PipeChat Digest #3204 - Thursday, October 31, 2002
 
Re: Quintaton
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Estey Organs in new Book & CD
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Two mysteries for Halloween
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
2' Quintaton
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
Re: Two mysteries for Halloween
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Quintaton
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Quintaton
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Quintaton
  by <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: Quintaton
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Ken Cowan in Kalamazoo
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
ALL SOULS, ST. LOUIS, AUSTIN TX
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Ken Cowan in Kalamazoo
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Excitement in Kalamazoo with Ken Cowan (a wee bit long)
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Chop goes the Copy/Paste
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Quintaton From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 16:42:01 EST   Dear Mr. Miles: The 8' Quintaton (Quintadena, Quintade, etc.) is most often a capped metal flute of narrow scale with very low cut-ups, attenuating the fundamental in favor of a prominent twelfth. The twelfth, or third = harmonic, corresponds to the 2-2/3' pitch, since capped and stopped flutes do not produce even-numbered harmonics. They were a favorite of American builders during the middle of the = last century as a "light" 16' manual register. The only problem was that they = gave an asthmatic, gravely contraquint at 5-1/3', which sounds pretty ugly = without providing any dignity or majesty. In later decades, this has given way to = the return to 16' Bourdons of larger scale and more fundamental, as well as = more open 16' manual tone. I find them of little use in the Pedal at 16' pitch, =   since the rasping quint at the expense of the fundamental doesn't really = add much except some harmonic noise. Wooden examples DO exist, and at 4' pitch were frequently called = "Nason Flute". Metal Quintadenas at 4' pitch were a favorite of consultant and = theorist James B. Jamison, as he felt that the strong 1-1/3' component heard in = their sound, when used with mezzo-forte fluework, produced a pseudo = "Kleinemixtur" effect. They can be found in some of the surviving instruments he designed =   for Austin. Sebastian Matthaus Gluck Tonal Director, Gluck New York, Pipe Organ Restorers and Builders Editor, The Journal of American Organbuilding  
(back) Subject: Estey Organs in new Book & CD From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 18:12:18 -0500   "Manufacturing the Muse: Estey Organs & Consumer Culture in Victorian America" is a 356-page book by Dennis G. Waring, published this year, that also includes a CD of 10 Estey reed organs and two Estey pipe organs. It = is the only CD devoted to Estey that I know. The book tells the history of = the Estey firm and more. Larger descriptions appear at http://www.ohscatalog.org on the opening page.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: Two mysteries for Halloween From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 17:14:16 -0600   At 12:31 PM -0600 10/31/2002, Glenda wrote: >Question: does anyone know about this organ, what it is, and whether >there is a carillon?   Glenda   The organ is a Moiller that has been rebuilt by AE Schlueter. According to my info it is a 3 manual, 24 rank instrument with 60 stops.   I check with a friend down in that area and he things the Carillon is acutally some sort of Bong-A-Tron     >Question: does anyone know what type organ, if any, is found at the >former President's church?   This same friend said the following about the President's Church: " I can guarantee you there is no pipe organ at Maranatha in Plains. It's more than likely to have an old conn or baldwin, if anything at all. "   He also added the following: "Tell your friend that I am very familiar with Mom's Kitchen and Granny's Kitchen is here in Americus...LOL, along with Gladys' and the Rib Rack. (Gladys' is the best). Anyway. Yes, Plains is the town that time = forgot, I go there a couple times a week with my job. But I WILL check on the = organ at the church in Plains and get back to you :-)"   Hope this helps   David  
