PipeChat Digest #3257 - Sunday, November 24, 2002
 
The Innkeeper - a minor key Christmas
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3256 - 11/24/02 St John's Holland Road
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Re: a young man's lament
  by "Ray Ahrens" <Ray_Ahrens@msn.com>
Re: Turntables (off topic)
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: JW Steere organ
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
The Articulate Acoustic at Slee Hall
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: The Innkeeper - a minor key Christmas From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2002 14:23:20 EST     --part1_aa.1575c596.2b128128_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   List,   The following is the little tale by John Piper that I mentioned in my=3D20 previous posting. It sounds like an Easter tale, but it might help = explain=3D20 the "minor or modal" music of Christmas. I first heard it while listening = t=3D o=3D20 Elizabeth Elliot's "Gateway to Joy" on the radio a few Christmasses ago. = =3D20 Following is the transcript of the show.   Hope it touches you. ------------------------------ Elizabeth Elliot: "So brave, oh Rachel was so brave. Her hands were like = a=3D20 thousand iron bands around the boy. She wouldn't let him go, and so her = own=3D =3D20 back met with every thrust and blow. I lost my arm, my wife, my sons-- = the=3D20 cost for housing the Messiah here."   Lisa Barry: That's just one small portion of a powerful story you're = about=3D20 to hear on Gateway To Joy today. The tale written by John Piper = isn't=3D20 founded in Scripture, but it's an imagining of what could hav happened....   The Innkeeper - by John Piper   "Jake's wife would have been 58 the day that Jesus passed the gate of=3D20 Bethlehem and slowly walked towards Jacob's inn. The people talked = with=3D20 friends, and children played along the paths, and Jesus hummed a song = and=3D20 smiled at every child He saw. He paused with one small lass to draw a = camel=3D20 in the dirt. Then said,=3D20 'What's this?' The girl bent down her head to study what the Lord had = made.=3D20 She smiled. 'A camel, sir,' and laid her finger on the bulging back = where=3D20 merchants bind their leather pack. 'It's got a hump.'   "'Indeed it does. And who do you believe it was who made this camel with = his=3D =3D20 hump?'=3D20   "Without a thought that this would stump the rabbi guild and be reviled, = she=3D =3D20 said, 'God did.' And Jesus smiled. 'Good eyes, my child. And would that = all=3D20 Jerusalem within that wall of yonder stone could see the signs of = peace.'=3D20   "He left the lass with lines of simple wonder in her face and slowly went = to=3D =3D20 find the place where He was born.   "Folks said the inn had never been a place for sin. For Jacob was a holy = man=3D ..=3D20 (Jacob is the innkeeper). And he and Rachel had a plan to marry, have a = chil=3D d=3D20 or two, and serve the folks who traveled through--especially the poor = who=3D20 brought their meal and turtledoves, and sought a place to stay near = Zion's=3D20 gate. They'd rise up early, stay up late to help the pilgrims go and = come.=3D20   "When the place was full to some, especially the poorest, they would = say,=3D20 'We're sorry there's no room but stay now, if you like, out back. = There's=3D20 lots of hay and we have extra cots that you can use. They'll be no = charge.=3D20 The stable isn't very large, but Noah--that's the dog--keeps it safe.' He = wa=3D s=3D20 a wedding gift to Jake because the shepherds knew he loved the dog. = 'There's=3D =3D20 nothing in the Decalogue,' he used to joke, 'that says a man can't love = a=3D20 dog.'   "The children ran ahead of Jesus as he strode toward Jacob's inn. The = stony=3D20 road that led up to the inn was deep with centuries of wear and steep at = one=3D =3D20 point just before the door. The Lord knocked once, then twice before he = hear=3D d=3D20 an old man's voice, 'Around back,' it called. So Jesus took the track = that=3D20 led around the inn.   "The old man leaned back in his chair and told the dog to never mind. = 'I've=3D20 had no one to tend the door, my lad, for thirty years. I'm sorry to = the=3D20 inconvenience to your sore feet. The road to Jerusalem is hard, ain't = it?=3D20 Don't mind old Shem; he's harmless like his dad. Won't bite a Roman = soldier=3D20 in the night. Sit down.' And Jacob waved the stump of his right arm.   "'We're in a slump right now; got lots of time to think and talk. Come, = sit=3D20 and have a drink from Jacob's well,' he laughed. 'You own the inn?' the = Lord=3D =3D20 required. 'On loan, you'd better say. God owns the inn.' At that the = Lord=3D20 knew they were kin and ventured on.   "'Do you recall the tax when Caesar said to all the world that each must be=3D20 enrolled?' Old Jacob winced. 'Are north winds cold? Are deserts dry? = Do=3D20 fishes swim, and ravens fly? I do. A grim and awful year it was for me = when=3D20 God ordained that strange decree. How could I such a time forget! Why do = you=3D =3D20 ask?'   "'I have a debt to pay, and I must see how much. Why do you say that it = was=3D20 such a grim and awful year?'   "He raised the stump of his right arm. 'So dazed, young man, I didn't = know=3D20 I'd lost my arm. Do you know what it cost for me to house the Son of = God?'=3D20 The old man took his cedar rod and swept it around the place. 'Empty = for=3D20 thirty years, alone; you see? Old Jacob, poor old Jacob runs it with one = arm=3D ,=3D20 a dog, no sons. But I had sons=3DE2=3D80=3DA6once. Joseph was my first = born. He wa=3D s small=3D20 because his mother was so sick. When he turned three the Lord was good to = me=3D =3D20 and Rachel, and our baby Ben was born, the very fortnight when the = blessed=3D20 family arrived. And Rachel's gracious heart contrived a way for them to = stay=3D =3D20 there in that very stall. The man was thin and tired. You look a lot = like=3D20 him.'   "But Jesus said, 'Why was it grim?'=3D20   "'We got a reputation here that night. Nothing at all to fear in that, = we=3D20 thought; it was of God. But in one year the slaughter squad from Herod = came.=3D =3D20 Where do you suppose they started? Not a clue; we didn't have a clue = what=3D20 they had come to do. No time to pray. No time to run. No time to get = poor=3D20 Joseph off the street and let him say goodbye to Ben or me or Rachel. = Only=3D20 time to see a lifted spear smash through his spine and chest. He stumbled = to=3D =3D20 the sign that welcomes strangers to the place and looked with panic at = my=3D20 face, as if to ask what he had done. Young man, you ever lost a son?'=3D20   "The tears streamed down the Savior's cheek. He shook his head, but = couldn't=3D =3D20 speak.=3D20   "'Before I found the breath to scream, I heard the words, a horrid = dream.'=3D20 'Kill every child who's two or less. Spare not for ought, nor make = excess.=3D20 Let this one be the oldest here, and if you count your own life dear, = let=3D20 none escape.'   "'I had no sword, no weapons in my house. But, Lord, I had my hands, and = I=3D20 would save the son of my right hand. So brave, oh Rachel was so brave. = Her=3D20 hands were like a thousand iron bands around the boy. She wouldn't let = him=3D20 go, and so her own back met with every thrust and blow. I lost my arm, = my=3D20 wife, my sons--the cost for housing the Messiah here. Why would he = simply=3D20 disappear and never come to help?'   "They sat in silence. Jacob wondered at the stranger's tears. 'I am the = boy=3D20 that Herod wanted to destroy. You gave my parents room to give me life, = and=3D20 then God let me live and took your wife. Ask me not why the one should = live=3D20 another die. God's ways are high, and you will know in time. But I have = come=3D =3D20 to show you what the Lord prepared the night you made a place for = heaven's=3D20 light. In two weeks they will crucify my flesh. But mark this, Jacob. I = will=3D =3D20 rise in three days from the dead and place my foot upon the head of him = who=3D20 has the power of death. And I will raise, with life and breath, your wife = an=3D d=3D20 Ben and Joseph too. And give them back, Jacob, back to you with = everything=3D20 the world can store. And you will reign forevermore.' ------------------------------ What an imagination! It could be true, you know. Jesus, on his way to = th=3D e=3D20 crucifixion, might have stopped by in Bethlehem. He might have come upon = the=3D =3D20 very place where Mary had given Him birth. It might have been that the = old=3D20 innkeeper was still alive, and they had this conversation. What a marvelous, glorious ending. Jesus says to the innkeeper, "In = two=3D20 weeks they will crucify my flesh. But mark this, Jacob. I will rise in = three=3D =3D20 days from the dead and place my foot upon the head of him who has the = power=3D20 of death. And I will raise, with life and breath, your wife and Ben = and=3D20 Joseph too. And give them back, Jacob, back to you with everything the world=3D =3D20 can store. And you will reign forevermore." The Bible tells us that those of us who love Him are going to reign with = Him=3D ..=3D20 Merry Christmas!   --Written by John Piper   --part1_aa.1575c596.2b128128_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">List,<BR> <BR> The following is the little tale by John Piper that I mentioned in my = previo=3D us posting.