PipeChat Digest #3195 - Friday, October 25, 2002
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #3194 - 10/24/02
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
EBAY LISTING
  by "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3194 - 10/24/02
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3194 - 10/24/02
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Casavant opus#163
  by "danielwh1" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Recital Annoucement - St. Louis - Highland, Illinois (x-post)
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net>
An "Enchanted Evening" - Andrew Henderson, St. Ignatius
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3194 - 10/24/02 From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2002 17:32:45 +0300   Thank you for the compliment, Greg. There are no organ builders in Greece and very few organs! There is a 4 manual organ by Klais in the concert = hall in Athens, a 2 manual tracker action instrument by Weigel in Katerini, = where I live (see my gallery - organs) and a small but effective Mascioni organ = in St Dennis's cathedral in Athens. I have posted details of the latter 2 on PIPORG-L. I have heard of an organ in the RC church in Rhodes and a 1 = manual in Corfu, but have not seen either of them. I am currently working on a project to get an organ installed in the concert hall in Litochoro, where = I have a house. If I can get enough money then it will be pipes, if not - well - I don't wish to start yet another discussion on this topic! My homepage is due for an update to include articles about the Katerini organ and the RC Cathedral in Athens, but, like most teachers, this is a busy = time of the year and I am a bit behind with this task. However rest assured I will notify the list of any updates! John Foss www.johnfoss.gr   Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3193 - 10/23/02 From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2002 13:26:14 EDT   John, What a neat website and life you live! Are there any significantly large instruments in Greece? Who is the most common builder? Greg.  
(back) Subject: EBAY LISTING From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2002 10:29:56 -0500   Just to let you know there is a Hinners Console for sale on Ebay. Let me know if you have any questions.   Just go to Ebay.com and search by item number 915787667.     Thanks, Robert    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3194 - 10/24/02 From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2002 12:14:38 -0400     > Thank you for the compliment, Greg. There are no organ builders in = Greece > and very few organs! There is a 4 manual organ by Klais in the concert hall > in Athens, a 2 manual tracker action instrument by Weigel in Katerini, where > I live (see my gallery - organs) and a small but effective Mascioni = organ in > St Dennis's cathedral in Athens. I have posted details of the latter 2 = on > PIPORG-L. I have heard of an organ in the RC church in Rhodes and a 1 manual > in Corfu, but have not seen either of them. I am currently working on a > project to get an organ installed in the concert hall in Litochoro, = where I > have a house. If I can get enough money then it will be pipes, if not - > well - I don't wish to start yet another discussion on this topic! My > homepage is due for an update to include articles about the Katerini = organ > and the RC Cathedral in Athens, but, like most teachers, this is a busy time > of the year and I am a bit behind with this task. However rest assured I > will notify the list of any updates! > John Foss   Hi, John,   Since you seem kindly disposed to respond to queries, I have a couple.   1) What kind of organ is that in your home? The console looks strangely familiar, yet I cannot quite place my finger on it.   2) If pipe organs are so rare as all that in Greece, then who takes care = of them? I wouldn't think there's be enough work to support a skilled and trained technician/tuner, and the other kind is frequently worse than no technician at all.   3) And, finally, the more "personal" question. Whatever brought someone who is as devoted as you seem to be to the cause of organs and organ music to a country like Greece, where organs are about as rare as hens' teeth? The country must have something else going for it, I would assume. I'd = find it awfully difficult to exist in a place like that, for that reason alone, = I must confess. One can, after all, spend only so much time gazing at the azure Agean sea!   