PipeChat Digest #3259 - Monday, November 25, 2002
 
Re: St John's Holland Road
  by "alantaylor" <alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk>
Re: Turntables (off topic)
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Last Sunday before Advent
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Last Sunday before Advent
  by <lindr@cch.com>
Ahlborn Archive or similar
  by <stu@stushouse.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Last Sunday before Advent
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Ahlborn Archive or similar
  by "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net>
Re: Last Sunday before Advent
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Alan Freed's 13 flats
  by <lindr@cch.com>
Re: Alan Freed's 13 flats
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Ahlborn Archive or similar
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
Re: Last Sunday before Advent
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: Alan Freed's 13 flats
  by "Andrew Caskie" <caskie@totalise.co.uk>
RE: Minor Key French Noels
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Alan Freed's 13 flats
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Last Sunday before Advent
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Alan Freed's 13 flats
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Last Sunday before Advent
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3254 - 11/23/02 St John's Holland Road
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Minor Key French Noels
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Last Sunday before Advent
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
RE: a young man's lament
  by "Tiseo, Paul (PSC)" <Paul.Tiseo@vw.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: St John's Holland Road From: "alantaylor" <alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 12:18:37 -0000   This is hardly a description of St John,s Holland Road Sunday by Sunday. Believe it or not, but ST John's doesn't have a staff of 40 clerics. Let alone seven bishops. It has one unpaid (NSM) vicar. It has one service = each week and a congregation of about ten. Also, you were writing about an = event 10 years ago.!!!   Alan Taylor ----- Original Message -----     From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, November 23, 2002 9:42 PM Subject: Re: St John's Holland Road     > When I visited that church in 1992, I was told it was the last church in the > greater London area to have a stone vault. > > The service was on Friday evening, to enable a 90+ frail old priest = crown > the lifesize statue of Mary with a tiara he had been saving up for all = his > life - it finally cost about NZ$40,000 as I recall. The fellow was so = old > and frail that three men had to help him up a stepladder. > When celebrating Holy Communion at that Service, the old fellow was largely > invisible as he remained seated in his wheel chair. > > The music was OK, but mostly organ bombasting against a few singers in > plainsong stuff. The instrument was played absurdly loudly, with chorus > reeds even during the Communion. > > Afterwards there was a lot of wine and food in the back of the Church. I > tried to speak to many of the clergy there, but not one would even = answer my > proffered hand and greeting. Why? Well, as my penfriend (who took me there) > said, 'By your grey trousers and coloured jacket they think you're an > Evangelical. People here are very very very high-Church and all clergy never > wear anything but black, including the socks.' > > The place was more Roman than Roman. At one point, someone declaimed how > gracious it was that their Holy Father the Pope had permitted the use of the > correct books in the Church in England. In other words, here, CofE books > were not used. Seven bishops were present, mostly assistant bishops, and all > wore elaborate displays of purple, lace and hideously expensive = jewellery > and ornament, culminating in constantly swopping between birettas and > mitres. > > The hymns were long and tedious, mostly in Latin. > > The congregation, apart from the approx.40 clergy, numbered about 50, = and > most of these were Indians wearing pure white suits. The rest were = elderly > white folks, almost all men, like my penfriend. > > To be honest, I really felt I did not belong at all, and was certainly = not > made to feel welcome by anyone before or after. The service itself was, = to > put it terribly politely, not me or my tradition. I was glad to escape, > noting to myself that the building's acoustics were one thing I could = give > thanks for. Nothing would induce me to go back. If that's what Christ > intended worship to be, then I'll plain give up. > > Ross > -----Original Message----- > From: alantaylor <alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Sunday, November 24, 2002 7:13 AM > Subject: St John's Holland Road > > > >John Foss mentions the organ in St John's Holland Road and indeed the > >wonderful building. > > > >This church should be on a list of "churches and organs well worth a visit" > >As John implies the church is stunning, if a little run down. The organ was > >built by Gern, who was himself, an ex employee of Cavaille-Coll. The organ > >was then rebuilt by Willis 3. > > > >Until quite recently the organ was in a very bad state. The only way to > play > >it was to use full organ, including the Tuba, as there were so many missing > >notes. Then the church called in a quite remarkably organ building firm > >called BC Shepherd and Son. They, for a very modest sum, got most of = the > >organ working. There are only a few stops on the choir manual that do = not > >now work. (The Shepherds also built the amazing organ in the French Church > >in Leicester Square, London) If any lister wants an address where CDs of > >both organs can be purchased, drop me a line off list and I will furnish > the > >address. They really are worth the bother. > > > >ST John's only has one service a week. This is a Solemn Mass which is > >celebrated at 6.30pm on a Sunday evening. The congregation is tiny and they > >always welcome visitors. The organist is always pleased to allow fellow > >players to play. > > > >Cheers, > > > >Alan Taylor > >-----      
