PipeChat Digest #3118 - Tuesday, September 10, 2002
 
Re: Peeters
  by "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net>
Hymn Tune Index
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Alternate tune name resource?
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Veering off topic - was: Alternate tune name resource?
  by "Harry Martenas" <hmartena@columbiapa.org>
Felix Hell - Catonsville, MD Sunday 9/8/02
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Felix Hell - Catonsville, MD Sunday 9/8/02
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
New Member's Saga of getting an organ.
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Peeters From: "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net> Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2002 07:41:32 -0400   I've played Peeters "Concerto for Piano and Organ" several times. It's great fine!! ----- Original Message ----- From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2002 2:29 AM Subject: Peeters     > Hello, > > Paul Emmons mentioned music by Peeters with which he was unfamiliar. > > A piece I often include in recitals is the lovely "Lied to the flowers" and, if I care to practise it, the "Lied to the Sun". Both are quite excellent.......I recommend them. > > AND.....who knows his fine Concerto for Piano and Organ? > > Regards, > > > Colin Mitchell > UK > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Hymn Tune Index From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2002 10:37:27 -0400   Justin Karch wrote: "I am looking for an index or resource that has names = of hymn tunes . . ."   D. DeWitt Wasson has compiled an index of 33,907 hymntunes that provides = the cross-references to names of tunes as well as many more resources. It is published in three volumes and is fully described at http://store.yahoo.com/ohscatalog/hyminandrelh.html   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: Alternate tune name resource? From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2002 15:30:12 -0500   On 9/9/02 2:38 PM, Emmons, Paul wrote:   > Now, with respect to the tunes, there is no need, because DeWitt > Wasson has done so quite encyclopedically in his new three-volume work, > "Hymntune Index and Related Hymn Materials." It's pricey, but music > libraries, at least, should have it. > > Both Diehl and Wasson are published by Scarecrow Press.     Now also available on CD-ROM from Scarecrow Press for computer junkies. = But $350 US!?   Cheers, Russ    
(back) Subject: Veering off topic - was: Alternate tune name resource? From: "Harry Martenas" <hmartena@columbiapa.org> Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2002 16:46:08 -0400   > > Both Diehl and Wasson are published by Scarecrow Press. > > > Now also available on CD-ROM from Scarecrow Press for > computer junkies. But $350 US!?   Charging $350 makes some amount of sense for 3 books comprising 2,600 pages. This is a niche product, and setting up the presses for a small run of three different books is not cheap. (It's not $350, either, but both the author and the publisher deserve to make a profit.)   That said, the production costs for the CD version have to be several orders of magnitude less than for the books.   So why isn't the price lower? I don't condone piracy/copyright infringement - but it's almost understandable.   /Harry-in-PA      
(back) Subject: Felix Hell - Catonsville, MD Sunday 9/8/02 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2002 20:03:33 -0400   Felix Hell - Our Lady of the Angels, Catonsville, MD - Sunday, September 8th, 3 p.m.   Dear Lists and Friends,   I like playing in church, enough that now, since moving a year or so ago, = I make an hour drive each way on Sundays, and don't mind it at all. It takes something special to get me to take a Sunday off, in fact, and this past Sunday, it was a concert by Felix Hell in Catonsville, MD (suburban Baltimore). It began at 3 p.m., and there was no way I could have made it after church. Long ago, my friend Gordon Johnson, Organist, Pianist, Composer, and Architect Extraordinaire (designer of our church), agreed to fill in for me. "If you would seek his monument, look" . . . at   < http://home.earthlink.net/~trinity06903 >. There is a slide show and = also a panorama!   As is my wont, I arrived at Our Lady of the Angels with about three = minutes to spare. But, the trick at a Felix Hell concert is to make sure you have someone saving you a seat! Friends Harry Martenas and Tommy-Lee Whitlock were down in the front row, waving to us, as we, with as much dignity as possible, made our way down the center aisle of a well packed church. I lived in Baltimore for a number of years, and had been at concerts in this church before, but I still cannot help but gape like a tourist at the = place. Go to the following URL and you will have a pretty good idea why!   < http://www.spearsvotta.com/photos/chapel3a.html >   This splendid 1912 building is now the chapel in the very large and beautiful Charlestown Retirement Community. I don't know if it also serves as a parish church for Catonsville residents. It is magnificent inside and out, and the interior has that wonderful kind of marble that looks for all the world like petrified Gorgonzola! On the Website, you can read about = the new lighting systems in this chapel. They really do show the features of = the building to good advantage. There is not much of a resonance measurable in seconds, but the sound of the organ is helped by a warmth and life in the acoustic. The nave floor is carpeted, providing good traction for the many very elderly people who live and worship here. The sanctuary area, = however, which I recall being also covered with carpet in years past, is now able = to reveal its wonderful marble floor. The chapel is home to a lovely Casavant Organ, which, let us say, certainly pre-dates the <Orgelbewegung!