances (X-Posted)     > > Richard Schneider> In that case, I certainly wish you were closer to us then Australia! > > Wash your mouth out - he's in New Zealand (with the sheep <VBG>)!   They have sheep in Australia too. They were originally imported from Vermont to keep the kangaroos company.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Evensong with Noack, Opus 111 From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2002 22:23:02 EST   True, Fritz was very concerned (to put it gently) about the way his instrument was played and presented. It is not the first time I have heard = a builder say, "That's not the instrument I built and voiced" during a = concert. At another convention, a very well-known concert organist, invited by another organbuilder (she was a friend of his), also "tonally = misrepresented" the instrument. He felt helpless as she zipped away with the octave = couplers stuck in the "on" position. There is a direct correlation between literature and registration, = which is why organbuilders are so adamant that organists learn more about the history and design of the instruments they play, and the music for which = they were built. Many people walk away from organ recitals with bad impressions = of instruments that are probably much better specimens than the way they were =   played. When I read the statements of anger and rage regarding the "snobbery" = of musicians and craftsmen, I would rather people think about why builders = and scholars are searching for the artistic truth. We're not necessarily = talking about "historical accuracy," but the taste and common sense and ability to =   LISTEN, which LEADS to an aesthetically comforting PICTURE of = authenticity. The word "ignorance" has been bandied about on the organ chat lists lately, and I really think we're all smarter than that. But ignorance CAN be WILLFUL, because delving into details takes work, =   and a great deal of it, to approach a glimpse of understanding. Sometimes = it is easier to "make do" with an edition that is known to be inaccurate, to continue to play a bad organ or suffer resentfully with an imitation, just =   because it doesn't ruffle feathers or deplete one's energy. But it does. Bigtime. So continue to learn and explore, register with your ears, and read, read, read, and oh yes, LISTEN. Sebastian M. Gluck New York City