PipeChat Digest #3126 - Sunday, September 15, 2002
 
Re: Protestant versus latin hymns
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Protestant versus latin hymns
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: Protestant versus latin hymns
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Switching.
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Small Organs
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Protestant versus latin hymns From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2002 09:42:08 -0400   On 9/13/02 10:22 PM, "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> = wrote:   > Gosh, last I knew, Nortons still > published Paul Henry Lang's treasure _Music in Western Civilization_, > 1950!!!   Now, THERE's a name from the past! But IS this the same as Paul H. D. = Lang, pastor in 1955 when I last visited him of an LCMS parish in Palo Alto?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Protestant versus latin hymns From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2002 09:51:06 EDT   In a message dated 9/14/02 9:43:03 AM Eastern Daylight Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   << Now, THERE's a name from the past! But IS this the same as Paul H. D. Lang, pastor in 1955 when I last visited him of an LCMS parish in Palo Alto? >>   Paul Lang's entry in the New Grove doesn't mention anything about being a minister or attending seminary. It does say that he a full professor of musicology at Columbia University from 1939 to 1969. (might've made = things hard to moonlight in California). From 1955 to 1958, he was also = president of the American Musicological Society.   I was also pleased to discover that in his early musical life, he was a bassoonist.  
(back) Subject: Re: Protestant versus latin hymns From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2002 09:55:46 -0400   On 9/14/02 9:51 AM, "ContraReed@aol.com" <ContraReed@aol.com> wrote:   > Paul Lang's entry in the New Grove doesn't mention anything about being = a > minister or attending seminary. It does say that he a full professor of > musicology at Columbia University from 1939 to 1969. (might've made = things > hard to moonlight in California). From 1955 to 1958, he was also = president > of the American Musicological Society. > I guess that rules him out. Otherwise I'd not have been surprised if they were the same man. Pastor Lang in Palo Alto was a scholarly type, pastor = of a parish that had jewel of a Spanish mission-style church, with a tiny little gallery in the west end for the organ and cantor. First place I = ever heard Introits and Graduals chanted from the gallery even on the most ordinary (no pun) of occasions.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Switching. From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2002 23:51:15 EDT     --part1_185.e667e81.2ab55db3_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Experts,   I would like to read a treatise on the wiring of organs - from the keys to =   the pipes - naming the various components that are used. I've seen relays =   and gang switches. I looked into a Moller Artiste years ago and it was = wired using the small sliding things with the little "quill" looking things sticking up that I've seen in an old Reisner catalog called "couplers".   1. For straight organs first. I guess that would keep things simple. A. Pitman chests B. EP chests C. DE chests 2 For unified organs. A little more complicated. Where I tend to see things like gang switches and relays. IOW, please explain the big panel = that can be as big as a ping pong table that directs the current from the keys = to the right pipe(s).   Probably, discussing it using the older mechanical components first would help the understanding. After we understand that, we'll be in better position to understand the solid state way of doing it.   Thanks, Keith   --part1_185.e667e81.2ab55db3_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Experts,<BR> <BR> I would like to read a treatise on the wiring of organs - from the keys to = the pipes - naming the various components that are used.&nbsp; I've seen = relays and gang switches.&nbsp; I looked into a Moller Artiste years ago = and it was wired using the small sliding things with the little "quill" = looking things sticking up that I've seen in an old Reisner catalog called = "couplers".<BR> <BR> 1.&nbsp; For straight organs first.&nbsp; I guess that would keep things = simple.<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A.&nbsp; Pitman chests<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; B.&nbsp; EP chests<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; C.&nbsp; DE chests<BR> 2&nbsp; For unified organs.&nbsp; A little more complicated.&nbsp; Where I = tend to see things like gang switches and relays.&nbsp; IOW, please = explain the big panel that can be as big as a ping pong table that directs = the current from the keys to the right pipe(s).<BR> <BR> Probably, discussing it using the older mechanical components first would = help the understanding.&nbsp; After we understand that, we'll be in better = position to understand the solid state way of doing it.