With respect to your concert hall in Litochoro, if you cannot muster up = the funds for a pipe organ, you should carefully consider a Copeman Hart = digital instrument. I have a certain prejudice, since I sell them, but our respective locations would make it impossible for me, personally, to = profit from such a sale, in any event; however, I would be glad to put you in = touch with the proper parties who could help you. If you'd like to see, hear, = and play one in person, we have an installation in a cathedral on the island = of Malta, which isn't all that far away from you. If you'd like to pursue this, don't hesitate to let me know.   All good regards,   Dave Barton Baltimore, Maryland, USA    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3194 - 10/24/02 From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2002 12:27:42 EDT     --part1_161.162a9b74.2ae9797e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Lets not forget about Ktesibios of Alexandria with his hydraulis in 250 = b.c.! good day, jokingly, gregory   --part1_161.162a9b74.2ae9797e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Lets not forget about = Ktesibios of Alexandria with his hydraulis in 250 b.c.! <BR>good day, <BR>jokingly, <BR>gregory</FONT></HTML>   --part1_161.162a9b74.2ae9797e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Casavant opus#163 From: "danielwh1" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2002 21:59:36 -0300   Just reading the Provincial Paper the Chronicle Herald, Halifax NS I was pleased and surprised to turn a few pages to find a large Photo of the recently Restored Casavant Organ opus 163 built 1902 ,Originally installed at Robie Street Methodist later named St Andrews United Church = for $1,800.St. Andrew's now has Casavant 2106 installed in 1952 Opus 163 was moved shortly before the latter was installed, and was = moved to and installed in Gordon Providence United Church in Bridgetown NS = ,about 120 miles from Halifax for a total cost of $3,451.54. Opus #163 was releathered and cleaned and pipes repaired, tuned and voiced. the Organ has 750 pipes.The organ had never been revoiced for the building it was moved to, so that is one thing that also was done Replacement of the Pipe Organ was considered but at a cost of $200,000. = THe Restoration Option was chosen at a cost of $30,000 Hope all of you on the list find the above interesting. Danielwh 2000EP Biggs fellow     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.406 / Virus Database: 229 - Release Date: 21/10/2002    
(back) Subject: Recital Annoucement - St. Louis - Highland, Illinois (x-post) From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2002 20:04:34 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   --Boundary_(ID_V1ZUMHbWbp4UIKsR8ijq4g) Content-type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   The Wicks Organ Company of Highland, Illinois and the St. Louis =3D chapter of the American Guild of Organists will be presenting an organ =3D recital by Dr. Charles Callahan. This recital is in memory of Martin M. = =3D Wick, president of the Wicks Organ Company from 1942 to 2002, and will =3D be held in the tower of the Wicks Organ Company November 25, 2002 at 7:00 pm.=3D20 Dr. Callahan is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music in =3D Philadelphia, and the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. = =3D Well known through his prolific composing and performing, he is also the author of = =3D two books on American organ building, which have become standard =3D reference works. He is frequently called upon to act as consultant and = =3D tonal designer of new and to-be-restored pipe organs. The Archdiocese =3D of St. Louis commissioned Dr. Callahan to write the GLORIA for choir and = =3D orchestra for the 1999 Papal Mass in the TWA Dome. This and many of his = =3D other works are sung in parishes throughout the country. The St. Louis = =3D Symphony Orchestra gave the first performance of his MOSAICS, an =3D eighteen-minute symphonic suite for organ and orchestra. His choral =3D music has been performed in Westminster Abbey and St. Paul's Cathedral, = =3D London, Canterbury Cathedral, the Washington National Cathedral; Harvard = =3D University, St. Patrick's Cathedral, St. Thomas Church Fifth Avenue, and = =3D many churches throughout the world. Dr. Callahan serves as Director of = =3D Music of the Church of the Holy Family, the United Nations parish, New =3D York City.=3D20 Martin M. Wick died June 15, 2002 at the age of 82, in an accident = =3D while working at his home in Highland, Illinois. Son of Wicks Organ =3D Company Founder John Wick, Martin grew up building pipe organs, working = =3D alongside his father and his older brother John Henry Wick in developing = =3D new innovations in organ design and Direct-Electric action. At the age = =3D of 29 Martin was called to run the family business after the death of =3D his father. He is credited with leading the company through some of its = =3D toughest times. During World War II, Martin kept the shop open by retooling to =3D manufacture clock and airplane parts, and building new organs out of =3D existing materials. Mr. Wick was a talented organist and, although =3D organ building was his first love, enjoyed many other passions, =3D including flying and airplane building, boating, collecting antique =3D cars, being outdoors, being with his children and many grandchildren, =3D and working around his home. Martin took great pride in the Wicks Organ = =3D Company, and after 60 years still took time to walk through the shop and = =3D inspect details of every instrument, and to talk with his many =3D employees.   