PipeChat Digest #3203 - Thursday, October 31, 2002
 
Looking for Recommendations
  by "Tracy Wilding, Mel Bay Publications, Inc." <tracy@melbay.com>
Re: Looking for Recommendations
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
RE: Organs in Nassau and Great Stirrup Cay
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Quintaton
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Funeral Music
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Looking for Recommendations
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
How To, Or How Not To, Get a New Organ-An Essay
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Looking for Recommendations
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Two mysteries for Halloween
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Two mysteries for Halloween
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Quintaton
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Quintaton
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Quintaton
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: 5 manual organs - where less is more
  by <MyrtleBeachMusic@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Looking for Recommendations From: "Tracy Wilding, Mel Bay Publications, Inc." <tracy@melbay.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 09:15:58 -0600   I am playing for a 100-th anniversary celebration of an organization next year. I think it would be interesting to have music from 1903 and 2003. = Can anyone recommend a piece or composer from 1903?   Thanks    
(back) Subject: Re: Looking for Recommendations From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 09:54:04 -0600   Max Reger: Op. 69, 73, and more.   It might be more fun or more of a challenge if you narrowed the field a bit ... like British composers only, or whatever.   Bob Lind who is planning on writing some 2003 organ works any day now           "Tracy Wilding, Mel Bay Publications, Inc." <tracy@melbay.com>     I am playing for a 100-th anniversary celebration of an organization next year. I think it would be interesting to have music from 1903 and 2003. Can anyone recommend a piece or composer from 1903?   Thanks    
(back) Subject: RE: Organs in Nassau and Great Stirrup Cay From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 11:09:32 -0500   I played the organ in Nassau Cathedral ca. 1970. As I recall, it was a three-manual J.W. Walker with a stop-tab console. The console was on the north side of the chancel, but the pipes were in the rear gallery. The dedication recital had been played by Sir William McKie. Virgil Fox had also played it.   This organ has since been replaced-- can't recall by whom, but I remember thinking from the announcement that it is probably very fine work and = worth some effort to see, hear, and play.   Ever since that two- or three-week summer visit to Florida and the = Bahamas, I have liked, or at least tolerated, warm-to-hot weather better, = apparently, than most Wisconsin natives. I found it rather oppressive at the time, as though the heat of the sunlight were sometimes so intense that it = literally pushed one into the ground, but thereafter I never minded heat that the = rest of my family might complain about.    
(back) Subject: Quintaton From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 17:04:54 -0000   To help with my English Organ soundfont I would appreciate some advice regarding the sound and use of the Quintaton - in the context of a typical 'un-baroque' English style organ. The names Quintadena and Quintaten seem = to be synonymous.   Specifications I have seen seem to favour it's use on manuals and pedal at 16 ft, less frequently at 8 ft., never(?) at a higher pitch. Why 16 ft, I wonder.? On a four manual (Choir, Great, Swell and Solo + Pedal) organ, where would you expect to find it ?   What would be its musical use - in combination with which other stops, as = a solo stop, or chorus stop.? How would it compare in volume and timbre with the sounds of, say, a mf Great Stopped Diapason and a p Swell Stopped Flute, which seem to be its nearest relatives.   I know the answers will be full of if and buts and 'it depends', but this = is a stop of which I have no personal experience, and I do need some input. I can create (synthesise) the stop to sound how I wish and I don't want to = be too wide of the mark.   Many thanks,   Bruce Miles   PS My present 'English Organ' is a free download at www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk                  
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral Music From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 17:16:14 -0000   Many thanks for all the suggestions for this. All I cannot use, some I certainly will.   My plans went badly adrift yesterday afternoon. I arrived only 20 minutes before the funeral service because of road works traffic hold up. Never mind, said our minister, the coffin is bound to be late - it's arriving = from the same direction. But no, it was 5 minutes early. So just time for a = quick burst of Handel's Largo to see the procession in.   Regards to all.   Bruce Miles    