&nbsp; It sounds like an Easter tale, but it might help explain = t=3D he "minor or modal" music of Christmas.&nbsp; I first heard it while = listeni=3D ng to Elizabeth Elliot's "Gateway to Joy" on the radio a few Christmasses = ag=3D o.&nbsp; Following is the transcript of the show.<BR> <BR> Hope it touches you.<BR> ------------------------------<BR> Elizabeth Elliot: "So brave, oh Rachel was so brave.&nbsp; Her hands were = li=3D ke a thousand iron bands around the boy.&nbsp; She wouldn't let him go, = and=3D20=3D so her own back met with every thrust and blow.&nbsp; I lost my arm, my = wife=3D , my sons-- the cost for housing the Messiah here."<BR> <BR> Lisa Barry:&nbsp; That's just one small portion of a powerful story you're = a=3D bout to hear on Gateway To Joy today.&nbsp; The tale written by John Piper = i=3D sn't founded in Scripture, but it's an imagining of what could hav = happened.=3D ....<BR> <BR> The Innkeeper - by John Piper<BR> <BR> "Jake's wife would have been 58 the day that Jesus passed the gate of = Bethle=3D hem and slowly walked towards Jacob's inn. The people talked with friends, = a=3D nd children played along the paths, and Jesus hummed a song and smiled at = ev=3D ery child He saw. He paused with one small lass to draw a camel in the = dirt.=3D Then said, <BR> 'What's this?' The girl bent down her head to study what the Lord had = made.=3D20=3D She smiled. 'A camel, sir,' and laid her finger on the bulging back where = me=3D rchants bind their leather pack. 'It's got a hump.'<BR> <BR> "'Indeed it does. And who do you believe it was who made this camel with = his=3D hump?' <BR> <BR> "Without a thought that this would stump the rabbi guild and be reviled, = she=3D said, 'God did.' And Jesus smiled. 'Good eyes, my child. And would that = all=3D Jerusalem within that wall of yonder stone could see the signs of peace.' = <=3D BR> <BR> "He left the lass with lines of simple wonder in her face and slowly went = to=3D find the place where He was born.<BR> <BR> "Folks said the inn had never been a place for sin. For Jacob was a holy = man=3D .. (Jacob is the innkeeper). And he and Rachel had a plan to marry, have a = ch=3D ild or two, and serve the folks who traveled through--especially the poor = wh=3D o brought their meal and turtledoves, and sought a place to stay near = Zion's=3D gate. They'd rise up early, stay up late to help the pilgrims go and = come.=3D20=3D <BR> <BR> "When the place was full to some, especially the poorest, they would say, = 'W=3D e're sorry there's no room but stay now, if you like, out back. There's = lots=3D of hay and we have extra cots that you can use. They'll be no charge. The = s=3D table isn't very large, but Noah--that's the dog--keeps it safe.' He was a = w=3D edding gift to Jake because the shepherds knew he loved the dog. 'There's = no=3D thing in the Decalogue,' he used to joke, 'that says a man can't love a = dog.=3D '<BR> <BR> "The children ran ahead of Jesus as he strode toward Jacob's inn. The = stony=3D20=3D road that led up to the inn was deep with centuries of wear and steep at = one=3D point just before the door. The Lord knocked once, then twice before he = hea=3D rd an old man's voice, 'Around back,' it called. So Jesus took the track = tha=3D t led around the inn.<BR> <BR> "The old man leaned back in his chair and told the dog to never mind. = 'I've=3D20=3D had no one to tend the door, my lad, for thirty years. I'm sorry to the = inco=3D nvenience to your sore feet. The road to Jerusalem is hard, ain't it? = Don't=3D20=3D mind old Shem; he's harmless like his dad. Won't bite a Roman soldier in the=3D night. Sit down.' And Jacob waved the stump of his right arm.<BR> <BR> "'We're in a slump right now; got lots of time to think and talk. Come, = sit=3D20=3D and have a drink from Jacob's well,' he laughed. 'You own the inn?' the = Lord=3D required. 'On loan, you'd better say. God owns the inn.' At that the Lord = k=3D new they were kin and ventured on.<BR> <BR> "'Do you recall the tax when Caesar said to all the world that each must = be=3D20=3D enrolled?' Old Jacob winced. 'Are north winds cold? Are deserts dry? Do = fish=3D es swim, and ravens fly? I do. A grim and awful year it was for me when = God=3D20=3D ordained that strange decree. How could I such a time forget! Why do you = ask=3D ?'<BR> <BR> "'I have a debt to pay, and I must see how much. Why do you say that it = was=3D20=3D such a grim and awful year?'<BR> <BR> "He raised the stump of his right arm. 'So dazed, young man, I didn't know = I=3D 'd lost my arm. Do you know what it cost for me to house the Son of God?' = Th=3D e old man took his cedar rod and swept it around the place. 