PipeChat Digest #3176 - Monday, October 14, 2002
 
Re: silence is golden
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: silence is golden
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: silence is golden
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: silence is golden
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
"Swallowing" instruments
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: silence is golden
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: silence is golden From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2002 15:44:50 EDT     --part1_14c.15dabe43.2adc78b2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 10/14/02 1:02:12 PM Eastern Daylight Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:     > , keep the chorale prelude to the > processional hymn down to 2 to 4 minutes.   Ah! Exactly where the "chorale prelude" should be.... part of the processional hymn! ;-)   However, the Voluntary which precedes it during the congregation's preparation for worship should be able to take up ten minutes (max). If = it is going to be longer, then the announcements should be made earlier.   Geez... how wonderful worship would be if announcements and sermons were limites to a total of ten minutes!! ;-)   Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_14c.15dabe43.2adc78b2_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 10/14/02 1:02:12 PM Eastern Daylight Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net = writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">, keep the chorale = prelude to the <BR>processional hymn down to 2 to 4 minutes. </FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Ah! &nbsp;&nbsp;Exactly where the "chorale prelude" should be.... part = of the processional hymn! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>However, the Voluntary which precedes it during the congregation's = preparation for worship should be able to take up ten minutes (max). = &nbsp;If it is going to be longer, then the announcements should be made = earlier. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Geez... how wonderful worship would be if announcements and sermons = were limites to a total of ten minutes!! &nbsp;&nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_14c.15dabe43.2adc78b2_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: silence is golden From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2002 15:49:59 EDT     --part1_14c.15dabe48.2adc79e7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 10/14/02 2:11:56 PM Eastern Daylight Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:     > So I presume you make similar gestures during his sermons? ;) > I remember when I was a child, the organist used to open and close the = swell shades (individual pneumatics) when the sermon would get too long. The minister never seemed to realize what was going on but would become distracted and end it.   This same minister also told the story that when he came to this church, = he instructed the ushers to simply hold up a wrist watch from their position = at the West Door to let him know that it was time to stop. He said one = Sunday when he got carried away he looked at the usher who was standing next to = the door holding a calendar!!   Other "useful aids" include regular, quiet notes played on "chiff" only, resembling water dripping, and ambulance noises, telephone, and barking = dog noises from the synthesizer .     Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_14c.15dabe48.2adc79e7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 10/14/02 2:11:56 PM Eastern Daylight Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">So I presume you = make similar gestures during his sermons? ;) <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I remember when I was a child, the organist used = to open and close the swell shades (individual pneumatics) when the sermon = would get too long. &nbsp;&nbsp;The minister never seemed to realize what = was going on but would become distracted and end it. <BR> <BR>This same minister also told the story that when he came to this = church, he instructed the ushers to simply hold up a wrist watch from = their position at the West Door to let him know that it was time to stop. = &nbsp;&nbsp;He said one Sunday when he got carried away he looked at the = usher who was standing next to the door holding a calendar!! <BR> <BR>Other "useful aids" include regular, quiet notes played on "chiff" = only, resembling water dripping, and ambulance noises, telephone, and = barking dog noises from the synthesizer . <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_14c.15dabe48.2adc79e7_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: silence is golden From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2002 15:53:04 EDT     --part1_1a8.a3ff8f6.2adc7aa0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 10/14/02 2:13:36 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jonberts@magiccablepc.com writes:     > I also use appropriate program notes for the work, or if there's > not room in that Sunday's bulletin, may actually speak to the > congregation about the work before I play it   I have used "program notes" in the bulletin in the form of notes on all musical portions of the service. The congregation really liked this and = I received a lot of positive feedback. Occasionally, I have spoken briefly =   before beginning to play, and this seems to work best in the chatty denominations. Symbolism in music can be very powerful and can be = related to the readings, hymns, and even architectural appointments of the = building.   Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_1a8.a3ff8f6.2adc7aa0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 10/14/02 2:13:36 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jonberts@magiccablepc.com = writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I also use = appropriate program notes for the work, or if there's <BR>not room in that Sunday's bulletin, may actually speak to the <BR>congregation about the work before I play it</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I have used "program notes" in the bulletin in the form of notes on = all musical portions of the service. &nbsp;&nbsp;The congregation really = liked this and I received a lot of positive feedback. