PipeChat Digest #3595 - Monday, April 7, 2003
 
Re: Ireland Question--choir expedition--
  by "Philip Thibault" <pthibaul@maine.rr.com>
Mander Organ Anniversary in NYC
  by "Hoffman, Christine" <hoffmanc@SAINTIGNATIUSLOYOLA.ORG>
Re: Trinity's "Organ" Dedication NYC
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: EUROPE and USA : Organ Builders of quality
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: EUROPE and USA : Organ Builders of quality
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
RE: New Fire Regulations in Boston
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Vincent Dubois in Cleveland
  by "Jim Clouser" <CromorneCipher@hotmail.com>
RE: Episcopal churches in Arizona/Utah
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: EUROPE and USA : Organ Builders of quality
  by "andrew meagher" <ameagher@stny.rr.com>
RE: how often the organs get PLAYED
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: how often the organs get PLAYED
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: The Mormons, Organ-Building, and Music ( a little long)
  by "David Carter" <davidorganist2002@yahoo.com>
Re: Looking for Handel
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: EUROPE and USA : Organ Builders of quality
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Ireland Question--choir expedition-- From: "Philip Thibault" <pthibaul@maine.rr.com> Date: Mon, 07 Apr 2003 06:57:51 -0400     > Next year, don't plan for summertime. Europe is closed. > > I've been on both ends of this, many times. YEARS ago I was in a = variety of > touring choirs; no sweat. You have a "business manager" (not a = musician) > who set things up.   But why go to Ireland to > see a movie? This was simply a big mistake. Get out of it. > > Alan >   Thanks for your kind response--yeah it's not gonna be as promised--however our choir is psyched (or is it that I am psycho?) Their last trip was to Austria in December a couple of years ago--they simply love being together--so that's enuff fer them.   Our's is a pretty affluent RC church with (wow!) a choir which actually sings SATB of medium difficulty. (last Sunday 44 member choir sang the King's singers rendering (sic) of Simple Gifts). We have a great space (visiting choirs rank it as one of the best) a cute little 1894 16 rank Jardine and a new 6'4 Boston piano.   They are mostly professionals in the community--ernest and (god forbid) sincere. So--easy prey--The upside, is that they are so enthusiastic that they aren't nearly as easily upset as is their accompanyist!   We have about 80 on this trip--I didn't mention that the tour company = could only offer 2 comps--I usually find the industry standard is about one to = ten paying.   So--it's too late to back out now--Thanks for your input--They'll be happy singing in an empty room--Know of any subway stations with great = acoustics?   Thanks again Phil  
(back) Subject: Mander Organ Anniversary in NYC From: "Hoffman, Christine" <hoffmanc@SAINTIGNATIUSLOYOLA.ORG> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 09:57:00 -0400   SACRED MUSIC IN A SACRED SPACE PRESENTS =20   The 10th Anniversary Recital of the N.P. Mander Organ   Sunday, April 27, 2003 at 4:00 PM Church of St. Ignatius Loyola =B7 980 Park Avenue at 84th Street   Kent Tritle, Nancianne Parrella, Andrew Henderson and Scott Warren, organists (program below)   The largest mechanical-action organ ever installed in New York City will = celebrate its tenth birthday on=20 Sunday, April 27th, 2003 at 4:00 p.m. in a group recital by the team of = organists who regularly play it,=20 the resident musicians of the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola on Park = Avenue at 84th Street. The program will=20 be strong in the French repertoire of Nicolas de Grigny, Cesar Franck, = Olivier Messiaen and Charles Tournemire,=20 consistent with the instrument's sonic focus, but will also feature two = rarely-heard organ duets by=20 the 18-century Spanish master Antonio Soler and the contemporary English = composer John Rutter.   The organ's debut on April 27, 1993 coincided with an article by New = York Times writer Glenn Collins, who=20 had spent the previous six months following the construction of the = $1.25-million, 5,000- pipe, 30-ton, 45-foot-high=20 instrument, a project the Times described as "an event in musical and = religious life." Resulting enthusiasm=20 and interest from ABC, CNN, NPR, CBC and a host of other important media = culminated in a pre-recital=20 press conference with the builder, John Mander, the pastor of the = church, Fr. Walter Modrys, S.J.=20 and recitalist David Higgs. The concert itself was an historical event, = packing nearly 1,800 people into a church=20 that seats 1,200 at its major festival Sundays.   The 10th-anniversary recital will be enhanced by the presence of a = large-screen video projection unit,=20 underwritten by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, that allows the = audience to watch the organists at work. =20 A post-concert organ tour, led by Assistant Organist Andrew Henderson, = will give audience members a chance=20 to see the console up close and learn more about how the instrument = functions.   