'Empty for = thirt=3D y years, alone; you see? Old Jacob, poor old Jacob runs it with one arm, a = d=3D og, no sons. But I had sons=3DE2=3D80=3DA6once. Joseph was my first born. = He was s=3D mall because his mother was so sick. When he turned three the Lord was = good=3D20=3D to me and Rachel, and our baby Ben was born, the very fortnight when the = ble=3D ssed family arrived. And Rachel's gracious heart contrived a way for them = to=3D stay there in that very stall. The man was thin and tired. You look a lot = l=3D ike him.'<BR> <BR> "But Jesus said, 'Why was it grim?' <BR> <BR> "'We got a reputation here that night. Nothing at all to fear in that, we = th=3D ought; it was of God. But in one year the slaughter squad from Herod came. = W=3D here do you suppose they started? Not a clue; we didn't have a clue what = the=3D y had come to do. No time to pray. No time to run. No time to get poor = Josep=3D h off the street and let him say goodbye to Ben or me or Rachel. Only time = t=3D o see a lifted spear smash through his spine and chest. He stumbled to the = s=3D ign that welcomes strangers to the place and looked with panic at my face, = a=3D s if to ask what he had done. Young man, you ever lost a son?' <BR> <BR> "The tears streamed down the Savior's cheek. He shook his head, but = couldn't=3D speak. <BR> <BR> "'Before I found the breath to scream, I heard the words, a horrid dream.' = '=3D Kill every child who's two or less. Spare not for ought, nor make excess. = Le=3D t this one be the oldest here, and if you count your own life dear, let = none=3D escape.'<BR> <BR> "'I had no sword, no weapons in my house. But, Lord, I had my hands, and I = w=3D ould save the son of my right hand. So brave, oh Rachel was so brave. Her = ha=3D nds were like a thousand iron bands around the boy. She wouldn't let him = go,=3D and so her own back met with every thrust and blow. I lost my arm, my = wife,=3D my sons--the cost for housing the Messiah here. Why would he simply = disappe=3D ar and never come to help?'<BR> <BR> "They sat in silence. Jacob wondered at the stranger's tears. 'I am the = boy=3D20=3D that Herod wanted to destroy. You gave my parents room to give me life, = and=3D20=3D then God let me live and took your wife. Ask me not why the one should = live=3D20=3D another die. God's ways are high, and you will know in time. But I have = come=3D to show you what the Lord prepared the night you made a place for = heaven's=3D20=3D light. In two weeks they will crucify my flesh. But mark this, Jacob. I = will=3D rise in three days from the dead and place my foot upon the head of him = who=3D has the power of death. And I will raise, with life and breath, your wife = a=3D nd Ben and Joseph too. And give them back, Jacob, back to you with = everythin=3D g the world can store. And you will reign forevermore.'<BR> ------------------------------<BR> What an imagination! It could be true, you know. Jesus, on his way to = th=3D e crucifixion, might have stopped by in Bethlehem. He might have come upon = t=3D he very place where Mary had given Him birth. It might have been that the = ol=3D d innkeeper was still alive, and they had this conversation.<BR> What a marvelous, glorious ending. Jesus says to the innkeeper, "In = two=3D20=3D weeks they will crucify my flesh. But mark this, Jacob. I will rise in = three=3D days from the dead and place my foot upon the head of him who has the = power=3D of death. And I will raise, with life and breath, your wife and Ben and = Jos=3D eph too. And give them back, Jacob, back to you with everything the world = ca=3D n store. And you will reign forevermore."<BR> The Bible tells us that those of us who love Him are going to reign with = Him=3D .. Merry Christmas!<BR> <BR> --Written by John Piper</FONT></HTML>   --part1_aa.1575c596.2b128128_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3256 - 11/24/02 St John's Holland Road From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2002 21:54:57 +0200   Thank you Ross - I am glad you have been able to expand on your visits to England and that this was a rare negative experience. I don't entirely go along with your views on the role of the Anglican and Catholic Church - = nor am I an expert on canon law - though this is somewhat off topic. However most list members are involved with churches through the musical angle, so it is related. Music is obviously an important aspect of worship. The organist is there to assist in the creation of this atmosphere, just as = the congregation and priest are. I don't think the organ is primarily there = for the organist to show off his talents at the end of the service, nor to = drown out the congregation's off key singing. Well