(back) Subject: Re: Turntables (off topic) From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 07:40:33 -0800   Josh, The aux. input expects a signal level of about 1.00 volt. A turntable pickup (yes the arm with the needle so to speak) puts out about .005 volts hence the faint volume! Also the AUX input is not RIAA compensated so that means it would sound tinny even if you could hear it. Most receivers have - or maybe no longer? - a phono input. This input has an extra stage of amplification plus the required compensation to bring it up to the level where you can hear it. Solution is simple: Go to Radio shack (although I dislike that chain immensely) and buy a "phono Pre-amplifier" around $29? bucks - not sure. and hook that between your phono cables and the AUX input and Bing will drive you out of the room. Or turn down the volume before you do this. ;-)   Merry Xmas   John V  
(back) Subject: Last Sunday before Advent From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 09:59:26 -0600   Yesterday was "Christ the King" Sunday - did anyone play any good organ music at church?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Last Sunday before Advent From: <lindr@cch.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 10:30:19 -0600     Prelude pieces were unusual:   Gerbert Mutter--Piece #1 from 6 Pieces (I called it "Fanfare" to avoid the 6-word German thingy, which was merely a tempo indication. Hindemithian in flavor, rather stirring and triumphant.) Thomas J. Crawford--Processional (Canadian, copyright 1950; late Romantic piece that requires a sympathetic instrument and a good sense of rubato = and moderate pace to accommodate the harmonic rhythm. I'd like to see more of this composer's work.)   Postlude: Walton--Crown Imperial   I used the "new" version with the composer's 1963 cuts that appears in the recent OUP anthology because my original copy is in tatters and dangerous for a page turner to handle. I prefer the cuts I decided on to those of = the composer's :-) and will have to paste up my version for future personal use, I think.   Bob Lind     = "Glenda" = <gksjd85@direcway To: "'PipeChat'" = <pipechat@pipechat.org> .com> cc: = Sent by: Subject: Last Sunday = before Advent <pipechat@pipecha = t.org> = = = 11/25/2002 09:59 = AM = Please respond to = "PipeChat" = = =         Yesterday was "Christ the King" Sunday - did anyone play any good organ music at church?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com           "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org              
(back) Subject: Ahlborn Archive or similar From: <stu@stushouse.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 18:07:48 +0100   Hi. our church has a Viscount Grand Opera organ. 15 years old now. DSP = sampling technology has come a long way since. I am looking to add stops = with greater tonal accuracy. Has anyone got any opinion on the Ahlborn = Archive modules? In particular, I am trying to obtain a realistic = diapaison sound like the Great organ of medium/large Willis instrument. In = other words the English Cathederal sound. I appreciate I will never = achieve the sound of a real instrument, but for =A33000 or so I don't = expect to. Anyway, back to the point, which Archive module best suits the = above? Any comments on this, plus other competitive products to the Arcive = would be helpful.   Stuart       _______________________________________________________________________ Freeserve AnyTime, only =A313.99 per month with one month's FREE trial! For more information visit http://www.freeserve.com/time/ or call free on = 0800 970 8890      
(back) Subject: Re: Last Sunday before Advent From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 09:44:04 -0800     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>   > Yesterday was "Christ the King" Sunday - did anyone play any good organ > music at church?   Well, among low-church Congregationals, it was also Thanksgiving Sunday. I did two transcriptions: the Randall Thompson "Now Thank We All Our God" (arranged by Jonathan Barnhart from "A Psalm of Thanksgiving" -- which I = am not familiar with), and my annual Edward MacDowell "A.D. 1620" in honor of the Pilgrims.   Michael Fox   >    