(back) Subject: 2' Quintaton From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 17:18:43 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0032_01C28101.903C0C40 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   I discovered a 2' Quintaton in the Gallery Pedal division of a1940ish =3D E.M.Skinner (built after his retirement) in the 1st Presbyterian Church, = =3D Glens Falls, NY. This a 5 manual 132 rank behemoth buried somewhere in = =3D the chancel. It has since been dispursed and replaced. Anyone have any = =3D idea why this stop ended up in this division.... was this to add clarity = =3D to the pedal divisivion? Just kidding, the word Quintaton perked my ears = =3D up.   Sand Lawn ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Cremona502@cs.com=3D20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 Sent: Thursday, October 31, 2002 1:58 PM Subject: Re: Quintaton     In a message dated 10/31/02 12:18:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, =3D bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk writes:=3D20       Specifications I have seen seem to favour it's use on manuals and =3D pedal at=3D20 16 ft, less frequently at 8 ft., never(?) at a higher pitch.=3D20       ------=3D_NextPart_000_0032_01C28101.903C0C40 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I discovered a 2' Quintaton in the = =3D Gallery Pedal=3D20 division of a1940ish E.M.Skinner (built after his retirement) in the 1st = =3D   Presbyterian Church, Glens Falls, NY.&nbsp; This a 5 manual 132 rank =3D behemoth=3D20 buried somewhere in the chancel.&nbsp; It has since been dispursed = and=3D20 replaced.&nbsp; Anyone have any idea why this stop ended up in this =3D division....=3D20 was this to add clarity to the pedal divisivion? Just kidding, the = word=3D20 Quintaton perked my ears up.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Sand Lawn</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: = =3D 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A href=3D3D"mailto:Cremona502@cs.com"=3D20 title=3D3DCremona502@cs.com>Cremona502@cs.com</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org"=3D20 title=3D3Dpipechat@pipechat.org>pipechat@pipechat.org</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Thursday, October 31, =3D 2002 1:58=3D20 PM</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: Quintaton</DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D3D2>In a =3D message dated=3D20 10/31/02 12:18:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk">bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk</A> = =3D writes:=3D20 <BR><BR><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"=3D20 TYPE=3D3D"CITE">Specifications I have seen seem to favour it's use on = =3D manuals=3D20 and pedal at <BR>16 ft, less frequently at 8 ft., never(?) at a =3D higher=3D20 pitch. </FONT><FONT color=3D3D#000000 face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 = size=3D3D3=3D20 =3D FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR></FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY><= =3D /HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0032_01C28101.903C0C40--    
(back) Subject: Re: Two mysteries for Halloween From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 17:47:37 -0600   Glenda   Just a follow-up - if you go to the Callaway Web Page at: http://www.callawaygardens.com/ and scroll your mouse over the time line you will find a photo of the organ console. It is in the 1960's section of the timeline.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Quintaton From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 19:36:55 EST     --part1_127.19a12acd.2af326a7_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 10/31/02 4:05:41 PM Eastern Standard Time, TheShieling@xtra.co.nz writes:     > So, there were, in NZ at least, Quintatons being made before the Baroque > revival.   Sorry, I should have been more specific. Quintatons did not usually = appear at 16 in the USA until the baroque revival. Of course they appeared on baroque organs or they would not have been able to be revived!! ;-)   Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_127.19a12acd.2af326a7_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 10/31/02 4:05:41 PM Eastern Standard Time, TheShieling@xtra.co.nz writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">So, there were, in = NZ at least, Quintatons being made before the Baroque <BR>revival.