<BR> <BR> Thanks,<BR> Keith</FONT></HTML>   --part1_185.e667e81.2ab55db3_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Small Organs From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sun, 15 Sep 2002 00:40:42 EDT     --part1_102.1ae968e3.2ab5694a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Before I got this organ, I had finally come to the conclusion that I would =   never be able to get the kind of pipe organ I wanted because (1) I wanted = too much organ and (2) I wanted it voiced exactly right which would require a considerable amount of professional help which I didn't think I would be = able to afford. Several times, I almost resigned myself to the idea that I = would only be able to get what would satisfy me in the form of a Rodgers or = Allen.   Regarding the afford part, I admire those people who can put $50-60K into = a custom built chamber organ for their home. I would love to do that.   I truly don't mean to offend anybody, but I really don't want an organ = that is highly unified. When I have a full setting and play a broken chord = such as C-E-G-C, that's what I want, not C-E-G-nothing (because the pipes are already speaking for that key).   Anyway, I had to realize that, if I "had" to have a pipe organ and it had = to be done on a shoestring budget, I wouldn't be able to have everything I wanted. I would have to trim my organ down to some essentials. Any pipe organ I get would not be able to do justice to all organ works, but, being = an amateur organist, I don't think I'll be playing works by Messien, Reger, Langlais, et al. For much of what I enjoy playing, I think I'd do fine on = a much smaller instrument. For the occasional larger work, my organ would = be a great "practice" organ for getting the notes right. Additionally, I want others to enjoy my organ music, not endure it (even from down the street).   I remember a discussion about the "perfect practice organ" on piporg = several years ago. A valid question was raised about what was really meant by the =   term "practice organ". I think most of us, me included, are trying to fit =   concert organs into our homes. If we can't do it with enough pipes, we = unify to the hilt, squeezing out 8-4-2 2/3-2-1 1/3-1 from a single rank of = pipes, and I wonder how many of us are truly pleased with our result. Please, I'm =   not trying to be judgemental.   I searched the web for things about small pipe organs. I was surprised to =   find a few documents that really helped me set some priorities.   These first two documents helped answer some questions about the = differences in purpose, tonal structure, and voicing of small organs (or organs built = for small spaces) as compared with larger ones. Apparently, one creates contrasting registrations by using various "single stop" settings.   <A = HREF=3D"http://www.users.bigpond.com/wjsimonpierce/ethos/smallorgans1.htm">= Small Organs: A Perspective - Part 1</A> http://www.users.bigpond.com/wjsimonpierce/ethos/smallorgans1.htm   <A = HREF=3D"http://www.users.bigpond.com/wjsimonpierce/ethos/smallorgans2.htm">= Small Organs: A Perspective - Part 2</A> http://www.users.bigpond.com/wjsimonpierce/ethos/smallorgans2.htm   <A HREF=3D"http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/dixon/small.htm">George = Dixon - The Tonal Structure of the Small Organ</A> http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/dixon/small.htm     This fourth document got me really excited. Bruce will tell you that he = and I volleyed back and forth numerous times working out stoplists for small 2 =   and 3 manual organs of around 8 ranks (mostly straight!). Apparently, = each stop on these organs is carefully chosen and voiced such that each = individual stop can stand alone in order to create several contrasting settings, yet they can blend into a full enough chorus to create some pretense of a full =   plenum.   <A HREF=3D"http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/trz/3m.htm">Small 3 = Manual British Organs of the Romantic Zenith</A> http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/trz/3m.htm   This document was fantastic!   I think all of the organs described in this document are tracker action, = so they are, by necessity, straight organs. For the home organ of the = 2000's, I don't see why these designs can't be adapted to electrification. Much of the success of these organs surely lies in their voicing and balancing.   The first organ described is a 3m/p 4 rank, 4 stop organ!?!?!? Quite interesting and versatile.   My favorite is a 3M/6R+P organ originally in the residence of a W. H. = Monk, London. There is a detailed account of this organ at:   <A HREF=3D"http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/essays/kilk.htm">Father Willis = Organ at Kilkhampton</A> http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/essays/kilk.htm   Another favorite was a 10 stop 3 manual organ at The Chapel, Weymouth College, Dorset.   I guess my rambling above was just to show y'all some of the tho't process = I was going thru to try to get an organ that I would be happy with overall. = I guess I surprised myself by learning that one could have a very versatile home organ with only 6 ranks of pipes, and be able to play most baroque = and classical organ music on it quite satisfactorily (is that a word?). At least, this would provide an initial nucleus that would be quite playable from the get go, but could, of course, be added to as money and space allowed.   I hope you enjoy the articles.   Sincerely, Keith   --part1_102.1ae968e3.2ab5694a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Before I got this organ, I had finally come to = the conclusion that I would never be able to get the kind of pipe organ I = wanted because (1) I wanted too much organ and (2) I wanted it voiced = exactly right which would require a considerable amount of professional = help which I didn't think I would be able to afford.