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Occasionally, I have spoken briefly before beginning to play, = and this seems to work best in the chatty denominations. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Symbolism in music can be very powerful and can be = related to the readings, hymns, and even architectural appointments of the = building. <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1a8.a3ff8f6.2adc7aa0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: silence is golden From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2002 16:01:30 EDT     --part1_127.1876bdff.2adc7c9a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Do many preachers really appreciate the music part of the service? During = a revival service, the pastor and revival preacher sat and visited audibly during all of the music, apparently not listening at all, but waiting for = it to be over. During a beautiful solo, accompanied by their chatter, I = looked at them and caught their eyes. They immediately sat up straighter and listened. But I get the feeling most revival preachers are just waiting = for the music to be over so they can get to the preaching. At another revival service I heard the preacher tell the visiting singer that if he did not = end his part of the service at a particularly time, he, the preacher, would = cut him short. I supposed that brings up another subject: do the musicians really appreciate the preaching? Lee   --part1_127.1876bdff.2adc7c9a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Do many preachers = really appreciate the music part of the service? &nbsp;During a revival = service, the pastor and revival preacher sat and visited audibly during = all of the music, apparently not listening at all, but waiting for it to = be over. &nbsp;During a beautiful solo, accompanied by their chatter, I = looked at them and caught their eyes. &nbsp;They immediately sat up = straighter and listened. &nbsp;But I get the feeling most revival = preachers are &nbsp;just waiting for the music to be over so they can get = to the preaching. At another revival service I heard the preacher tell the = visiting singer that if he did not end his part of the service at a = particularly time, he, the preacher, would cut him short. &nbsp;I supposed = that brings up another subject: do the musicians really appreciate the = preaching? &nbsp;&nbsp;Lee </FONT></HTML>   --part1_127.1876bdff.2adc7c9a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: "Swallowing" instruments From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2002 16:06:41 EDT   I do not understand the objection to incorporating existing pipework, even entire instruments, into new efforts. Obviously, if the quality of = the pipework or mechanism is dismal, they SHOULD be retired in the interests = of preserving the standards of the art. Some of the greatest pipe organs in history contain pipework from as = many as a half a dozen builders, as they have been absorbed into successive rebuilds. Discarding good pipework, or entire organs, devalues them, and is = another aspect of the death march of the pipe organ. If an organ is decent enough = to blithely give away as an act of Christian charity, then it is most likely good enough to quarry for components for its current owner, already an appreciative client. The emotional impact of continuity is of great importance to = congregants. Even if there is ONE rank of pipes left from the old organ, they feel = more tied to their history. Re-use a Pedal Bourdon -- Save a Forest!   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: silence is golden From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2002 16:35:09 -0400   On 10/14/02 1:44 PM, "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > Does that mean, Alan, that on ordindary green Sundays, only chorale = preludes > (as opposed, say, to 1 2-4 minute Rheinberger trio) are allowed? > Yes, Randy, it does. With the major exception of that very important = word, "allowed." As Lutherans, ANYthing is "allowed." But my ideal for a very ordinary green Sunday is that a little (or larger!) chorale prelude is enough, already.   How I came to that "position" (which I still hold only halfheartedly or = so): July 1955, I went to my very first "Church Music Conference" at the then-brand-new Lutheran seminary in Berkeley, Calif. At one point I took = in a workshop for organists. Each of us was invited to "play a prelude." I did the Little G Major. (Darn near my whole repertory.) The workshopist thanked me and complimented me kindly, and then asked, "And on what = occasion would you play this prelude?" I replied, "Any old Sunday morning." He = (and I have NO recollection of who it was; possibly Hugo Gehrke [Rod's = father]), responded, "No. It's too festive. That's for a bit "more" of a Sunday. For any old Sunday, just go with a chorale prelude."   Well, we don't do it that way either. Well, maybe 25 percent of the time, we do. More common among us is yesterday, when we had Henry Purcell's "Prelude in G Major" (well, he's a favorite of mine, but don't recall that he wrote c-p's on German chorales!). THEN the organist played a c-p on = the opening hymn. The congregation listened to it and (I really think) = followed the cantus firmus attentively, and during the final line stood and turned = to face the procession about to come up the aisle. And hit the opening chord with gusto, just to show that they know what's going on. At least one of our major hymns is treated just that way every Sunday; I think people = ENJOY the little head-game involved. (Our c-p's are probably half published things by Paul Manz, Bach, Charlie Ore, Walther, whoever, and half improvs by the cantor/organist. Often I do not know which it is.)   Our offertory anthem yesterday was the familiar Purcell "Rejoice in the = Lord Always." The postlude was Purcell's Rondeau from "Abdelzaer." So you = see, there was a nice thematic unity going. (Our postlude is quite often a c-p on the closing hymn.)   All the above opinions are held only lightly. Born in Pietism, I grew up = on laws about going to movies or playing cards on Sundays, so I'm FAR from a legalist (I hope).   Alan