The recital is open to the public, and will be followed by a desert =3D reception and open house hosted by employees of the Wicks Organ Company.       --Boundary_(ID_V1ZUMHbWbp4UIKsR8ijq4g) Content-type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3DContent-Type content=3D"text/html; = charset=3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D"MSHTML 6.00.2719.2200" name=3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The Wicks Organ Company of Highland, = Illinois and the St. Louis chapter of the American Guild of Organists will be = presenting an organ recital by Dr. Charles Callahan.&nbsp; This recital is in memory of = Martin M. Wick, president of the Wicks Organ Company from 1942 to 2002, and will = be held in the tower of<BR>the Wicks Organ Company November 25, 2002 at 7:00 = pm. </DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Dr. Callahan is a graduate of the Curtis = Institute of Music in Philadelphia, and the Catholic University of America in = Washington, D.C.&nbsp; Well known<BR>through his prolific composing and performing, he is also the author of two books on American organ building, which have become =   standard reference works.&nbsp; He is frequently called upon to act as consultant and tonal designer of new and to-be-restored pipe organs.&nbsp; = The Archdiocese of St. Louis commissioned Dr. Callahan to write the GLORIA for = choir and orchestra for the 1999 Papal Mass in the TWA Dome.&nbsp; This and many = of his other works are sung in parishes throughout the country.&nbsp; The St. = Louis Symphony Orchestra gave the first performance of his MOSAICS, an = eighteen-minute symphonic suite for organ and orchestra.&nbsp; His choral music has been performed in Westminster Abbey and St. Paul's Cathedral, London, = Canterbury Cathedral, the Washington National Cathedral; Harvard University, St. = Patrick's Cathedral, St. Thomas Church Fifth Avenue, and many churches throughout = the world.&nbsp; Dr. Callahan serves as Director of Music of the Church of the = Holy Family, the United Nations parish, New York City. </DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Martin M. Wick died June 15, 2002 at the age = of 82, in an accident while working at his home in Highland, Illinois.&nbsp; = Son of Wicks Organ Company Founder John Wick, Martin grew up building pipe&nbsp; organs, working alongside his father and his older brother John Henry Wick = in developing new innovations in organ design and Direct-Electric = action.&nbsp; At the age of 29 Martin was called to run the family business after the death = of his father.&nbsp; He is credited with leading the company through some of = its toughest times.<BR>During World War II, Martin kept the shop open by = retooling to manufacture clock and airplane parts, and building new organs out of = existing materials.&nbsp; Mr. Wick was a talented organist and, although organ = building was his first love, enjoyed many other passions, including flying and = airplane building, boating, collecting antique cars, being outdoors, being with his =   children and many grandchildren, and working around his home.&nbsp; Martin = took great pride in the Wicks Organ Company, and after 60 years still took time = to walk through the shop and inspect details of every instrument, and to talk = with his many employees.<BR></DIV> <DIV>The recital is open to the public, and will be followed by a desert reception and open house hosted by employees of the Wicks Organ Company.<BR><BR></DIV></BODY></HTML>   --Boundary_(ID_V1ZUMHbWbp4UIKsR8ijq4g)--  