(back) Subject: Re: Looking for Recommendations From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 11:57:50 -0500   Horatio Parker, though the organ sonata is 1908. His organ concerto, however, was Dec 1902 and thus is 100 years old at the close of thise = year. I may have an organ-only adaptation of some of that work, if you're interested.   Petro Yon cam to America in 1907; close enough?   Will Macfarlane was at St. Thomas Ch, NJYC 1900 - 1913. Any organ music by him? Perhaps the good folk at St. Thomas Church could respond to this qustion.   Samuel Warren, an AGO founder, was around NYC (I think) until his death in 1915. Did he leave orogan music?   In 1902 G. Schirmer publisehd a transcritpion of the "Liebstod" from _Tristan und Isolde_ (Richard Wagner) by Archer Gibson (1895 - 1952, of = whom I know nothing else. Organ transcriptions were all the rage in 1903, so that would be a very authethentic sort of thing to play, in terms of what Americans were hearing from the organ in those days.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   > From: "Tracy Wilding, Mel Bay Publications, Inc." <tracy@melbay.com> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 09:15:58 -0600 > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Looking for Recommendations > > I am playing for a 100-th anniversary celebration of an organization = next > year. I think it would be interesting to have music from 1903 and 2003. = Can > anyone recommend a piece or composer from 1903? > > Thanks > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: How To, Or How Not To, Get a New Organ-An Essay From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 12:58:31 -0500   Dear Lists & Friends,       How to dodge just a wee bit the rules of the Pipe Organ lists about = sticking to Organ matters, so I can share some of the considerable excitement generated by last Friday's concert at St. Ignatius Loyola in Manhattan? Well, here goes. Well-known consummate artist at the Organ, Nancianne Parrella, gave a concert last night, using the excellent three-stop Klopp continuo Organ. The repertoire included a Te Deum by Domenico Scarlatti, Bach Cantata No. 78, and after an intermission, the great Mozart C Minor Mass. Mrs. Parrella was assisted by a large orchestra and chorus, = conducted by Kent Tritle, Director of Music Ministries at the church. How's that for an artful dodge?       I thought of a number of things during this magnificent concert, in which not one note was heard from the large Organ in the rear gallery. One question is quite legit for this list - how did Kent Tritle manage to get the Mander Organ you have all heard about, although surely not from me?<G> The question is worth asking, because when he went there in 1989, not only was there not a real Organ in sight, but there was really no one thinking about it either. Well, concerts very like this evening's had something to = do with it. He set about presenting the greatest sacred music in the best way he could, *with the resources at hand.* Having shown his mettle and resourcefulness, in addition to his ability to bring singers, players, congregation, and clergy into his vision, he received a great and generous gift, handed directly to him as he walked down the nave aisle after = church, to make it possible to consider seriously plans for a Pipe Organ. We and others were contacted for Organ proposals, and I trotted on up to New York with the letter in hand, and asked at the reception desk for Mr. Tritle, = but I pronounced it like Trittle. His reaction to my innocent gaffe was to simply take a pencil, and assuming correctly that I had had some basic German during my schooling, he wrote on paper T-R-E-I-T-L, the German antecedent of the present spelling. I never, of course, forgot the pronunciation, but not also the gentle method of its teaching! I began to attend regularly the initial offerings in what became Sacred Music in a Sacred Space. I well recall one long, rainy drive from Baltimore to New York, to hear the Bruckner Te Deum - the rain was horizontal in the wind, but the place was packed, and the performance was really electric - big orchestra and chorus, and a few unfortunate blasts, courtesy of Chris Creaghan, on the pretend Organ. It was April 1993 before we had the honor = of completing an Organ in this great church, and in April of 2003, the anniversary will be duly celebrated.       There is a little parallel here to the story of a friend, one of my fellow 44 Organ students at Oberlin in the 50s. In Organ Class, he told us of his plan to get rid of the unlovely old and troubled Moller in his church. He described in great detail and with pride one of several dramas he had presented on various Sundays. He could be seen at the console, but the keyboards were not visible, so it was easy during the pastoral prayer to insert a pencil properly to create a cipher. It was not loud enough to = stop the prayers, but sufficient to be very annoying. With pretend inconspicuousness, he moved into the chamber, made a few banging noises, during which he pulled the pipe, and the noise stopped. He exited the chamber, with kind of an heroic "phew" gesture, and returned to the = console just as everyone said "Amen." He told us it was his way of making sure the congregation knew that the organ needed to be replaced. The walls of old Warner blistered as a powerful lecture ensued. "In the long run, if you = work hard, nurturing and building the church's choir, and making that old hag from Hagerstown sound the very best it can, you will be trusted and = believed when you tell these good church people, who now know you are of them, not above them, that the church's life, musical and otherwise, will be vastly improved with a fine new instrument!" There was some other rather heated talk about the stupidity and immorality of "making ciphers," words I = happen to know that young man has never forgotten.       A propos of none of this: I sit in St. Ignatius, that gorgeous church, and Malcolm the Terrible becomes remarkably mellow and docile, kind of the "Diapasons Become Strings" effect! After the Scarlatti and Bach, I settled into the great Mozart C Minor Mass, and realized, with all the Mozart letters I have read, the biographies, and F. Murray Abraham, one meets and recognizes Mozart the man and musical mind in the opening choral bars of = the C Minor, just in that wonderful little squiggly melisma, about six or = seven notes in the Kyrie, depending upon how you count. Face to face with pure, unadulterated beauty and an astonishing musical mind! That's enough to = keep one going until the next time.       Cheers,       Malcolm Wechsler   www.mander-organs.com                      