&nbsp; Several times, = I almost resigned myself to the idea that I would only be able to get what = would satisfy me in the form of a Rodgers or Allen.<BR> <BR> Regarding the afford part, I admire those people who can put $50-60K into = a custom built chamber organ for their home.&nbsp; I would love to do = that.<BR> <BR> I truly don't mean to offend anybody, but I really don't want an organ = that is highly unified.&nbsp; When I have a full setting and play a broken = chord such as C-E-G-C, that's what I want, not C-E-G-nothing (because the = pipes are already speaking for that key).<BR> <BR> Anyway, I had to realize that, if I "had" to have a pipe organ and it had = to be done on a shoestring budget, I wouldn't be able to have everything I = wanted.&nbsp; I would have to trim my organ down to some essentials.&nbsp; = Any pipe organ I get would not be able to do justice to all organ works, = but, being an amateur organist, I don't think I'll be playing works by = Messien, Reger, Langlais, et al. For much of what I enjoy playing, I think = I'd do fine on a much smaller instrument.&nbsp; For the occasional larger = work, my organ would be a great "practice" organ for getting the notes = right.&nbsp; Additionally, I want others to enjoy my organ music, not = endure it (even from down the street).<BR> <BR> I remember a discussion about the "perfect practice organ" on piporg = several years ago.&nbsp; A valid question was raised about what was really = meant by the term "practice organ".&nbsp; I think most of us, me included, = are trying to fit concert organs into our homes.&nbsp; If we can't do it = with enough pipes, we unify to the hilt, squeezing out 8-4-2 2/3-2-1 1/3-1 = from a single rank of pipes, and I wonder how many of us are truly pleased = with our result. Please, I'm not trying to be judgemental.<BR> <BR> I searched the web for things about small pipe organs.&nbsp; I was = surprised to find a few documents that really helped me set some = priorities.<BR> <BR> These first two documents helped answer some questions about the = differences in purpose, tonal structure, and voicing of small organs (or = organs built for small spaces) as compared with larger ones.&nbsp; = Apparently, one creates contrasting registrations by using various "single = stop" settings.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> <A = HREF=3D"http://www.users.bigpond.com/wjsimonpierce/ethos/smallorgans1.htm">= Small Organs: A Perspective - Part 1</A><BR> http://www.users.bigpond.com/wjsimonpierce/ethos/smallorgans1.htm<BR> <BR> <A = HREF=3D"http://www.users.bigpond.com/wjsimonpierce/ethos/smallorgans2.htm">= Small Organs: A Perspective - Part 2</A><BR> http://www.users.bigpond.com/wjsimonpierce/ethos/smallorgans2.htm<BR> <BR> <A HREF=3D"http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/dixon/small.htm">George = Dixon - The Tonal Structure of the Small Organ</A><BR> http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/dixon/small.htm<BR> <BR> <BR> This fourth document got me really excited.&nbsp; Bruce will tell you that = he and I volleyed back and forth numerous times working out stoplists for = small 2 and 3 manual organs of around 8 ranks (mostly straight!).&nbsp; = Apparently, each stop on these organs is carefully chosen and voiced such = that each individual stop can stand alone in order to create several = contrasting settings, yet they can blend into a full enough chorus to = create some pretense of a full plenum.<BR> <BR> <A HREF=3D"http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/trz/3m.htm">Small 3 = Manual British Organs of the Romantic Zenith</A><BR> http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/trz/3m.htm<BR> <BR> This document was fantastic!<BR> <BR> I think all of the organs described in this document are tracker action, = so they are, by necessity, straight organs.&nbsp; For the home organ of = the 2000's, I don't see why these designs can't be adapted to = electrification.&nbsp; Much of the success of these organs surely lies in = their voicing and balancing.<BR> <BR> The first organ described is a 3m/p 4 rank, 4 stop organ!?!?!?&nbsp; Quite = interesting and versatile.<BR> <BR> My favorite is a 3M/6R+P organ originally in the residence of a W. H. = Monk, London.&nbsp; There is a detailed account of this organ at:<BR> <BR> <A HREF=3D"http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/essays/kilk.htm">Father Willis = Organ at Kilkhampton</A><BR> http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/essays/kilk.htm<BR> <BR> Another favorite was a 10 stop 3 manual organ at The Chapel, Weymouth = College, Dorset.<BR> <BR> I guess my rambling above was just to show y'all some of the tho't process = I was going thru to try to get an organ that I would be happy with = overall.&nbsp; I guess I surprised myself by learning that one could have = a very versatile home organ with only 6 ranks of pipes, and be able to = play most baroque and classical organ music on it quite satisfactorily (is = that a word?).&nbsp;&nbsp; At least, this would provide an initial nucleus = that would be quite playable from the get go, but could, of course, be = added to as money and space allowed.<BR> <BR> I hope you enjoy the articles.<BR> <BR> Sincerely,<BR> Keith </FONT></HTML>   --part1_102.1ae968e3.2ab5694a_boundary--