> I have not done my homework, and don't know the year. It is clearly an instrument of Romantic persuasion, on which Felix gave us for a beginning five = Baroque works of substance, three Bachs, one each of Luebeck and Pachelbel - AND, = he made it work really well, through careful use of the warm, clear and beautifully singing Flutes, Principals, and Reeds in this fine and honest instrument of another time. The Program:   Prelude in G Minor - Vincent Luebeck. Kudos to Felix for playing Luebeck's fascinating works. I think in the back of his mind has been a project to record the entire works. I'll drink to that! I heard him play a = wonderfully intricate Luebeck Choral Prelude a year or so ago at St. Peter's in Manhattan, and I recall thinking how very clear and exciting he made it. = It was the long setting of <Ich ruf zu dir>. Some will remember Arthur = Poister beginning many of his recitals with the Luebeck E Major Prelude and Fugue, that being the one Luebeck P&F that I play. It's good clean fun. I believe Felix plays this as well. Anyway, this Prelude in G Minor has really three fugues, rather distinct in mood, and Felix found apt registrations for = them, as well as for the sections of the Prelude which, like the E Major, makes = a great opening work for a recital.   The Toccata, Adagio and Fugue really likes Felix. It's a youthful work, = and so is he, one that will remain youthful throughout his life, one thinks. = The work is somewhat in the Italian spirit, with violin figures here and = there, and the Adagio is in the spirit of middle movements of the Italian string concerti. Felix does the Pedal solos in the Toccata exquisitely. They are often heard as four square and unmusical Pedal excercises. He made up a really evocative Cornet sound for the Adagio. The Fugue was, in Felix's manner, as fast as it can be played by a (supercharged) human, without sounding helter skelter. There are performers who will play it as fast as does Felix, and the comments will be all about "too fast." You won't hear this said about Felix. His tempi give maximum excitement and feel just right, a function of complete security. It was very hard not to clap, but = we had been asked to save all that for the end.   The Pachelbel Partita on <Was Gott tut das is wohlgetan> gave lots of = scope to explore sounds, with the variations in a variety of moods. It was = really glorious, and interesting throughout. The final choral statement in my = youth was the time to hit Full Organ, and bring it all to a crashing close. Actually, hearing it played very gently on a ravishing fluty Diapason = sound, as Felix did it, was the perfect close.   The Bach A Minor Prelude and Fugue is fairly new in Felix's repertoire. It is well seasoned, however, and like the C Major Toccata, albeit in a different mood, begins with a great monody, to which Felix responds with much sensitivity, without ever going overboard. The Prelude is such a rhapsodic fantasy, with fascinating alternating moods, all of which were fully realized. Felix is the perfect guy to trust with all this! The Fugue was possibly close to a tempo marking I found in my score, penciled in by Vernon deTar all those years ago - the dotted quarter equaling 52. I think he was trying to keep me humble. It gives the work a feeling of two to the bar, and it really does dance. I love the final flourish of the last six bars. All that wonderful drama was intact, ending perfectly a mature, virtuosic performance.   Bach - Trio in D Minor, a small gem, a single movement, written before the Six Sonatas. Hermann Keller points out a lovely similarity of the opening bars of the manual parts to the Fugue of the G Minor Fantasy and Fugue, albeit in another key. Played with wonderfully supple ornamentation throughout. Not a bad bridge to the Mendelssohn that followed:   Sonata No. 3, Opus 65. A wonderful Maestoso beginning, and a gentler Fugal section, with that powerful bit of <Aus tiefer Noth> sounding out firmly = in the Pedal. Then, take this anyway you want, all Hell breaks loose at this point - in Mendelssohn's words: "poco a poco piu animato e piu forte," eventually reaching 100=3D the quarter note. Well, there was lots of <piu animato> and a goodly dose of <piu forte> as well, until the big = ritardando and the glorious return to the music of the opening. For the beautiful <Andante tranquillo>, we were treated to an elegant gentle sound that = really sang and soared in a most beautiful way. I'm glad we were asked not to applaud. It would have been an intrusion on the mood that had just been = set. The two Felices really do understand and deserve each other.   