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Sorry, I should have been more specific. &nbsp;&nbsp;Quintatons did = not usually appear at 16 in the USA until the baroque revival. &nbsp;Of = course they appeared on baroque organs or they would not have been able to = be revived!! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_127.19a12acd.2af326a7_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Quintaton From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 19:45:36 EST     --part1_117.1a0b8fcb.2af328b0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 10/31/02 5:52:19 PM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:     > Metal Quintadenas at 4' pitch were a favorite of consultant and theorist =   > James B. Jamison, as he felt that the strong 1-1/3' component heard in > their > sound, when used with mezzo-forte fluework, produced a pseudo > "Kleinemixtur" > effect.   Very frequently, I find that stops or combinations which are supposed to produce a "pseudo" result are unsuccessful. The list includes the above =   mentioned pseudo "Kleinemixtur", string + flute =3D diapason, quintaton = =3D 8 + 2-2/3, and the ever popular Fauxboe (salicional + 2-2/3). Some of the = few successes are pedal resultants and cornet mixtures.   My feeling about Quintatons is that they must be designed strictly as a Quintaton and not to do double-duty, and certainly, they are as useful at = 16 as a Rohrschalmei is at 4! ;-)   I really enjoy the 1975 Casavant Quintaton 16, but only as an 8' manual = stop. As a 16 stop it's useful only as a 16 resultant with the Subbass 16. = As a solo stop it has a velvety and haunting sound with a nice "edge" and works =   very will with the flute stops (Quintaton 8 and Bourdon 4, Quintaton 8 and =   Spitzflute 2, or Quintaton 8 and Flachflote 1) played up an octave.   Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 ....an opportunity for health & wealth http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053   --part1_117.1a0b8fcb.2af328b0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 10/31/02 5:52:19 PM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Metal Quintadenas = at 4' pitch were a favorite of consultant and theorist <BR>James B. Jamison, as he felt that the strong 1-1/3' component heard in = their <BR>sound, when used with mezzo-forte fluework, produced a pseudo = "Kleinemixtur" <BR>effect. </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Very frequently, I find that stops or combinations which are supposed = to produce a "pseudo" result are unsuccessful. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The list = includes the above mentioned pseudo "Kleinemixtur", string + flute =3D = diapason, quintaton =3D 8 + 2-2/3, and the ever popular Fauxboe = (salicional + 2-2/3). &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Some of the few successes are = pedal resultants and cornet mixtures. <BR> <BR>My feeling about Quintatons is that they must be designed strictly as = a Quintaton and not to do double-duty, and certainly, they are as useful = at 16 as a Rohrschalmei is at 4! &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>I really enjoy the 1975 Casavant Quintaton 16, but only as an 8' = manual stop. &nbsp;&nbsp;As a 16 stop it's useful only as a 16 resultant = with the Subbass 16. &nbsp;&nbsp;As a solo stop it has a velvety and = haunting sound with a nice "edge" and works very will with the flute stops = (Quintaton 8 and Bourdon 4, Quintaton 8 and Spitzflute 2, or Quintaton 8 = and Flachflote 1) played up an octave. <BR> <BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres = http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health &amp; wealth = &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT></HTML>   --part1_117.1a0b8fcb.2af328b0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Quintaton From: <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 19:20:15 -0600   At 07:45 PM 10/31/2002 -0500, Bruce writes: <snip> the ever popular Fauxboe (salicional + 2-2/3) <snip>   <ROTFL>   Thanks, Bruce -- I'd somehow not heard that one before!   Happy Halloween, all!   Tim    