Advance-sale tickets are $15, $12 (students / seniors 65+). Tickets may = be purchased at the Church Rectory,=20 980 Park Avenue between 83rd and 84th Streets, any day between 9:00 AM = and 9:00 PM; online at=20 www.saintignatiusloyola.org; or by phone at 212-288-2520. Tickets will = be available at the door on the=20 afternoon of the concert for $20 / $15 (seniors/students). =20   PROGRAM   Antonio Soler: Concerto in G major Scott Warren, Kent Tritle J. S. Bach: Fantasy and Fugue in G Minor Kent Tritle Nicolas de Grigny: Tierce en taille Kent Tritle Cesar Franck: Fantasie in A Scott Warren Charles Tournemire: Choral-Improvisation sur le "Victimae paschali"=20 Nancianne Parrella Olivier Messiaen: L'Ascension:=20 ii) All=E9luias sereins iii) Transports de joie=20 Andrew Henderson John Rutter: Variations on an Easter Theme "O Filii et Filiae" Nancianne Parrella, Andrew Henderson   -Christine Hoffman Music Administrator Church of St. Ignatius Loyola 980 Park Avenue New York, NY 10028 phone 646.981.2612 fax 212.734.3671 hoffmanc@saintignatiusloyola.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Trinity's "Organ" Dedication NYC From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 10:18:59 EDT   I got no indication that anybody was interested in going at all. Furthermore, I had no idea that it was postponed or canceled. Guess it was =   big news. Of course, the completely useless, trashed, unrecoverable, total loss = of a pipe organ has been carefully removed, protected, crated, labeled, and securely stored, the way all items destined for the landfill are. How protective we are of our total losses...  
(back) Subject: Re: EUROPE and USA : Organ Builders of quality From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 10:24:56 EDT   Flentrop was considered IMPORTANT forty-five years ago, but was the = firm's work ever considered great? And does historical significance in the = context of a worldwide movement (which is only now beginning to be judged) make = them great today? We must also try to understand that of the sparks that flew over the Atlantic and ignited the fires of rebirth and rediscovery here in the = United States, von Beckerath's work may have been far more significant; Flentrop truly benefitted from an extraordinary publicity machine, allied with a particular personality.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: EUROPE and USA : Organ Builders of quality From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Mon, 07 Apr 2003 11:58:13 -0400   At 10:24 AM 4/7/2003 -0400, you wrote: > Flentrop was considered IMPORTANT forty-five years ago, but was the = firm's >work ever considered great? And does historical significance in the = context >of a worldwide movement (which is only now beginning to be judged) make = them >great today? > We must also try to understand that of the sparks that flew over the >Atlantic and ignited the fires of rebirth and rediscovery here in the = United >States, von Beckerath's work may have been far more significant; Flentrop >truly benefitted from an extraordinary publicity machine, allied with a >particular personality. > >Sebastian M. Gluck >New York City   Sebastian,   I think it is also fair to say that no matter which builder you talk = about, builders have more successful and less successful installations. If builders have been in business long enough, you will find changes in tonal =   thinking, build quality variations, etc. A lot of builders do some experimentations, some of which work, some don't etc.   As to Flentrop, I think they like everybody else did variable work. I = must say one of the reaons I got hooked on the sound of the classical organ was =   E.P. Biggs playing the Flentrop at Harvard on his recordings. A lot a beautiful, cheery, chirpy sounds which caught my fancy. Fast forward = about 10 years, I heard a couple a real live Flentrop organs, at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa, Canada, played by Gillian Wier. The larger one sounded pretty dismal, the smaller one much prettier. The acoustics were not of the kind where you would want to hear organs played, but kind of showed clinically what these organs actually sounded like. The larger = one, may have had some mechanical problems with it. I was most disappointed with what I heard. I have heard recordings of the Holy Rosary Flentrop in =   Chicago, the large Flentrop in Seattle, and they sound lovely to me. von Becherath, you are correct, may have had an even greater impact upon the No. American scene. I have heard the one in the Oratory in Montreal, and absolutely stunning stops, and choruses in that instrument.   Arie Vandenberg      
(back) Subject: RE: New Fire Regulations in Boston From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 13:07:46 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   It's quite late to ring in here- But Stanley's April Fools gives some food for thought because it can become truth some day- organs *are* firetraps. There was a thread about this last year in Piporg-L and recently another one. I myself wonder every time about this, although in Venezuela fire hazard/ security regulations are ridiculously lax. In churches with tinder-dry all wooden choirs and roofs with unenclosed electric wiring running gayly = across and under the structures, lots of candles burning in the open, and which = are crammed with higly flammable (and valuable) artworks from colony times the most you see is a fire extinguisher (if it was not stolen) and a set of emergency lights (that wasn't tested in years :)...   but it would be a good idea that we organ builders-technicians better get prepared to design a sprinkler device that meets with the specifications but doesn't endanger the organ by accidental trigging.   