I have heard Felix play the Guilmant First Sonata several times, and I do not tire of it at all. How I wish I could have heard it in its form as a concerto, when he played it in Ontario under Boris Brott. Some day. A few years ago, I wrote about someone else's performance of the Guilmant Eighth Sonata, and Agnes Armstrong, whose book on Guilmant we hope will be with = us e're long, commented that she thought that was the greatest of them. Interesting that while the First is the basis of the 1st Concerto, it is = the Eighth which is the basis of the 2nd Concerto, and I hope I am not asking too much in hoping to hear that one day also. Whom to ask? God plays the Guitar now. Not much help there. Anyway, the First Sonata is not hard on = the ears of even those unfamiliar with Organ or even "classical" music. It is tuneful and pleasant, and rises to moments of great excitement and great beauty. Felix obviously has his patterns of registering this piece worked out, but on every instrument, nonetheless, he takes much care to exploit = the best the Organ has to offer, no matter how inconvenient it might be to make it happen. It really pays off in the kind of performance we were given, = with the sections of the first movement beautifully set off one from the other, and the gorgeous Pastorale awash with fine and powerfully moving solo sounds. Given the choice of the Widor Toccata or the Final of this Sonata, = I really do believe I would choose the latter. It is an amazing <tour de force>, both for the player and for the composer, and it has those unforgettable "rumble strips" that appear in the Pedal here and there - = you know, the great rumble you hear when you drive too close to the edge on = many highways now, or that also increasingly appear in front of you as you approach a toll gate. Guilmant anticipated all of that. It is a unique effect. In the hands of Felix Hell, it all sounds unbelievably effortless. At the end of this piece, we had our first opportunity to applaud, and applaud we all did, on our feet, with some vocal enhancement! Felix came down from the balcony (I forgot to mention that the organ is placed high = in the west end gallery) to ever louder clapping and cheering. After a bit, = he was able to make a little speech, which included the information that it = was last September 9th that he played in this same church. Everyone who was there, most of whom were probably also there this year, had the same horrific collective experience two days later. He was to have played in Atlanta on the 11th, but, of course, it did not happen. If I recall correctly, he was already down there preparing, when the tragedy unfolded. If I heard him correctly, he was to have played the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor then, and wanted to play it for us today as an encore. There is a small "slave" console downstairs, and he elected to use that so people = could see him a bit. Apparently the upstairs console overrides this small = console, and there was a momentary bit of confusion about registration, but it all came out o.k. After that, Felix played the quiet last movement of the Mendelssohn Sixth Sonata, first asking that we not applaud, but rather = just quietly leave or remain at the end, as we preferred. Many chose to sit quietly for a bit, after the music finished, and others went to Felix to quietly offer thanks and congratulations for such a wonderful recital.   This coming Friday at 8 p.m., Felix will play at Methuen to benefit a scholarship program the Music Hall sponsors, providing funds for = graduating high school students who will be studying Organ at a university next year. You can find absolutely everything you need to know about this event, the program (click on "Special Events"), the price ($10), directions for = getting there, and information about and a stunning picture of this most amazing creation. < http://www.mmmh.org/home.htm > Come early if you can. The hall is quite tall, but not so wide and long, = and the seating is somewhat limited. I think it will be crowded.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com        
(back) Subject: Re: Felix Hell - Catonsville, MD Sunday 9/8/02 From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2002 21:24:18 EDT   In a message dated 9/10/02 8:06:51 PM Eastern Daylight Time, manderusa@earthlink.net writes:   << It takes something special to get me to take a Sunday off, in fact, and =   this past Sunday, it was a concert by Felix Hell in Catonsville, MD (suburban Baltimore). >>   WHY DIDN'T I KNOW ABOUT THIS???? The retirement home where this gorgeous chapel is located is about 1.5 miles from my house. I didn't see anything = in the local press about it.   << but I still cannot help but gape like a tourist at the place. Go to the following URL and you will have a pretty good idea why!   < http://www.spearsvotta.com/photos/chapel3a.html > >>   I was showing this "chapel" to a friend visiting from Ohio, and his words, =   after walking in and having his jaw drop to the ground were: "If this is = the chapel, I can't wait to see the main church!"   << This splendid 1912 building is now the chapel in the very large and beautiful Charlestown Retirement Community. I don't know if it also serves as a parish church for Catonsville residents. >>   The chapel is run by an order of brothers which hold masses there, but = there are also protestant services held there. Since most of the residents of Charlestown are mobile, many of them are members of churches in the community, or the churches where they were members before moving there.   Before this former RC seminary's incarnation as a retirement community, a very fundamentalist/pentacostal church was renting space in the buildings. = A friend was music director there, and I asked him whether they were using = the pipe organ. He said they didn't need to, as they already had a Hammond = B-3 (GAG!!!!!)  