(back) Subject: Re: Quintaton From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 20:08:40 -0600   A Quintadena/Quintaten is a capped flute that is blown hard enough for the third harmonic to be very prominent. To give some idea of the sound, when = I was at school (40 years ago now, alas) we used to take a loudish 8' flute and couple the Choir Nazard with the choirbox shut to produce the same general effect.   The G. Donald Harrison idea was that since the 16' Quintadena will have quite a bit of 5.1/3' quint in it, using a softish one will produce a 16' Resultant, and when used in the Great chorus will produce (as Bruce = Cornely says) "gravity without weight," i.e., without muddying things too much. = In my experience the result is almost always disgusting, resembling something akin to an efflux of bath water.   The best Quintadenas I have heard have been 8' and 4' manual flutes with only a hint of quint. There is a nice 4' Quintadena of this sort on the Great of the 1952 Austin at Lehigh University, and Roosevelt produced some rather charming 8' ones on the Swells of some of their instruments in the 1880's.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Ken Cowan in Kalamazoo From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 21:45:54 -0600   For those that might be interested, the Kalamzoo Gazette has a review of Ken's recital last Sunday on their web site. The URL is: http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/kzgazette/index.ssf?/xml/story.ssf/html_= standard.xsl?/base/features-0/1035910202163350.xml   David  
(back) Subject: ALL SOULS, ST. LOUIS, AUSTIN TX From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 22:55:54 EST     --part1_149.1af98f8.2af3554a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   St. Louis Catholic Church, Austin, Texas Saturday, 2 November, 2002 All Souls Day     8:00 AM Solemn Requiem Mass in Latin Latin Ordinaries and Propers sung by the Magnificat Choir (Setting taken from the Pius X Hymnal, c. 1956)   7:30 PM Solemn Vespers for All Souls Day VESPERS FOR ALL SOUL'S DAY Sung by the Parish Choir and Schola Cantorum   Organ Voluntary: A Solemn Melody, Walford Davies (played by SF) Silent Processional: Tolling of the Funeral Bell Introit: Souls of the Righteous, T. Tertius Noble Preces and Response (O Lord, come to my assistance=3DE2=3D80=3DA6) =3D20 Lucernarium: O Radiant Light (Phos Hilaron) Psalm XXVII: Anglican Chant, setting: B-flat by Ivor Algernon Atkins Magnificat: Setting: b minor by T. Tertius Noble The Lesson: from the Book of Wisdom =3D20 Homily Nunc Dimittis: Setting: b minor by T. Tertius Noble The Creed The Reading of the Necrology Anthem: And I Saw A New Heaven, Edgar Bainton =3D20 Evening Prayers and The Lord's Prayer Hymn: The Day Thou Gavest, Lord, Is Ended (St. Clement) Setting: Rutter The Blessing and Dismissal Organ Recessional: Rhosymedre, Ralph Vaughan Williams (played by CT)   Scott F. Foppiano, Organist-Choirmaster and Director of Music Christopher B. Teel, Assistant Organist-Choirmaster   --part1_149.1af98f8.2af3554a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">St. Louis Catholic Church, Austin, Texas<BR> Saturday, 2 November, 2002<BR> All Souls Day<BR> <BR> <BR> 8:00 AM<BR> Solemn Requiem Mass in Latin<BR> Latin Ordinaries and Propers sung by the Magnificat Choir<BR> (Setting taken from the Pius X Hymnal, c. 1956)<BR> <BR> 7:30 PM<BR> Solemn Vespers for All Souls Day<BR> VESPERS FOR ALL SOUL'S DAY<BR> Sung by the Parish Choir and Schola Cantorum<BR> <BR> Organ Voluntary:&nbsp; A Solemn Melody, Walford Davies (played by SF)<BR> Silent Processional:&nbsp; Tolling of the Funeral Bell<BR> Introit:&nbsp; Souls of the Righteous, T. Tertius Noble<BR> Preces and Response (O Lord, come to my assistance=3DE2=3D80=3DA6) <BR> Lucernarium: O Radiant Light (Phos Hilaron)<BR> Psalm XXVII:&nbsp; Anglican Chant, setting: B-flat by Ivor Algernon = Atkins<B=3D R> Magnificat:&nbsp; Setting:&nbsp; b minor by T. Tertius Noble<BR> The Lesson:&nbsp; from the Book of Wisdom <BR> Homily<BR> Nunc Dimittis:&nbsp; Setting:&nbsp; b minor by T. Tertius Noble<BR> The Creed<BR> The Reading of the Necrology<BR> Anthem: And I Saw A New Heaven, Edgar Bainton <BR> Evening Prayers and The Lord's Prayer<BR> Hymn:&nbsp; The Day Thou Gavest, Lord, Is Ended (St. Clement)&nbsp; = Setting:=3D Rutter<BR> The Blessing and Dismissal<BR> Organ Recessional:&nbsp; Rhosymedre, Ralph Vaughan Williams (played by = CT)<B=3D R> <BR> Scott F. Foppiano, Organist-Choirmaster and Director of Music<BR> Christopher B. Teel, Assistant Organist-Choirmaster</FONT></HTML>   --part1_149.1af98f8.2af3554a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Ken Cowan in Kalamazoo From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 23:03:16 -0500   A professional review by a proper journalist in a real newspaper. This is really a great step forward, although, perhaps, it has always been that = way around those parts. It is certainly not the case around here. Congratulations to N & S and to Ken, and I guess to Kalamazoo as well.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, October 31, 2002 10:45 PM Subject: Ken Cowan in Kalamazoo     > For those that might be interested, the Kalamzoo Gazette has a review > of Ken's recital last Sunday on their web site. The URL is: > http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/kzgazette/index.ssf?/xml/story.ssf/html_= s tandard.xsl?/base/features-0/1035910202163350.xml > > David >      