Incidentally the San Francisco church (that hosts one of our CC organs) = was closed down by the firefighters last Thursday- the entire roof structure = is giving way because it's ridden with termites. This will give an outrage- = the church is a main pilgrimage spot on Easter week! Not to speak my concern about the fate of the CC in these times of political turmoil. (Organ and church are under Heritage status and hencefore their fate is in the hands = of *this* government!!)- I'll try to keep info up to date concerning this.   Cheers Andres (Right now updating the mailbox!) =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Vincent Dubois in Cleveland From: "Jim Clouser" <CromorneCipher@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 13:11:22 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0009_01C2FD07.2F883810 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Hey gang,   For you in the Cleveland area - Vincent Dubois will be playing a recital = =3D at the Church of the Covenant (Euclid Ave, just down the block from =3D Severance Hall) at 8pm tomorrow night.   Jim Clouser ------=3D_NextPart_000_0009_01C2FD07.2F883810 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1141" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Hey gang,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>For you in the Cleveland area - = Vincent =3D Dubois will=3D20 be playing a recital at the Church of the Covenant (Euclid Ave, just =3D down the=3D20 block from Severance Hall) at 8pm tomorrow night.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Jim = Clouser</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0009_01C2FD07.2F883810--  
(back) Subject: RE: Episcopal churches in Arizona/Utah From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 14:34:20 -0400   Dan Gawthrop writes:   > "You mean "Jerry Ottley and the geriatrics?" is ill-informed and = factually false on a number of levels   Yes, and I admitted that much, adding that the Mormon Tabernacle Choir was actually a hard-working and worthy group. I was remembering a remark from someone else, made in the early 1980s, which I duly put in quotes and immediately rebutted myself. That's all in the original message.   I have sung and accompanied some of Mr. Gawthrop's compositions. They are fresh and exciting music. If I have found myself on the other end of an argument with him about musical standards, I am sure that I've done something wrong. Yes, frustration with the situation is widespread. But regardless of however bad the situation may be, I am sure that his own = work is a great influence for the better. That's really all any of us can be expected to do.   I apologize for starting this diversion.              
(back) Subject: RE: EUROPE and USA : Organ Builders of quality From: "andrew meagher" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 14:43:11 -0400   Last summer I played the Flentrop in Warner concert hall at Oberlin during = a conference held there in honor of the new Fisk built in the style of Cavaille-Coll. I found that the Flentrop was very useful for Bach and = other Baroque music before Bach. It was also very useful for Mendelssohn. However, I don't think it is very useful as an instrument in a concert = hall because the repertoire you can play on it is limited. If you are going to play an all Bach recital it is an great instrument, but for anything after Mendelssohn it is not very useful. This problem was a big part of the reason that Oberlin recently had the Fisk installed in Finney Chapel. = Prior to that the chapel had an Aeolian-Skinner in the chapel that was in disrepair and not of much use. So prior to the installation of the Fisk they didn't really have a concert organ that could play a wide variety of music. In a way they still don't. If you want to give a recital that includes baroque music and romantic French music neither the Flentrop or = the Fisk really does justice to both. In the end I think that the quality of = a builder really depends on what music you want to play on it. There are = very few organs that can do justice to all facets of the repertoire although = the best builders come as close as possible to this ideal.   Andrew Meagher     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of TubaMagna@aol.com Sent: Monday, April 07, 2003 10:25 AM To: harfo32@hotmail.com; pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: EUROPE and USA : Organ Builders of quality     Flentrop was considered IMPORTANT forty-five years ago, but was the = firm's work ever considered great? And does historical significance in the = context of a worldwide movement (which is only now beginning to be judged) make = them great today? We must also try to understand that of the sparks that flew over the Atlantic and ignited the fires of rebirth and rediscovery here in the = United States, von Beckerath's work may have been far more significant; Flentrop truly benefitted from an extraordinary publicity machine, allied with a particular personality.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: RE: how often the organs get PLAYED From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 15:36:32 -0400   Bud writes:   >By European standards, America is a VERY religious country; OTOH, they get crowds at ORGAN RECITALS in Europe that WE can only DREAM about.   When visiting Europe, I have never had the sense that the church is in = quite as bad a way that Americans like to think.   In some cases, the organs are not played much because of perpertual adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. This custom must be a source of considerable cognitive dissonance from the most devout organists, who = might love it themselves but would have to chafe at how it interferes with their work.   