(back) Subject: Re: Ahlborn Archive or similar From: "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 12:55:20 -0500   Hi Stuart and gang,   I have an Ahlborn Romantic Module which has an 8-foot diapason in it. I am= =20 quire satisfied with the sounds of the Ahlborn module.   Of course, it helps to put the sounds through an audio system with a little= =20 bit of reverb added.   The plain sound is very dry.   That is the same for the Allen MDS Expander II module as well.   It also has an 8-foot Principal in it.   The Ahlborn modules only have about 20 voices in them, whereas the Allen=20 MDS Expander II has 100 voices.   Both modules retail for about $2800.00, but you can very often get them for= =20 about $1800.00.   Paul R. Swank Baltimore, MD USA     At 06:07 PM 11/25/02 +0100, you wrote: >Hi. our church has a Viscount Grand Opera organ. 15 years old now. DSP=20 >sampling technology has come a long way since. I am looking to add stops=20 >with greater tonal accuracy. Has anyone got any opinion on the Ahlborn=20 >Archive modules? In particular, I am trying to obtain a realistic=20 >diapaison sound like the Great organ of medium/large Willis instrument. In= =20 >other words the English Cathederal sound. I appreciate I will never=20 >achieve the sound of a real instrument, but for =A33000 or so I don't= expect=20 >to. Anyway, back to the point, which Archive module best suits the above?= =20 >Any comments on this, plus other competitive products to the Arcive would= =20 >be helpful. > >Stuart    
(back) Subject: Re: Last Sunday before Advent From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 13:56:12 -0500   On 11/25/02 10:59 AM, "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > Yesterday was "Christ the King" Sunday - did anyone play any good organ > music at church? > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > Christ the King at Saint Luke's, Manhattan   Like Bob Lind's people, we enjoyed Walton's Crown Imperial for the = postlude. I don't KNOW, but there did not SEEM to be any cuts in it.   Since the processional hymn was "Crown Him with Many Crowns" (Diademata), which I recall from my time in Baltimore as "Cran him with many crans," = the prelude was Wilbur Held's prelude on that tune.   Hymn of the Day was "Jerusalem the Golden," but regretably not to EWING, = but to LBW's inexplicably cantankerous COMPLAINER (from Southern Harmony). I enjoy Southern Harmony stuff as much as the next guy, but I complained to Pastor and Cantor. Ewing may be sentimentally lush, especially in 13 = flats or whatever it is, but it's fun to SING.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Alan Freed's 13 flats From: <lindr@cch.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 14:18:16 -0600     I wouldn't doubt that I lived in 13 flats in my young-adult years, but playing in 13 flats puts one into the unenviable key of Gbb, I think.   While we've arrived at the point of too many accidentals, can you name = some organ works that employ 7 sharps or 7 flats?   I played Jacques Ibert's Choral ("The Souls of the Righteous Are in the=   Hand of God") for All Saints a few weeks back, and the final page is in= 7 sharps. BTW, this is a most worthwhile piece, if you don't know it.   Not having reference to scores here at the office, I THINK at least par= t of Nancy Plummer Faxon's Toccata is in 7 sharps; ditto the middle movement= of Salom=E9's organ sonata.   RJL     Ewing may be sentimentally lush, especially in 13 flats or whatever it is, but it's fun to SING.   Alan   =      
(back) Subject: Re: Alan Freed's 13 flats From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 16:41:32 EST     --part1_1a4.c6cb398.2b13f30c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 11/25/2002 3:19:34 PM Eastern Standard Time, = lindr@cch.com writes:     > While we've arrived at the point of too many accidentals, can you name = some > organ works that employ 7 sharps or 7 flats? > >   I'd have to go check the score, but i >think< that a section of the Norman =   Cocker "Tuba Tune" has a section in 7 sharps.   Rick in VA   --part1_1a4.c6cb398.2b13f30c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 11/25/2002 3:19:34 PM Eastern Standard Time, lindr@cch.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">While we've = arrived at the point of too many accidentals, can you name some <BR>organ works that employ 7 sharps or 7 flats? <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>I'd have to go check the score, but i &gt;think&lt; that a section of = the Norman Cocker "Tuba Tune" has a section in 7 sharps. <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1a4.c6cb398.2b13f30c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Ahlborn Archive or similar From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 16:53:24 -0500   At 06:07 PM 11/25/2002 +0100, you wrote: >Hi. our church has a Viscount Grand Opera organ. 15 years old now. DSP=20 >sampling technology has come a long way since. I am looking to add stops=20 >with greater tonal accuracy. Has anyone got any opinion on the Ahlborn=20 >Archive modules? In particular, I am trying to obtain a realistic=20 >diapaison sound like the Great organ of medium/large Willis instrument. In= =20 >other words the English Cathederal sound. I appreciate I will never=20 >achieve the sound of a real instrument, but for =A33000 or so I don't= expect=20 >to. Anyway, back to the point, which Archive module best suits the above?= =20 >Any comments on this, plus other competitive products to the Arcive would= =20 >be helpful. > >Stuart Stuart,   I hope that this organ has MIDI out. If it is first generation digital,=20 they will have, and they will also sound continental, rather than English.   Being an Ahlborn dealer in Canada, we sell the Archive modules, and they=20 are very popular with certain pipe organ builders ( in the U.S.) for the=20 32' stops, which are very good, if you put on the appropriate audio that=20 can handle the low frequencies.   