(back) Subject: New Member's Saga of getting an organ. From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2002 22:59:27 EDT     --part1_46.2d6d66e6.2ab00b8f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear List,   I apologize up front for the length of this message. I won't make this a habit.   I was on Pipechat and Piporg-L about 4 years ago. I posted = numerous messages and questions, and, I think, I behaved myself for the most part. = I unsubscribed from the pipe organ groups so that I wouldn't keep torturing myself trying to get a pipe organ. I guess the desire to have a pipe = organ had become an idol to me. I sealed up my box of pipe organ paraphernalia = - including some excelent and educational advice from Rich Schneider, Chris Feiereisen, Bruce Cornely, Ken List, Larry Chance, and a few others - to = be reopened some day when my children were grown and I could begin my hobby.   I was tempted again last year when I discovered the www.keyboardtrader.com website. A few months ago there was a 10 rank = Austin Opus 1440 for sale in Gainesville, Florida. Knowing ol' Bruce lived = there, I asked him to go check it out. He encouraged me to pursue it. The = unanswered question was "how" to go about it.   I was attending a Pediatric Conference in Kiawah (next to = Charleston, SC). Our route would take us thru Columbia, SC where a beautiful 4 rank Wicks was for sale. Surprisingly, my wife suggested that we stop to see = it on our way. Unfortunately, it sold a week before our trip. I very sheepishly asked if we could leave Kiawah right after my last meeting and travel the 6 hours to Gainesville to see the Austin (would cost us $40 for =   hotel room instead of the $150 we would spend for the add'l night in = Kiawah). She agreed.   While in Charleston, I spent a very informative and interesting afternoon with Allan Ontko of Ontko and Young Pipe Organs. As it turns = out, he will be installing a new organ in a West Georgia Church which happens = to be attended by a friend of mine. His traveling route will take him within =   about 2 miles of my house. I've asked if he would allow me to come along when he installs it and provide some free labor in return for the advice = he's given me in my decision to purchase this organ.   I had never met Bruce Cornely, tho' we had built an good "e-friendship" thru our frequent online communications about organs. In return for some fine dining, he arranged an informative tour of some of Gainesville's organs. I got to play three trackers for the first time in = my life. I even came to appreciate the versatility of a single manual/pedal tracker with divided keyboard!   The Austin had been installed along two walls of the owner's garage =   since 1972. Since the owner's death a few years ago, the organ had been unplayed. Mud daubers had taken up residence in many of the pipes. The organ had numerous dead note and a few ciphers. My wife fell in love with =   the beautiful oak console.   Due to the amount of work I estimated that needed to be done, I = made an offer of 40% of the asking price, which was not immediately accepted. = A few weeks later, I received an e-mail accepting my offer.   Last Thursday afternoon, my Dad and I set out in a 24' U-Haul aimed =   for Gainesville to pick up a pipe organ. I had built 11 pipe crates and purchased labels and baggies in which to put labelled bolts and other = parts. Just after entering Florida (around 11 p.m.) my wife phones me to tell me that our 13 year old son broke his ankle playing football, but was OK.   After running a few errands in Gainesville Friday morning, we = finally started packing up pipes around 9:45. I had hoped to test each note and = put a different colored sticker by the toehole depending upon whether the ciphered or didn't work at all. After testing one rank with my dad having =   difficulty figuring out every other key (it was a diatonic !\/! - shaped = pipe layout) I decided "to heck with it". We just packed up the pipes. I = hadn't even tho't about eats and drinks. We were dripping with sweat. The seller gave us some ice and water. I was also trying to label each hose and = cable. Again, it got too complicated, so I just cut them. Eight ranks of the = organ are straight with only two ranks being unified, so I figured the rewiring will be pretty straightforward.   