(back) Subject: Excitement in Kalamazoo with Ken Cowan (a wee bit long) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 01 Nov 2002 00:10:45 -0500   Please forgive me if you find this redundant. I just thought you might like to get another perspective about this concert which I enjoyed so very much.   A bit more than one year ago, I had the pleasure to visit the Nichols & Simpson Organ Co. shop in Little Rock Arkansas. I saw, touched, examined, and even worked on pipe organ parts for the first time in my life. The shop crew and owners were kind and patient, answering my flurry of questions, and shared with me their passion for the instrument. I was deeply infected   by the experience and have pretty much abandoned all other pastimes at this point. Joe Nichols told me I have "The Sickness" (grin). In any event, I mention this because I saw the plans for a new organ during my visit, that would be installed in St. Augustine Cathedral, Kalamazoo Michigan during the Summer the following year. That process is now complete, and last Sunday, October 27, the organ was dedicated in a concert performed by the young wizard, Ken Cowan. I happily drove 5 hours from Cleveland to be there. The combination of hearing and seeing the new instrument whose progress I had followed   since the hatching stage, the chance to experience Ken Cowan in live performance, and the opportunity to greet   old friends from Little Rock, made this a rather glorious celebration for me. I'm sure everyone who attended felt much the same. The organ resides in twin cases up in the gallery loft at the rear of the Cathedral along with the console and seating for a choir. It is visually stunning with its bronze gold facade pipes and gorgeous   oak case work. The cases are situated either side of a large stained glass window, and with the light streaming in during the day, it is a visual treat, but difficult to photograph. I got some great digital pictures, but you have to fool with the brightness in the photo editing software to see the cases in detail. The Cathedral is moderately sized with a beautiful timber frame vaulted ceiling that suggests a promising acoustic, but the carpet covered main floor detracts from that possibility. There are reports that the carpeting may be soon removed, and with the addition of   the 17 more ranks that are currently just prepared for,   this instrument in this room should be awesome. Right now the organ has 41 ranks playing, and it is quite good as it is. With Ken's expert knowledge of registration, the organ spoke in wonderful ensemble, or   with distinct solo voices, whichever he chose. I know that Joe and Wayne take great pains to tonally finish their instruments to attain well balanced chorus groups   where every voice is heard, yet nothing sticks out. As I read the program that Ken had chosen, I realized this would not be a "war horse" filled "blow the doors off the place" concert, but instead, a blend of soft and loud, serious and cute, traditional and not   so traditional, and music of many different styles. We even heard some transcribed opera. Permit me to list the complete program, and follow with some comments on the pieces. --------------------------------------------------------------------   J. S. Bach Passacaglia in c minor, BVW 582   Seth Bingham Roulade   Louis Vierne From "Pieces de Fantasie" Claire de Lune Toccata   Charles Marie Widor Symphonie V Allegro Vivace   (Intermission)   Carl Maria von Weber Overture to Oberon   Gabriel Faure Nocturne from Shylock   Max Reger Fantasy on Wachet Auf ruft unx Stimme   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------= ---   The Passacaglia was an excellent send off choice I think. It is familiar enough to allow the listener to concentrate on hearing the organ and getting used to the touch and style of the performer. Ken's performance   of this piece is very different from those I had heard before, and it left me wanting to hear him do it several times