(back) Subject: Re: Looking for Recommendations From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 18:10:59 -0000   Tracy,   What's the context - church, concert hall, theatre.??   There's a useful publication 'Directory of Popular Music by Leslie Lowe published by Music Master UK' which includes a chronological index. One of the entries for 1903 is Victor Herbert's 'March of the Toys', excellent organ fodder.   Bruce Miles   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, October 31, 2002 3:54 PM Subject: Re: Looking for Recommendations     > Max Reger: Op. 69, 73, and more. > > It might be more fun or more of a challenge > if you narrowed the field a bit ... like British composers only, or > whatever. > > Bob Lind > who is planning on writing some 2003 organ > works any day now > > > > > > "Tracy Wilding, Mel Bay Publications, Inc." <tracy@melbay.com> > > > > > I am playing for a 100-th anniversary > celebration of an organization next > year. I think it would be interesting to > have music from 1903 and 2003. Can > anyone recommend a piece or composer from > 1903? > > Thanks > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Two mysteries for Halloween From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 12:31:19 -0600   I have found that absence does make the heart grow fonder - all eight of the cats on the farm have been seriously in love with Rick and me since we returned home from our 3-day whirl to Callaway Gardens. It is hard to check e-mail because I cannot see the screen through Malachi's body, and he keeps wanting to lie down on the keyboard. The vacation was not as restful as I'd hoped, and I was glad to make it home. I had seen all the really-red clay I wanted to see for a while.   During this trip we toured the various venues offered by the Gardens, including the golf course (making it there just as the Buick Open was finishing up a little soggily), made plans for some fly-fishing adventures later, got idease for our own greenhouse/fish pond projects, visited Warm Springs and the Little White House, and Columbus with its Harley-Davidson store, and Plains with the whole town as a historic site/museum (alas, Jimmy and Roslyn were not home, but we had greens and rutabagas at Mom's Kitchen).   Two questions about Southwest Georgia:   (1) While at Callaway, there was a charming little chapel (don't think it could seat more than 100) called the Ada Cason Callaway Memorial Chapel. There was an organ, the console with a roll-top much like an Allen. It was of course locked up, but looked like it could hold three manuals. There was no one to ask about the organ, and no information that I could find on-line or at the Gardens about it. However, there was a small tower resembling a carillon, and in the corner of the church was a room (also locked up) and some metal horizontal closed shutters much like the ones up in the tower. On a bulletin board in a tiny office was an organ recital schedule - apparently there are recitals from 3-5 pm on Saturdays and Sundays - no name of recitalist or organist.   Question: does anyone know about this organ, what it is, and whether there is a carillon?   (2) One does not accidentally end up in Plains, Georgia - you can't get there from here, and have to plan ending up at such a place. I have to change the sobriquet of DeFuniak from "the land that time forgot and the decades have not improved", because it is at least just off an interstate. This place really has not changed.   During our lunch at Mom's kitchen, Rick and I started talking about the church the Carters attend, Maranatha Baptist Church, where he teaches Sunday School. We speculated on what sort of organ this church might have; this speculation turned into a bet. I said there was no way it would be a pipe organ. He said there would be no organ at all. I said there would be an electronic organ, 2 or 3 manuals. He said at most there would be a tiny spinet organ.   Well, the wager was on - Rick had been drooling over a router table at Lowe's, and I wanted a music case or corner china cabinet. So we found the Maranatha Baptist Church, which was locked up tighter than a drum with no office hours and nobody in attendance. It was a typical Deep South Baptist Church with low ceilings, so I know there was not space for a pipe organ.   Question: does anyone know what type organ, if any, is found at the former President's church?   Two mysteries for Halloween,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Two mysteries for Halloween From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 13:53:03 -0500   On 10/31/02 1:31 PM, "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > Question: does anyone know what type organ, if any, is found at the > former President's church? > Glenda, find a website for his Presidential Library, and drop the question on them. They'll say, "Oh, Sister Gertrude will certainly know; give this to her." And she will.