PipeChat Digest #3167 - Thursday, October 10, 2002
 
My Article (x-posted, somewhat long)
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
RE: Mixture Question
  by "David Smit" <DavidS@astrolabegroup.com>
RE: Pipe Organ Quotations
  by "David Smit" <DavidS@astrolabegroup.com>
 

(back) Subject: My Article (x-posted, somewhat long) From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Wed, 9 Oct 2002 23:40:11 EDT     --part1_174.101baf54.2ad6509b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Friends, I thought I would post my article for our Nov 2002 newsletter. = The theme for the entire issue is supposed to be on stewardship. I thought I would use the "dedication and faithfulness" spin. Anyway, here goes. I realize that some of my historical details may be a tad off, but I tried = to keep it fairly short and to the point.   Neil Brown First UMC, Toms River, NJ USA   "THE ROLE OF CHOIRS IN WORSHIP"   When Moses had led the Israelites to the place from where they would cross =   the Jordan River into the Promised Land, he carried out God's wishes in giving to each tribe a parcel of land. The Levites, however, were not = given land, because the Lord was to be their inheritance: they were to devote themselves to serving the Lord. The Levites were assigned particular = duties. Among these were persons selected to be singers. These musicians were charged with "ministering before the Lord", first in the Tent and later in =   the Temple. This is all they did. Their linen robes set them apart as "servants" of the Living God. David gave them these instructions: "Sing = to the Lord a new song; play skillfully with a confident sound." (Psalm 33:3)   Our worship choirs have a significant role. It is not merely to sing = songs, but more importantly, to lead in worship and to offer gifts of praise: "to =   minister before the Lord." Our singers understand the dedication and faithfulness required for those gifts to be worthy offerings. Choir = members devote about 3 hours per week in rehearsal and worship. They do so = because they love to sing, but also because it is an act of service. As the = singers prepare their anthems musically, they also internalize the texts, so that, =   when presented, God can use them to touch hearts and lives. Singing = anthems, however, is only one part of the ministry: the choirs also assist the = entire congregation in corporate acts of praise. And yes, the robes are a visual =   reminder of the choir members' unity of purpose and their servant roles as =   worship leaders.   It is important to mention our Praise Team, as they serve a similar = function in the Informal Service.   Offering our very best gifts of praise requires hard work, and our choirs indeed work very hard. The singers do so willingly and lovingly because = they believe in what they do, in why they do it, and in the One for whom they sing.   First UMC of Toms River is indeed blessed to have wonderful worship = choirs. I hope that you will take time every week to pray for the singers as they prepare for worship. And, if you love to sing and can make Choir a part = of your life, we invite you to join us.   As Christians, we sing because we cannot help but sing. Our hearts are overflowing with praise and thanksgiving because of God's great love for = his people, and because of his wonderful gift of salvation through his son, = Jesus Christ.   Keep a smile on your face, and a song in your heart!   --part1_174.101baf54.2ad6509b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Friends, I thought I would post my article for = our Nov 2002 newsletter.&nbsp; The theme for the entire issue is supposed = to be on stewardship.&nbsp; I thought I would use the "dedication and = faithfulness" spin.&nbsp; Anyway, here goes.&nbsp; I realize that some of = my historical details may be a tad off, but I tried to keep it fairly = short and to the point.<BR> <BR> Neil Brown<BR> First UMC, Toms River, NJ USA<BR> <BR> "THE ROLE OF CHOIRS IN WORSHIP"<BR> <BR> When Moses had led the Israelites to the place from where they would cross = the Jordan River into the Promised Land, he carried out God's wishes in = giving to each tribe a parcel of land.&nbsp; The Levites, however, were = not given land, because the Lord was to be their inheritance:&nbsp; they = were to devote themselves to serving the Lord.&nbsp; The Levites were assigned = particular duties.&nbsp; Among these were persons selected to be = singers.&nbsp; These musicians were charged with "ministering before the = Lord", first in the Tent and later in the Temple.&nbsp; This is all they = did.&nbsp; Their linen robes set them apart as "servants" of the Living = God.&nbsp; David gave them these instructions: "Sing to the Lord a new = song; play skillfully with a confident sound." (Psalm 33:3)<BR> <BR> Our worship choirs have a significant role.&nbsp; It is not merely to sing = songs, but more importantly, to lead in worship and to offer gifts of = praise: "to minister before the Lord."&nbsp; Our singers understand the = dedication and faithfulness required for those gifts to be worthy = offerings.&nbsp; Choir members devote about 3 hours per week in rehearsal = and worship.&nbsp; They do so because they love to sing, but also because = it is an act of service.&nbsp; As the singers prepare their anthems = musically, they also internalize the texts, so that, when presented, God = can use them to touch hearts and lives.&nbsp; Singing anthems, however, is = only one part of the ministry: the choirs also assist the entire = congregation in corporate acts of praise.&nbsp; And yes, the robes are a = visual reminder of the choir members' unity of purpose and their servant = roles as worship leaders.<BR> <BR> It is important to mention our Praise Team, as they serve a similar = function in the Informal Service.<BR> <BR> Offering our very best gifts of praise requires hard work, and our choirs = indeed work very hard.&nbsp; The singers do so willingly and lovingly = because they believe in what they do, in why they do it, and in the One = for whom they sing.<BR> <BR> First UMC of Toms River is indeed blessed to have wonderful worship = choirs.&nbsp; I hope that you will take time every week to pray for the = singers as they prepare for worship.&nbsp; And, if&nbsp; you love to sing = and can make Choir a part of your life, we invite you to join us.