chosen music can and does complement the message for any given occasion. Put into a broader context perhaps we should have a "Good Church Guide" along the lines of the good food guide, with stars for music, sermons, atmosphere and so on. Of = course, circumstances do change from time to time. Many years ago Healey Willan = was organist at St John's Holland Road, and I imagine in those days it was a thriving parish with a full congregation each and every Sunday. I agree = that politeness is desirable and a warm and friendly welcome from any church is important, and like you, I have usually been well received in any church I have visited. But Alan taylor speaks warmly of the welcome he received at = St John's, so perhaps you were unlucky and hit a bad day. www.johnfoss.gr  
(back) Subject: Re: a young man's lament From: "Ray Ahrens" <Ray_Ahrens@msn.com> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2002 13:45:47 -0600   Paul,     Please contact me off list. I might be able to help you.   Ray     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Tiseo, Paul (PSC)" <Paul.Tiseo@vw.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, November 22, 2002 4:13 PM Subject: a young man's lament     > Hello friends: > > I am a 25 year old Catholic man from the Detroit area and a wannabe > organist. I did not become interested in playing the organ until I was = 22, > when I enrolled in the diocesan seminary. The music director there was = an > inspiring woman named Dr. Deborah Friauff. She exposed me to some great > composers like Messiaen and Tournemire.  
(back) Subject: Re: Turntables (off topic) From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2002 14:19:23 -0600   Hi, Josh --   As Mike and Rich have already mentioned, you'll need a thing called a "phono preamplifier" to get the turntable to work with the AUX input jacks =   on your living room stereo (unless it actually *does* have an input = labeled "phono" that you just didn't see at first...?)   Such a preamplifier needn't be anything elaborate at all -- I think Radio Shack sells a suitable unit that is basically just a little metal box with =   jacks for the TT cable to plug into it, a cable to plug it into the amp jacks, and a power cord -- just put it in between the TT and the amplifier =   and forget about it! Seems like those things are pretty cheap too. (cost-wise, I mean -- less than $20, mebbe?)   One way or the other, now that you have learned to operate the turntable, <g> it'll probably work just fine if you use the other system (the one it came with, that is). Good luck!!   Tim (who suddenly feels very old, with the realization that there really ARE people out in the world now that have never used a record player.....! = <big groan>)   At 12:19 AM 11/24/2002 -0500, Josh wrote: >Hello all! >My grandmother gave me some great organ christmas records and various >other christmas records, such as the Carpenters Christmas and Bing = Crosby. >I was also excited, because now that I had some records, I could try out >my record player, which came with my entertainment center setup that is = in >the master bedroom. >I had never really operated a record player, as in my lifetime I have = only >been exposed to CDs, and a minimal amount of tapes. <snip>    
(back) Subject: Re: JW Steere organ From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2002 14:18:42 -0600   The J.W.Steere organ in St. Barnabas Episcopal Church was built in 1895 as Opus # 406 with two manuals and sixteen ranks. At some point the tracker action was poorly electrified. The J.W.Steer firm was located in = Westfield, MA. The firm installed over fourteen instruments in the Troy area = beginning in 1867.   Sand Lawn    
(back) Subject: The Articulate Acoustic at Slee Hall From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2002 15:41:59 -0500   Part 3 of "Adventures with Felix Hell"   I was delighted to read Peter Cardinell's comments recently concerning the effect of the reverberant acoustic at the Cathedral Basilica of The Sacred Heart upon the performance by Felix of the Passacaglia and Fugue. This provides the perfect prelude to my remarks about Slee Hall in Buffalo and Fisk Opus 95. As I entered the room, I was immediately struck by the similarity of this Fisk instrument to the new one recently installed at Finney Chapel, Oberlin College. It has the same free standing, self contained appearance as Finney, it has a flat pedal board, and the console is built into the front of the casework on a quite elevated 'balcony" that allows a wonderful unobstructed view of the organist at work. I found myself almost as excited to "see" Felix work as to hear   him perform. The program he chose turned out to be an awesome visual display as well as a terrific musical listening experience. Upon first look, Slee Hall seems a rather stark and   almost cold room. the stage shell was covered by a kind   of ribbed plywood looking material, and the rest of the   room, a sort of pebble finish plaster. As soon as I got   to my seat, I began to hear that this space offered a decidedly different acoustic than I had ever heard before. I could actually hear parts of conversations from people that were clear across the room from my position. The only way I can describe it with my decidedly amateur abilities, is "acoustic clarity" This   room was not reverberant, but was still somehow lively.   