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Quintaton From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 13:05:32 -0600   Bruce Miles wrote: =20 > To help with my English Organ soundfont I would appreciate some advice > regarding the sound and use of the Quintaton - in the context of a typi= cal > 'un-baroque' English style organ. The names Quintadena and Quintaten se= em to > be synonymous.     > What would be its musical use - in combination with which other stops, = as a > solo stop, or chorus stop.? > How would it compare in volume and timbre with the sounds of, say, a mf > Great Stopped Diapason and a p Swell Stopped Flute, which seem to be it= s > nearest relatives.   The best musical use of a Quintation/Quintadena, etc. is OFF.=20 Seriously: it is great as a sub-unison stop to give "gravity" to an ensemble without heaviness. It can also be used with an 8' Prestant/Principal/whatever to help "thicken" its sound for solo use -again, without adding heaviness or in of itself being overbearing.   It's also nice, either individually or adaptively, to use as a 16' Pedal stop.   It is usually thinner, but as its name implies: quintier than the sound of a typical stopped flute/Stopped Diapason or Rohr Fl=F6te. Truthfully: its usefulness musically is limited, but if it is there, then by all means, take advantage of it. =20 > I know the answers will be full of if and buts and 'it depends', but th= is is > a stop of which I have no personal experience, and I do need some input= .. I > can create (synthesise) the stop to sound how I wish and I don't want t= o be > too wide of the mark.   Hopefully, this helps.   Good luck!   Faithfully,   Grandpa Arp (who's guilty of including at least more than one Quintadena in his organ specifications in the "dim dark past"!) =20 --=20 Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: Re: Quintaton From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 14:58:13 EST     --part1_131.16556ac8.2af2e555_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 10/31/02 12:18:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk writes:     > Specifications I have seen seem to favour it's use on manuals and pedal = at > 16 ft, less frequently at 8 ft., never(?) at a higher pitch.   The most successful Quintadenas I've seen have been at unison pitch. It works well as a solo stop, sometimes in place of an oboe. A Quintadena = 8 and a flute 4 is a very clear combination for a quiet fugue or a solo = voice. Quintadenas work well in colouring a group of stops and also adds = solidity to the chorus. I have seen specifications with the Quintadena at 4'. Most often, the Quintadena was in the Choir or Swell division.   It was not until the baroque revival organ began to appear that = Quintadenas began to appear at 16, usually on the Great. As noted above, it provides =   solidity to the chorus and (as Harrison and/or Biggs said) adds gravity without weight.   Personally, I prefer a Quintadena as a unison stop because I want weight = and fullness in the 16 manual stop. The organ I now play has a 16 = Quintadena on the Great/Pedal. I use it primarily for two purposes: on the Great = as a solo or unison stop; on the Pedal to add strength to the Subbass 16 = since we lack a 16 Principal. When I want a 16 manual sound I usually couple the Swell Rohrflote at 16.     Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_131.16556ac8.2af2e555_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 10/31/02 12:18:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk = writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Specifications I = have seen seem to favour it's use on manuals and pedal at <BR>16 ft, less frequently at 8 ft., never(?) at a higher pitch. = </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>The most successful Quintadenas I've seen have been at unison pitch. = &nbsp;&nbsp;It works well as a solo stop, sometimes in place of an oboe. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;A Quintadena 8 and a flute 4 is a very clear = combination for a quiet fugue or a solo voice. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Quintadenas work well in colouring a group of stops and = also adds solidity to the chorus. &nbsp;&nbsp;I have seen specifications = with the Quintadena at 4'. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Most often, the Quintadena = was in the Choir or Swell division. <BR> <BR>It was not until the baroque revival organ began to appear that = Quintadenas began to appear at 16, usually on the Great. &nbsp;&nbsp;As = noted above, it provides solidity to the chorus and (as Harrison and/or = Biggs said) adds gravity without weight. &nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR>Personally, I prefer a Quintadena as a unison stop because I want = weight and fullness in the 16 manual stop. = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The organ I now play has a 16 Quintadena on = the Great/Pedal. &nbsp;&nbsp;I use it primarily for two purposes: = &nbsp;&nbsp;on the Great as a solo or unison stop; on the Pedal to add = strength to the Subbass 16 since we lack a 16 Principal. <BR>When I want a 16 manual sound I usually couple the Swell Rohrflote at = 16. <BR> <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_131.16556ac8.2af2e555_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Quintaton From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 1 Nov 2002 10:33:46 +1300   The two Quintatons I am most familiar with are very different. One is an = 8ft metal stopped flute of large scale, the only 8ft flute in the Swell = division of a 20rk 2m organ of 32 stops. It is an awful sound, not blending with anything, and dates from 1962. The designer of this organ said that by having an 8ft with "Twelfth" in the tone, her wouldn't need to have a separate Twelfth. The result is worse than could be imagined.   