From your description, the Romantic module would suit you best. Besides=20 that one the Archive 202 may also fit the bill. The Classic module sounds= =20 pretty much like the Ahlborn organs, the 201 sounds like a baroque=20 organ. The Romantic module may even have samples that were taken from=20 English organs. The nice thing about these organs is that you can use all= =20 20 stops simultaneously, and the front panel works like a stop rail with=20 it's own capture system. Each voice can be tuned, levelled, scaled, add=20 pipe noise (where appropriate), fluctuation control, ensemble etc. Wind=20 chests can be setup, historic temperaments can be used, can be finetuned=20 with other instruments etc. These are very versatile units.   One thing that needs saying though, and that is you need to hook them up to= =20 good audio. It makes a world of differance believe me. Here we at Classic= =20 Organs, quite often modify these units to 6 channels out, balanced line=20 audio, in other words 2 channels per division, and it makes a big=20 difference. A number of pipe organ builders we deal with request them this= =20 way. It makes a lot of sense for pipe builders, as the total cost as part= =20 of a pipe organ deal is not that great, but it does make it expensive to=20 add to an older electronic organ.   I take it that you are in the U.K. Run down (or up), and go and hear one=20 for yourself. They are excellent units, and quite popular. Over here in=20 North America, they sometimes pop up used on e-bay or one the the organ=20 classifieds lists on the internet.   Regards,   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: Re: Last Sunday before Advent From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 22:40:16 -0000   Christ, the King - Voluntaries   J. S. Bach   Meine Seele erhebt den Herren   Kommst du nun, Jesu, von Himmel herunter   (Chorale Preludes)   Komm, heiliger Geist. Herr Gott   (Fantasia)   See http://www.clent-worcs.co.uk       -----Original Message----- From: Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: 'PipeChat' <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 25 November 2002 15:51 Subject: Last Sunday before Advent     >Yesterday was "Christ the King" Sunday - did anyone play any good organ >music at church? > >Glenda Sutton >gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Alan Freed's 13 flats From: "Andrew Caskie" <caskie@totalise.co.uk> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 22:45:18 -0000   It's only 6 I'm afraid - but still plenty to contend with - I did it in a recital on Saturday.   Best wishes   Andy Caskie   On 25 Nov 2002 at 16:41, RMaryman@aol.com wrote:   In a message dated 11/25/2002 3:19:34 PM Eastern Standard Time, lindr@cch.com writes:     While we've arrived at the point of too many accidentals, can you name some organ works that employ 7 sharps or 7 flats?       I'd have to go check the score, but i >think< that a section of the Norman Cocker "Tuba Tune" has a section in 7 sharps.   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: RE: Minor Key French Noels From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 18:58:44 -0500   > They don't have individual titles to evoke any images. This made me = think that I should > put in some note of explanation.   Are they, then, based on pre-existing melodies? The captions of the = Daquin noels are registrations, not very relevant to the listener. They are = based on Christmas carol melodies known by their incipits, and familiar to the original audiences, but now one must do a little research to learn what = they are. Once knows, explanatory notes are appropriate. Assuming that these Tournier pieces (I don't know them at all, alas) derive similarly, the audience deserves to know something about the 'canti firmi.'   Keith Zimmer writes rather cryptically:   > (2). With all the beautiful Christmas music out there in more cheerful major keys, why is it even necessary to play these pieces?   They are harp pieces. How extensive IS the authentic and reasonably accessible (i.e. in-print) harp solo repertoire for Christmas? Despite = the example of David, the caricatures of angels sitting on clouds with harps, etc. the harp is not the typical liturgical instrument that the organ is. He might not have that much to choose from, and besides, it sounds as = though he admires these selections. Let's give them a chance.   > (3). If program notes are necessary in a worship service to explain = away a piece, maybe the piece doesn't need to be played.   Explaining is not the same as explaining away. And no music really = *needs* to be played.   > Music for the worship service is for the congregation - both those who listen attentively and those who do not. If they don't understand it, = then it's no loftier than having the radio tuned to public radio while you do something at home.   I agree, but if I grasp your point, it is either demagogic or defeatist: give them only what they will immediately understand, what they expect, = what is already in within their narrow orbit. That requirement would nowadays preclude almost all strictly instrumental music.   Do you advocate program notes, or deny their value? People tend not to understand everything in a Bible passage, either, even if they assume that they understand the reading because every word is in their vocabulary. That's why there have always been sermons. The same can be said just as = much of worthwhile music, whether in a minor or a major key.  