<BR> <BR> As Christians, we sing because we cannot help but sing.&nbsp; Our hearts = are overflowing with praise and thanksgiving because of God's great love = for his people, and because of his wonderful gift of salvation through his = son, Jesus Christ.<BR> <BR> Keep a smile on your face, and a song in your heart!</FONT></HTML>   --part1_174.101baf54.2ad6509b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Mixture Question From: "David Smit" <DavidS@astrolabegroup.com> Date: Thu, 10 Oct 2002 07:17:31 +0200   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C2701C.5548E130 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   Hi, If they are named appropriately they would probably be two unison-quint mixtures a fifth (or perhaps even an octave) apart. I would venture either 2-11/3-1 and 11/3-1-2/3 or a fifth higher. This was almost universal in the period you speak of (in some cases they went down = a fifth), but I cannot say whether Austin followed this. Organ Encyclopaedia is correct in the Fourniture. I would differ slightly with the Plein Jeu - I would expect it to be ALL = the ranks of the Fourniture and Cymbale. Dave   -----Original Message----- From: Kzimmer0817@aol.com [mailto:Kzimmer0817@aol.com] Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2002 12:47 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Mixture Question     List,   I am looking at a spec for an Austin organ that is for sale.   The great contains an 8-4-2 Principal chorus and a Fourniture III.   The Swell contains a Flute chorus and a Plein Jeu III.   My question is what are these mixtures?   According to the Encyclopedia of Organ Stops (www.organstops.org), the Fourniture consists of 3 or more ranks, but I've usually seen 4.   Also, according to the Encyclopedia, the Plein Jeu is anywhere from 5-7 ranks and consists of the upper ranks of the Fourniture and the Cymbale.   I guess, if anybody is familiar with how Austin used configured these mixtures back in 1939, please let me know.   Thanks, Keith Zimmerman     ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C2701C.5548E130 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D"text/html; = charset=3Diso-8859-1">     <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D890581405-10102002>Hi,</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D890581405-10102002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN = class=3D890581405-10102002>If they are named appropriately they would probably be two unison-quint = mixtures a fifth (or perhaps even an octave) apart.</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D890581405-10102002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN = class=3D890581405-10102002>I would venture either 2-11/3-1 and 11/3-1-2/3 or a fifth higher. This was = almost universal in the period you speak of (in some cases they went down a = fifth), but I cannot say whether Austin followed this.</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D890581405-10102002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN = class=3D890581405-10102002>Organ Encyclopaedia is correct in the Fourniture.</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D890581405-10102002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN = class=3D890581405-10102002>I would differ slightly with the Plein Jeu - I would expect it to be ALL the = ranks of the Fourniture and Cymbale.</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D890581405-10102002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D890581405-10102002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D890581405-10102002>Dave</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D#0000ff face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D890581405-10102002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE> <DIV align=3Dleft class=3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3Dltr><FONT = face=3DTahoma size=3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> Kzimmer0817@aol.com [mailto:Kzimmer0817@aol.com]<BR><B>Sent:</B> Thursday, October 10, 2002 = 12:47 AM<BR><B>To:</B> pipechat@pipechat.org<BR><B>Subject:</B> Mixture Question<BR><BR></DIV></FONT><FONT face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT face=3DArial lang=3D0 size=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF">List,<BR><BR>I am looking at a = spec for an Austin organ that is for sale.<BR><BR>The great contains an 8-4-2 = Principal chorus and a Fourniture III.<BR><BR>The Swell contains a Flute chorus = and a Plein Jeu III.<BR><BR>My question is what are these = mixtures?<BR><BR>According to the Encyclopedia of Organ Stops (www.organstops.org), the Fourniture consists of 3 or more ranks, but I've usually seen 4.&nbsp; = <BR><BR>Also, according to the Encyclopedia, the Plein Jeu is anywhere from 5-7 ranks = and consists of the upper ranks of the Fourniture and the Cymbale.<BR><BR>I = guess, if anybody is familiar with how Austin used configured these mixtures = back in 1939, please let me know.<BR><BR>Thanks,<BR>Keith Zimmerman</FONT> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C2701C.5548E130--  
(back) Subject: RE: Pipe Organ Quotations From: "David Smit" <DavidS@astrolabegroup.com> Date: Thu, 10 Oct 2002 07:23:57 +0200   Hi Paul, List,   This is truly fantastic - there are some real gems here. Thanks for the effort!   Dave Smit   -----Original Message----- From: Emmons, Paul [mailto:pemmons@wcupa.edu] Sent: Wednesday, October 09, 2002 8:56 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: Pipe Organ Quotations     Thanks to the home page of our university library, I came across a site = that amalgamates at least some quotes from three books or projects. These apparently include the Columbia Dictionary of Quotations, which is the = most ambitious. Many readers were assigned to authors to read their complete works and submit (on a form that could be e-mailed) anything epigrammatic. On online database was contemplated, and I am glad to see that something has come of it. Perhaps the project is still ongoing. Yours truly read some plays and other matter by Noel Coward for them some years back. (Rather barren stuff he proved to be if you're looking for single = sentences that have any interest out of context. Now Wilde or Chesterton would be quite another matter...). <SNIP>