Evensong at S. Paul's and Westminster Abbey is well-attended. If one = wants to sit in the choir stalls at the Abbey for evensong, one had better get there two hours ahead of time. Oh, and wear comfortable shoes, because = you might be cooling your heels in line for two hours after "queueing up."   When I attended S. Sulpice on Sunday morning around 1990, there were a couple hundred in the congregation. That's not much for such a huge = church, but it wasn't as though it was deserted. There is also more of a tendency to full parish life for those that do participate, than perhaps there used to be.   In Switzerland, the Roman Catholic church just down the street from my = hotel had a wonderful service list-- different mass setting every Sunday, etc. = I doubt, realistically, that this repertoire was done by an all-professional choir, or one paid union wages. There must be many dedicated people doing it for the love of the music and the church.   The large urban cathedrals and churches have huge banks of literally hundreds of votive lights, and they are nearly all lit.   Re the American scene by contrast, I'm reading Mark Noll's very = illuminating book "The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind." Prof. Noll is an evangelical himself and a faculty member in Wheaton College. But he doesn't mince words. The scandal of the Evangelical mind is that there is so little OF = it, he says immediately and plainly in a single sentence. Then he devotes the rest of the book to pondering how things got that way and what to do about them.   He made two rather systemic points whose implications I had never considered, but they probably explain quite a bit. In 1790 the Congregationalists and other Protestant denominations had buttressed their doctrines with a formidable intellectual development, learning, and erudition. Noll implies that Jonathan Edwards, to name just one prominent figure, was a genius. Furthermore, most of the colleges in the U.S., our future greatest universities, were church-sponsored. However, only about 10% of the population of the U.S. were members of a church.   By the Civil war, this percentage had multipled several times, thanks to REVIVALISM. But Revivalism =3D asking people to shun the past, turn over = a new leaf, live in a totally new way. It is IMPOSSIBLE to maintain a tradition of learning, religious or otherwise, in that manner!   A parallel influence is the disestablishment clause in the Bill of Rights, which required the churches to appeal to the free will and allegiance of every individual. This situation favors the more individualistic and even solipsistic aspects of religious feeling and practice over the social and communal.   Given the influence of religion in American life, these two observations alone go far in accounting for the anti-intellectualism and also the philistinism for which it is notorious. Noll makes numerous other penetrating observations, as well, as he moves through history. Many secular authors of the caliber of Mencken, Barzun (who distinguishes intellect and aesthetics very carefully), and Bloom have bemoaned the situation and tried to account for it, but because of their lack of = respect and understanding of religion they have overlooked this aspect of the etiology.   Those of us who work in church music get the full brunt of these baleful influences or side-effects.        
(back) Subject: Re: how often the organs get PLAYED From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 07 Apr 2003 16:38:32 -0400   On 4/7/03 3:36 PM, "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > When visiting Europe, I have never had the sense that the church is in = quite > as bad a way that Americans like to think.   Paul: You write good stuff. Any time you feel like tossing off a few paragraphs, please know that it's being appreciated. I'd like to respond = to this post, but I've got to read it a few more times, and think about it = for at least a day. Thank you VERY MUCH.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: The Mormons, Organ-Building, and Music ( a little long) From: "David Carter" <davidorganist2002@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 13:48:59 -0700 (PDT)   I'll chime in here with a few observations/ramblings. I'm an = organist/choir director in an LDS ward in Sacramento (i.e. that is my current calling in the church). I have = 5-15 people in the choir on any given Sunday. I strive to have the choir sing at least once a = month, sometimes twice. I'm fortunate to have my sister living in my ward, she is my accompanist = for the choir. (I play the hymns, prelude and postlude for the service.)   There is a ward in Galt (a small town 20 miles south of Sacramento), that = has 30 people, or more. They often put on special contata performances, and perform many works = that take advantage of the larger size of the choir.   The bottom line to the size (and sometimes quality) of an LDS ward choir, = depends on how many singers reside in the ward (membership in a ward is based on geographic = area). The friend that Bud mentions probably resides in a ward that just doesn't have a lot of = members that want to sing in the choir. At times, when I was a choir director in another ward, I was = frustrated that not many people would make the commitment to sing in the choir. Thus, I was not = able to have the choir sing some pieces that require more voices. However, I did what I could, in = order to enhance the musical worship of the ward. In our book of scripture called the Doctrine & = Covenants, we have a verse that says, in paraphrase, that the 'song of the righteous is a prayer unto = ' God.   