(back) Subject: An "Enchanted Evening" - Andrew Henderson, St. Ignatius From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 25 Oct 2002 02:33:48 -0400   An "Enchanted Evening" - Andrew Henderson St. Ignatius Loyola, NYC 9/29/02 at 4 p.m.   Kent Tritle appeared at the Lectern, made an announcement about future events, thanked all for coming, and then asked us to join in welcoming Andrew Henderson, Assistant Organist at St. Ignatius since September of 2001. We all applauded cheerfully, and turned back to the balcony to await the artist, who seemed to have gone missing. Kent, cellphone in hand (and speakerphone on), called the church switchboard, and asked for the music office. After some ringing, Andrew was heard to say something like he was = on the way, and soon, there he was, to renewed applause. I was convinced they had practiced this bit of fun, but it was apparently totally spontaneous, and was perhaps a first in the history of the organ recital. It certainly put everyone in a thoroughly relaxed mood, and there could have been no clearer reminder to all about turning off cellphone ringers.   In writing about the 18 performers at the Atlanta Semifinal Round of the Calgary Competition, I mentioned that some of them possessed a kind of extra-musical charisma that gave them a certain amount of audience appeal before they played a note. Andrew, the quiet scholar-musician, can win = over any audience - he just needs to begin playing first. There is magic and = fire in those fingertips, a pure, musical charisma, fully in play on this occasion!   I am not sure on what basis Andrew decided to play some of his program = from memory, and some using music. In the course of one of the several = memorized major works, he had a momentary memory lapse, and did as we were all = taught to do, and gently cadenced, and returned to the nearest "starting place." = In this case, that happened to be the beginning, and it was of no moment whatsoever, and he went on to give a terrific performance of the movement. = I am sure many were not even aware.   He began with a very large Buxtehude work I did not know - Te Deum = Laudamus, described as a Chant Fantasia. There are five sections: a Praeludium; Te Deum laudamus; Pleni sunt coeli et terra; Te Martyrum; and Tu devicto. Quoting Mr. Henderson's excellent program notes: This work (BuxWV218) "is Buxtehude's longest and perhaps most complex <oeuvre> in a keyboard genre. The work is sophisticated in its integration of the <Te Deum> chant and = yet retains a quasi-improvisational freshness, all the while allowing for an expansive and colorful use of the organ's sound resources." This was all played with wonderful precision, clarity, and sensitivity. It was every = bit as riveting as a virtuosic performance of any great blockbuster piece - = it's a different sort of virtuosity, but a very great achievement - I was on = the edge of my seat the whole time. Add to this the fact of some very = inventive and colorful registrations. I am sure that in one variation, I heard the = 16' English Horn up an octave as a solo. Also, the Great Mounted Cornet came into play. The ending was registered boldly, for a tremendously dramatic close. The audience was clearly absorbed in the music throughout, and when released from the spell, let their feelings be known.   Three English Pieces: 1. "Uppon 'La Mi Re'" . . . . Anonymous (c. 1550). Over a drone-like slow ostinato repetition of those pitches, La Mi Re, wondrously and more softly echoed at the fifth below, (a hypnotically powerful effect), there is a = very fast-moving, quite high-pitched, running florid line, almost bird like. I found out later that I was not the only one that thought "Messiaen!" In discussions with an English musicologist, Andrew learned that some think = the original key of this piece, and others of its ilk and time, should be a fifth higher. Despite the fact that it is not mentioned in this organ's Owner's Manual, Andrew found the Automatic Transposer. It's a clever = device, and has been given the fanciful name "Nazard!" He used it well, played = down one octave. 2. "The Queenes Alman" . . . William Byrd (1543-1623). To quote again Andrew's excellent notes: "The Queenes Alman is founded on a bass pattern co mmon to sixteenth-century compositions, a so-called <passamezzo antico> bass. Both parts of this bi-partite bass are repeated, with subtle embellishments, and Byrd provides two further variations in much the same format." So, a stately dance with several variations, and a wonderful variety of imaginatively chosen colors. 3. "Why Aske Yee?" What an astonishingly intricate set of variations, apparently based upon a folk tune as yet undiscovered in its original = form. The manuscript is in the Paris Conservatory. It is generic keyboard music, but the notes suggest that, as many wealthy French music lovers had small, one-manual Organs in their homes, it would have often been heard on such instruments. The resources of the St. Ignatius instrument were ingeniously but tastefully exploited.   Bach - Prelude & Fugue in E Minor, "The Wedge" This piece is sometimes used as a racecourse, or as a showplace for deft manual and registration change. A case can be made for some changing of manuals, and a case can also be made for staying in one place. This is a work of immense power and dignity, and does not want trivialization. = Andrew began the Prelude at a dignified pace - very strong & articulate. His deep commitment to this music is clear and contagious. There was drive and excitement in the tempo of the Fugue. The performance of the complete work was a magnificent edifice, equal to the wonder of this early 18th century masterpiece.   