By around 4:30, we were hot, hungry, thirsty, soaking wet, = absolutely filthy, and fatigued. The 3 rank pitman chest, 3 unit chests, and pipes = were loaded. We had no other transportation, since we didn't want to move the truck. I sheepishly phoned Bruce and bribed him with dinner if he would = come pick us up, take us to our motel, and drive us to dinner - which he did.   In return for breakfast (hope I'm not making Bruce sound bad) he helped us Saturday morning. All that remained were the console, a movable =   platform, the 5 rank pitman chest, and the huge blower. We managed to get = it all loaded by about 10:15 a.m. and were on our way.   I managed to get a few friends from church to come over this = evening to help unload it all into the basement. Needless to say, I'm a little overwhelmed, wondering if I've bitten off more than I can chew. I'm = excited, though. For those of you who remember my postings, you can probably appreciate how excited I am to actually have a pipe organ after coveting = one for 35 years!?! I'm a little worn out as well. I didn't sleep well for 2 =   nights in anticipation of the trip. I didn't sleep well for the two = nights down there. Fortunately, I wasn't swamped at the office these past two = days.   I will certainly be posing some questions. I will try to be good = and search the archives before I ask the obvious. I was particularly = surprised by the thread about wiring up the blower; I tho't I'd just run a 220v = line from my main panel to the basement and hook it up. O well.   I'm posting a second message with the information specific to the organ.   Thanks for sharing my excitement.   Keith Zimmerman, M.D. Commerce, Georgia   --part1_46.2d6d66e6.2ab00b8f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear List,<BR> <BR> I apologize up front for the length of this message.&nbsp; I won't make = this a habit.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I was on Pipechat and Piporg-L about = 4 years ago.&nbsp; I posted numerous messages and questions, and, I think, = I behaved myself for the most part.&nbsp; I unsubscribed from the pipe = organ groups so that I wouldn't keep torturing myself trying to get a pipe = organ.&nbsp; I guess the desire to have a pipe organ had become an idol to = me.&nbsp; I sealed up my box of pipe organ paraphernalia - including some = excelent and educational advice from Rich Schneider, Chris Feiereisen, = Bruce Cornely, Ken List, Larry Chance, and a few others - to be reopened = some day when my children were grown and I could begin my hobby.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I was tempted again last year when I = discovered the www.keyboardtrader.com website.&nbsp; A few months ago = there was a 10 rank Austin Opus 1440 for sale in Gainesville, = Florida.&nbsp; Knowing ol' Bruce lived there, I asked him to go check it = out.&nbsp; He encouraged me to pursue it.&nbsp; The unanswered question = was "how" to go about it.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I was attending a Pediatric = Conference in Kiawah (next to Charleston, SC).&nbsp; Our route would take = us thru Columbia, SC where a beautiful 4 rank Wicks was for sale.&nbsp; = Surprisingly, my wife suggested that we stop to see it on our way.&nbsp; = Unfortunately, it sold a week before our trip.&nbsp; I very sheepishly = asked if we could leave Kiawah right after my last meeting and travel the = 6 hours to Gainesville to see the Austin (would cost us $40 for hotel room = instead of the $150 we would spend for the add'l night in Kiawah).&nbsp; = She agreed.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; While in Charleston, I spent a very informative and interesting afternoon with Allan = Ontko of Ontko and Young Pipe Organs.&nbsp; As it turns out, he will be = installing a new organ in a West Georgia Church which happens to be = attended by a friend of mine.&nbsp; His traveling route will take him = within about 2 miles of my house.&nbsp; I've asked if he would allow me to = come along when he installs it and provide some free labor in return for = the advice he's given me in my decision to purchase this organ.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I had never met Bruce Cornely, tho' = we had built an good "e-friendship" thru our frequent online = communications about organs.