again. We all quickly learned this isn't any wimpy chamber organ. When Ken finished the piece, he addressed the audience with some comments about Bach   and how much he loved that piece. That certainly came through in his performance. Then came some cute. The Roulade is a delightful lighthearted romp, and it gave us the chance to hear some of the upper register solo voices. The piece is full of little surprises that keeps you grinning a lot, and chuckling often. It sure relieved the tension after the Passacaglia. Vierne's Claire de Lune soothed and lulled us in preparation for the storm of the Toccata. Ken convinced   me that I need to listen to more Vierne than just the Finale of Symphonie V. I researched a little when I got   home, and discovered there is even more than one "Pieces de Fantasie". Vierne wrote a lot of music I discovered. The Widor piece gave us a rousing send off to intermission. I'm sure Ken needed the break to recover form all the flying of fingers and feet that was required. After Intermission, we got our taste of opera on the organ. Through the Overture to Oberon, Ken paints musical scenery, characters, and action without words or images. The music makes you imagine, and it almost seems real. Ken preceded this performance with comments   about the story, so you found yourself listening for clues to the entrance of characters and what they were doing. I'm sure it takes a lot of skill to pull off this transcription, and Ken was certainly up to the task. I loved this piece. The Nocturn from Shylock was another of those calming interludes that we all needed. It gave us a chance to fasten our seat belts for the Reger. Ken spoke at some length before the Reger Fantasy. I didn't take any notes, but I remember he said that Reger was a bit of a rebel and enjoyed composing in a way that often defied the traditions of the day. According to Ken, one story tells of Reger responding to a less than complimentary music critic. In the letter, Reger writes: "I have entered the smallest room in my house, and I have before me the newspaper containing your review of the performance of my music, and it is soon to be behind me". If we hadn't realized   it by then, we now knew that Ken Cowan has a delightful   sense of humor to go along with his wizardry at the organ. Michael Barone was the first to introduce me to Reger's music many years ago on Pipedreams, and I remember vividly saying "WOW" after hearing my first piece. I must admit my reaction to Ken's performance of   the Fantasy was slightly more animated and vocal. I like to think I was the first to my feet as I cheered wildly in genuine glee. There could have been no more fitting end to this wonderful musical experience, and I   didn't care who saw or heard as I expressed my appreciation to Ken. At some point I looked around to discover everyone was on their feet, and Ken retreated and returned 3 times before sitting back down to the console. As we collectively quieted in anticipation, Ken got back up and announced he would play "Danse Macabre" by Camille Saint-Saens. For me, the one big and only disappointment about this concert was having to turn my back and my ears to the organ because of the position of the seating. Ears are simply not designed to work as well in that position. Therefore, with Ken's encore about to start (I just love the "Danse"), I shed my composure, found a   vacant seat on the center isle, and moved to it. I turned backwards in the chair, and listened to the organ with my ears capturing every nuance as God intended. What heard was the strangest rendition of the "Danse" I had ever listened to. Ken follows the melody line faithfully, but the accompaniment was chock   full of improvisational liberty. The pedal trills were the most astounding. I never knew such sounds could come from a pipe organ. There can be no finer Halloween   anthem than Ken Cowan playing "Danse Macabre". It was a   most fitting end to a wonderful performance. Thanks Ken. Thanks also to Nichols & Simpson for creating this   wonderful Instrument, and to St. Augustine Cathedral for having the good taste to hire them.   Cheers Mike Gettelman        
(back) Subject: Chop goes the Copy/Paste From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 01 Nov 2002 00:23:52 -0500   Sorry for the choppy format of my Kalamazoo post. I copy and pasted in the main body of the report, and it didn't look like that when I sent it. The Internet goblins must have been at work on this Halloween night.   Mike