Intermission   Leo Sowerby - Toccata. I did not know this whirlwind perpetual motion = piece. My fault. Google lists a goodly number of recordings that include it. It = is wonderful to be so versatile, playing both "La Mi Re" and Sowerby! A biographical moment here: Andrew, from Thorold, Ontario, studied privately in his native Canada, earned a BA at Cambridge, serving as Organ Scholar = at Clare College, on full scholarship earned a Master's at Yale, and now, is the C. V. Starr Doctoral Fellow at Juilliard. With this impressively checkered past, he has not shied away from tackling taxing and significant American Organ music. In addition to the Sowerby of today, I have twice heard him play the Five Dances of Calvin Hampton. To whatever he plays, he gives his all. He is the precise and passionate servant of whatever music = he presents. Upon the posthumous publication of my as yet unwritten Sonata Fantastica, I hope Andrew might be its first interpreter.   This Organ digs Widor, as does this performer. He brought us two movements of the Fourth Symphony that were added for the 1887 edition, joining the four original movements. I happily play the Finale of this symphony, and = now I think I need to at least add the Andante Cantabile, which was next on = the program. It is a truly beautiful movement. There were moments when a left hand combination sounded like an Organ Harp, and I think it was beginning = at the double bar in measure 50. This movement rather reminds me of the slow movement of the Pathetique, and Andrew quotes John Near as suggesting that both it and the following movement are reminiscent of Mendelssohn, the Andante - Songs Without Words, and the Scherzo which we heard next - the Scherzo from the Midsummer Night's Dream Music. I had not heard this Widor Scherzo. It is amazing. In both of these movements, the combination of player, music, Organ, and acoustic made for a stunning experience.   Who among us does not treasure every measure of every published work of Maurice Durufle? He was a severe self critic, and left a number of works unpublished, deeming them unworthy. We know of one piece that got away, = the Toccata from the Opus 5 Suite. He repudiated it, and his wife, who did not share this dislike, taught the work to students only when he was not = around, and I think time has shown that she was right to do so. It is a powerful = and amazing work. Frederic Blanc, one of the last pupils of Madame Durufle, is bringing to publication some works which the Master did not approve for publication, a judgement softened by time. Andrew had the honor of presenting, and we of hearing, the New York premiere of <Meditation,> just published by Durand. Its first performance was given by M. Blanc at Notre Dame de Paris, and a subsequent performance was at Southern Methodist University in Texas. Our program notes point out that the first theme of = the Agnus Dei of the Durufle Messe cum Jubilo is from this very Meditation. = The entire Messe cum Jubilo will be heard in a concert at St. Ignatius on = March 19th, 2003, at 8 p.m.   The last work on the program was the Dupre B Major Prelude and Fugue (Opus 7). I have a funny memory of creating a slight disturbance by gasping out loud when, as a student at Oberlin, I first heard the wonderfully mad = Fugue subject of this work! I still stand in awe of the whole piece, and = therefore in awe of Andrew Henderson, who plays it with such assurance, excitement, and seeming ease.   The audience loudly required an encore, and Andrew obliged with the Finale from the Vierne 1st Symphony. I wondered just a bit if we might continue = the recent trend of Pedal interpolations. I knew there would not be Felix's = "I' ve Been Working on the Railroad," or Malcolm Archer's "Auld Lang Syne" (at that time of year), but I had worked out that a fragment of "O Canada" = could be made to work, or possibly the well-known Thorold High School Fight = Song. No, we got it unadorned, but absolutely full of excitement - a wonderful = way to be sent home after yet another recital added to many rich musical memories granted us in this hallowed place.   It now being a bit after 2 a.m. Friday, I can say that later today, I = shall be back at St. Ignatius for a concert including the Mozart C Minor Mass, a Domenico Scarlatti Te Deum Laudamus (certainly new to me), and the blessed Cantata 78 of J. S. Bach. Christine Hoffman, Music Administrator, has already posted about this concert on both Organ lists. It's at 8 p.m., 980 Park Avenue.   Off to bed,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com