As has been mentioned, I am not paid for my musical service to the ward. I = was called by the bishop to be O/C Dir. In other wards where I have lived, I have served in = other positions not related to music. My day job is as a computer programmer for the state = legislature.   As to the organs in our buildings, Allen and Rodgers indeed have a few = models that appear often in LDS buildings. Generally, stake centers (buildings that serve an entire = stake, which is a group of wards, akin to a diocese) will have a larger model organ than a building = that just serves 2 or 3 wards. Allen organs have a 'Bass Coupler' tab that brings on 16ft tone to = notes below g-below-middle-c. Some Allen dealers call this tab the 'Mormon Cheater = Tab', to accomodate the pianist-turned-organist who doesn't play the pedals.   I have not had the good fortune to live in a ward where the building has a = pipe organ, perhaps someday I will. There are 3 LDS buildings in the Sacramento area that have = pipe organs, in the 8-11 rank range. One of them is a Moeller (in the 10xxx opus range), I'm = not aware of the builders of the other two.   As to the new Schoenstein in the fairly new conference center (april = 2000), it was built to accomodate large (21000+) congregations for special church conferences.   Just some observations...   David Carter Sacramento CA     --- quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I've been told the following by > Mormon friends, and also by organ-builders who have built for Mormon > churches: > > (1) Mormon musicians are NEVER paid (presumably with the exception of > the Tabernacle). <snip> > ...To this > end, several electronic manufacturers have brought out special "Mormon > models" for the use of Mormon churches. <snip> > A Mormon friend of mine who was involved in Mormon choral music at the > local level often lamented to me that he couldn't bring the repertoire > and expertise of his choir up to the level of the local Methodists (!), > and that even the lowest-common-denominator general protestant anthem > repertoire was quite beyond them; nor did they LIKE it, OR want to SING > it. <snip> > Given that (if indeed it's true), the building of yet ANOTHER huge organ > in Salt Lake City is something of a puzzlement, unless I REALLY don't > understand the relationship between what goes on musically in Salt Lake > and what goes on musically in the local church. The two seem rather > disconnected to an outsider. <snip>   __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - File online, calculators, forms, and more http://tax.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Looking for Handel From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 17:36:01 -0400   > I am trying to locate an organ transcription of Handel's "March" from > the Occasional Oratorio for an upcoming wedding. Anyone have this > piece? My (very old) copy was lost in a house fire, and I can't > remember the publisher or editor! Any help GREATLY appreciated. I > have searched the net to no avail, alas.   Tim,   Did you ever find this work? I have managed to find it in one of the "Everybody's Favorite" collections - #27 from 1939, compiled and arranged = by Roland Diggle. It was originally published by Amsco. That's the March in = D, right?   Hope this helps.   TommyLee Whitlock Reston, VA      
(back) Subject: Re: EUROPE and USA : Organ Builders of quality From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2003 21:12:53 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <harfo32@hotmail.com>; <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, April 07, 2003 9:24 AM Subject: Re: EUROPE and USA : Organ Builders of quality     > Flentrop was considered IMPORTANT forty-five years ago, but was the firm's > work ever considered great?   I would say that the firm's work very definitely was considered great, especially so far as the USA is concerned their earlier work such as the Busch-Reisinger Museum at Harvard.   And does historical significance in the context > of a worldwide movement (which is only now beginning to be judged) make them > great today?   Some of them, at least, yes.   > We must also try to understand that of the sparks that flew over the > Atlantic and ignited the fires of rebirth and rediscovery here in the United > States, von Beckerath's work may have been far more significant;   I agree that it is probably true of at least some of von Beckerath's work = -- especially St. Michael's, NYC -- that it is more historically significant than Flentrop's. But this does not mean that Flentrop's is not = historically significant.   Flentrop > truly benefitted from an extraordinary publicity machine, allied with a > particular personality.   And what is wrong with being a personality? E. M. Skinner was one, so was G. Donald Harrison, so was Charles Fisk. Most of the best organbuilders = of the past have also been masters of BS, and Flentrop was not unique in this respect.   I say all this as someone who is not -- and never really has been -- particularly in sympathy with Flentrop's work. I think, for example, of a cathedral that has two very fine Flentrop organs -- a two manual and a = four manual -- neither of which has a single string stop. This can hardly be regarded as liturgically useful, but nevertheless they are both in the context of their times outstanding instruments, and as such worthy of preservation.   John Speller