The other is a TenC 16ft wooden stopt rank dating from 1878 and by a NZ builder. It is an extraordinarily beautiful stop - warm and rich, with a hint of chiff above MidC, where the quintiness begins as well. This is in the Swell of a 21rk 2m organ of which the Great was built in 1865 and the Swell in 1878. I'd be utterly thrilled to hear this wooden Quintaton unenclosed at 8ft, instead of being buried on the back slide of an 11rk Swell deep inside a small chancel chamber in a church that only seats 100. = A magnificent rank.   So, there were, in NZ at least, Quintatons being made before the Baroque revival.   In Wellington Town Hall, a 4/57 from 1906 by Norman & Beard, the Choir = says it has a Quintaton at 8ft, but it was found to be awful and was = immediately swopped for a big metal chimney flute. The knob was never changed.   Ross -----Original Message----- From: Cremona502@cs.com <Cremona502@cs.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, November 01, 2002 8:59 AM Subject: Re: Quintaton     In a message dated 10/31/02 12:18:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk writes:       Specifications I have seen seem to favour it's use on manuals and = pedal at 16 ft, less frequently at 8 ft., never(?) at a higher pitch.     The most successful Quintadenas I've seen have been at unison pitch. = It works well as a solo stop, sometimes in place of an oboe. A Quintadena = 8 and a flute 4 is a very clear combination for a quiet fugue or a solo = voice. Quintadenas work well in colouring a group of stops and also adds solidity = t o the chorus. I have seen specifications with the Quintadena at 4'. Most often, the Quintadena was in the Choir or Swell division.   It was not until the baroque revival organ began to appear that Quintadenas began to appear at 16, usually on the Great. As noted above, it provides solidity to the chorus and (as Harrison and/or Biggs said) = adds gravity without weight.   Personally, I prefer a Quintadena as a unison stop because I want weight and fullness in the 16 manual stop. The organ I now play has a 16 Quintadena on the Great/Pedal. I use it primarily for two purposes: on the Great as a solo or unison stop; on the Pedal to add strength to the Subbass 16 since we lack a 16 Principal. When I want a 16 manual sound I usually couple the Swell Rohrflote at = 16.     Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ...an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053    
(back) Subject: Re: 5 manual organs - where less is more From: <MyrtleBeachMusic@aol.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 16:09:39 EST     --part1_36.306a4fc9.2af2f613_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Well, as one who plays a five-manual organ, I find it useful. No, you = don't use it as much as the lower ones, and yes you usually couple those = resident divisions down when you're using a large registration, but for solo work = and such, I would be disappointed if it wasn't there.   Jeremy   In a message dated 10/27/2002 7:13:36 AM Eastern Standard Time, musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk writes:   > This is an attitude with which I concur > (speaking as another fifth-manual-deprived player) > > Harry (musicman) > > -----Original Message----- > From: Karl Moyer <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: 26 October 2002 18:19 > Subject: Re: 5 manual organ > > > > Perhaps I'm missing something, but I've tended to agree with what I > >heard as a college student, that what you can't do on a four-manual = organ > is > >not worth trying. The fifth manual on the five-manual consoles I've > played > >was more a nuisance than an asset. > > > > Karl E. Moyer > > Lancaster PA     --part1_36.306a4fc9.2af2f613_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Well, as one who plays a five-manual organ, I = find it useful.&nbsp; No, you don't use it as much as the lower ones, and = yes you usually couple those resident divisions down when you're using a = large registration, but for solo work and such, I would be disappointed if = it wasn't there.<BR> <BR> Jeremy<BR> <BR> In a message dated 10/27/2002 7:13:36 AM Eastern Standard Time, = musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">This is an = attitude with which I concur<BR> (speaking as another fifth-manual-deprived player)<BR> <BR> Harry (musicman)<BR> <BR> -----Original Message-----<BR> From: Karl Moyer &lt;kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu&gt;<BR> To: PipeChat &lt;pipechat@pipechat.org&gt;<BR> Date: 26 October 2002 18:19<BR> Subject: Re: 5 manual organ<BR> <BR> <BR> &gt;&nbsp; Perhaps I'm missing something, but I've tended to agree with = what I<BR> &gt;heard as a college student, that what you can't do on a four-manual = organ<BR> is<BR> &gt;not worth trying.&nbsp; The fifth manual on the five-manual consoles = I've played<BR> &gt;was more a nuisance than an asset.<BR> &gt;<BR> &gt;&nbsp; Karl E. Moyer<BR> &gt;&nbsp; Lancaster PA</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_36.306a4fc9.2af2f613_boundary--