With my knowledge of the sound of the Fisk at Oberlin, I was almost apprehensive that the same sort of sound in this room might be glaringly harsh. I couldn't have been more wrong. Of the six programed works Felix performed, 4 were Bach. To my admittedly inexperienced ear, these were the most enjoyable performances of Bach I had ever heard. Certainly I have no knowledge of authenticity in   performance of these works, but I was able to hear details and nuances that I didn't even know existed. Certainly the ability to see registrations being changed, and watching Felix's body expression while he played helped me appreciate all these details of the music, but the room acoustics, the excellent tonal finishing of this instrument, plus Felix's technical skill and musical sensitivity combined to a completely joyous result. Peter Cardinell speaks of the loss of articulation in the Passacaglia at Sacred Heart due to the totally different acoustic environment there. I had yet to hear   that concert yet, so I had no idea how different it would be. The lists have recently contained much discussion about the authenticity of Bach performance, and I certainly have not studied nearly enough to speak   with any authority on the subject, but my ears tell me that Bach would have not written all of that ornamentation and other expressions if it could not be separated out by the listeners ear. I find Bach much more exciting to listen too in an acoustic like Slee Hall enjoys. I certainly enjoyed Felix's entire program at Slee Hall, but was most excited to hear the Liszt Ad Nos for   the first time. As an avid follower of the organ lists and a frequent participant on the live IRC pipechats, I   had heard much excitement from other list members about   Felix's preparation of this works for inclusion in his programs. Through the enormously interesting grapevine that somehow finds its way to the organ lists, I had heard the comment several months ago that John Weaver had pronounced Felix's preparation of Ad Nos as "ready". This kind of comment creates great excitement and anticipation for those who follow Felix's repertoire, and mine was no exception. I had actually never even heard a recording of the piece, so Felix's performance was full of surprises for me. I did not ever imagine so many notes could be crammed into an organ piece, and be performed through such a dynamic range of loud and soft. The acoustic at Slee Hall again   came through, and every note, detail and nuance was heard. Combine that with the visibility of Felix's feet   and the expressive postures his body assumes while performing, and you have the finest audio/visual experience i have ever experienced at an organ concert.   I found myself gasping out loud at the footwork. In my mind, watching Felix perform this piece gives real meaning to the Saint-Saens "Danse Macabre" Saint-Saens   might have had something different in mind when he wrote the piece, but I couldn't help but think how macabre was this organist's danse I was witnessing. I really enjoyed Rich Blacklock's remarks that when he asked Felix how he did that, his answer was "I don't really know". So, there you have it. 3 Felix Hell performances attended over a 2 week period, and I was completely elevated by every one. This makes 7 Felix performances I have witnessed all told, and they seem to have come in clumps, 2 to be exact. I have heard this fine young man on all different kinds of organs in as many different places, and I find myself just as excited with anticipation to be there at the next performance I   can attend. I again thank Felix for his outstanding work and sharing his genius with us all. Thanks to Hans   for standing by his side, and to both of them for calling me "friend". and welcoming me so warmly when I show up. It made the 1500 miles of driving through pouring rain, ice and snow storms, and wind velocities that exceeded my forward speed, seem like a short ride in the sun.   My sincere thanks to All for reading Mike Gettelman