(back) Subject: RE: Alan Freed's 13 flats From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 18:08:20 -0600   I believe Brahms wrote an organ fugue in 7 flats. You know, I don't hear people playing the Brahms' preludes and fugues.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: RE: Last Sunday before Advent From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 19:10:18 -0500   My prelude was on Picardy, by Richard Warner, from a yellow book of pieces for Communion published by Concordia.   The postlude was on Diademata, by Alec Wyton (from his purple book of = simple pieces on hymns for the liturgical year-- forget the title off-hand).   Both of these hymns were used in the service. During Communion, I played several other short pieces all based on hymn sung.   As extensive as my organ music library is, this isn't really possible as often as one might expect, so when the opportunity arises I take advantage of it. Alas, I'm on an electronic these days, so that I am reluctant to waste masterpieces on it that I otherwise would wish to play.      
(back) Subject: Re: Alan Freed's 13 flats From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 19:16:10 EST     --part1_1a4.c7718d7.2b14174a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   its tough music   --part1_1a4.c7718d7.2b14174a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>its tough = music</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1a4.c7718d7.2b14174a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Last Sunday before Advent From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 19:18:11 EST     --part1_7a.319b55c8.2b1417c3_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   i improvised on diademata for the postlude and used the widor adagio from = the 5th as a prelude. for the offertory, i was forced to accompany the = handbell group for an arrangement of hyfrydol by j. lincker.   --part1_7a.319b55c8.2b1417c3_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>i improvised on = diademata for the postlude and used the widor adagio from the 5th as a = prelude. &nbsp;for the offertory, i was forced to accompany the handbell = group for an arrangement of hyfrydol by j. lincker.</FONT></HTML>   --part1_7a.319b55c8.2b1417c3_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3254 - 11/23/02 St John's Holland Road From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 19:19:56 -0500   On 11/24/02 2:42 PM, "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > I'm probably boring you by now, but I hope you get the picture. > "Boring" Yeah, sure A MOST inspiring report. Every word of it. I hope = my church can do a tenth as much.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Minor Key French Noels From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 19:26:33 -0500   On 11/25/02 6:58 PM, "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > Do you advocate program notes, or deny their value? People tend not to > understand everything in a Bible passage, either, even if they assume = that > they understand the reading because every word is in their vocabulary. > That's why there have always been sermons. The same can be said just as = much > of worthwhile music, whether in a minor or a major key. > Paul Emmons:   Hurrah! I think you said something(s) important and well.   Alan Freed    
(back) Subject: Re: Last Sunday before Advent From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 18:32:45 -0600   Yeh...I played up a storm yesterday! Prelude was "Antienne" from the "Frescobali Sweet"...Langlais.. a friend of mine calls it the Frescobaldi sweet, since it's in his honor by Langlais. Offertory was Echo Voluntary by John James (18th cent english), and Nun danket by Karg-Elert for the postlude. the whole choir stayed behind to hear it all...the rest of the congregation ran for their lives however! LOL     Jon Bertschinger  
(back) Subject: RE: a young man's lament From: "Tiseo, Paul (PSC)" <Paul.Tiseo@vw.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2002 17:09:11 -0500   Hi Alan,   To answer your questions - I currently work as a customer service rep for Volkswagen. And I am where I am now because of the choices I made! = However, I would like to change careers sooner rather than later.   Paul     On 11/22/02 5:13 PM, "Tiseo, Paul (PSC)" <Paul.Tiseo@vw.com> wrote:   > Hello friends: > > I am a 25 year old Catholic man from the Detroit area and a wannabe > organist.   Paul, what do you do for a living? And why are you where you are?   Short quick questions, but a start.   I think you'll get more helpful replies from others. But I'm willing to talk to you more as well. OK?   Alan Freed, St. Luke's Church, Manhattan       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org