&nbsp; In return for some fine dining, he = arranged an informative tour of some of Gainesville's organs.&nbsp; I got = to play three trackers for the first time in my life.&nbsp; I even came to = appreciate the versatility of a single manual/pedal tracker with divided = keyboard!<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The Austin had been installed along = two walls of the owner's garage since 1972.&nbsp; Since the owner's death = a few years ago, the organ had been unplayed.&nbsp; Mud daubers had taken = up residence in many of the pipes.&nbsp; The organ had numerous dead note = and a few ciphers.&nbsp; My wife fell in love with the beautiful oak = console.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Due to the amount of work I estimated = that needed to be done, I made an offer of 40% of the asking price, which = was not immediately accepted.&nbsp; A few weeks later, I received an = e-mail accepting my offer.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Last Thursday afternoon, my Dad and I = set out in a 24' U-Haul aimed for Gainesville to pick up a pipe = organ.&nbsp; I had built 11 pipe crates and purchased labels and baggies = in which to put labelled bolts and other parts.&nbsp; Just after entering = Florida (around 11 p.m.) my wife phones me to tell me that our 13 year old = son broke his ankle playing football, but was OK.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; After running a few errands in = Gainesville Friday morning, we finally started packing up pipes around = 9:45.&nbsp; I had hoped to test each note and put a different colored = sticker by the toehole depending upon whether the ciphered or didn't work = at all.&nbsp; After testing one rank with my dad having difficulty = figuring out every other key (it was a diatonic !\/! - shaped pipe layout) = I decided "to heck with it".&nbsp; We just packed up the pipes.&nbsp; I = hadn't even tho't about eats and drinks.&nbsp; We were dripping with = sweat.&nbsp; The seller gave us some ice and water.&nbsp; I was also = trying to label each hose and cable. Again, it got too complicated, so I = just cut them.&nbsp; Eight ranks of the organ are straight with only two = ranks being unified, so I figured the rewiring will be pretty = straightforward.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; By around 4:30, we were hot, hungry, = thirsty, soaking wet, absolutely filthy, and fatigued.&nbsp; The 3 rank = pitman chest, 3 unit chests, and pipes were loaded.&nbsp; We had no other = transportation, since we didn't want to move the truck.&nbsp; I sheepishly = phoned Bruce and bribed him with dinner if he would come pick us up, take = us to our motel, and drive us to dinner - which he did.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In return for breakfast (hope I'm not = making Bruce sound bad) he helped us Saturday morning.&nbsp; All that = remained were the console, a movable platform, the 5 rank pitman chest, = and the huge blower.&nbsp; We managed to get it all loaded by about 10:15 = a.m. and were on our way.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I managed to get a few friends from = church to come over this evening to help unload it all into the = basement.&nbsp; Needless to say, I'm a little overwhelmed, wondering if = I've bitten off more than I can chew.&nbsp; I'm excited, though.&nbsp; For = those of you who remember my postings, you can probably appreciate how = excited I am to actually have a pipe organ after coveting one for 35 = years!?!&nbsp; I'm a little worn out as well.&nbsp; I didn't sleep well for 2 nights in = anticipation of the trip.&nbsp; I didn't sleep well for the two nights = down there.&nbsp; Fortunately, I wasn't swamped at the office these past = two days.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I will certainly be posing some = questions.&nbsp; I will try to be good and search the archives before I = ask the obvious.&nbsp; I was particularly surprised by the thread about = wiring up the blower;&nbsp; I tho't I'd just run a 220v line from my main = panel to the basement and hook it up.&nbsp; O well.<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I'm posting a second message with the = information specific to the organ.<BR> <BR> Thanks for sharing my excitement.<BR> <BR> Keith Zimmerman, M.D.<BR> Commerce, Georgia</FONT></HTML>   --part1_46.2d6d66e6.2ab00b8f_boundary--