PipeChat Digest #3618 - Monday, April 21, 2003
 
communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
RE: Digital organs -  and why they don't sound real.
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Franz Schmidt
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Crescendo Pedal Programming Advice Sought
  by "Bob Richardson" <bob@peak.org>
Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries - reply
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Franz Schmidt
  by "Stephen Best" <sbest@borg.com>
Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Easter Sunday
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Dale Wood organ works
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Lyrical Widor
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Franz Schmidt
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
RE: communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Franz Schmidt - Arthur! Arthur!
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Dale Wood organ works
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
 

(back) Subject: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 20:34:38 -0500   Prompted by these recent email conversations, I just did a little = research, and to my astonishment learned that from the 12th century until Vatican = II, the Catholic faithful received only bread at communion, no wine. And even at Vatican II, wine was allowed only on special occasions. Furthermore, according to http://www.cathtelecom.com/news/203/43.php it was just a year ago that the Pope normalized communion under both species as a regular thing. I guess now with SARS they'll have to go back to 12th century practice.   Apparently this became a rallying point for Protestants in the Reformation who argued that the eucharist should be celebrated under both species. Which is kind of ironic now that low-church evangelicals have thrown out = the wine for grape juice, thus betraying the principle their Reformation forefathers fought for.   To make this more relevant to our chat list, do you organists generally commune? If so, when? Before or after?   To continue in a relevant vein, I have a totally different question, = though likewise of a survey nature. How is the offering voluntary regarded in = your church? As (a) an opportunity to present some meaningful and beautiful music, whether by the organist, a soloist, or the choir, or as (b) filler = to cover the time it takes the ushers to take up the money, and consequently should be no longer than strictly necessary for that most important task?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: RE: Digital organs - and why they don't sound real. From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 01:37:06 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   I have no intention of getting into the debate about classical v digital organs.   However, perhaps we might consider the following......   IF I use my own very high-end recording gear and record close-in, then replay it through a state of the art speaker system in church, a listener would be hard pushed to know that it wasn't the instrument being played live.   All this would come from a digital tape or disc.   If digital organs sound false, then the problem is one of programming surely?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK             --- Arie Vandenberg <ArieV@classicorgan.com> wrote: > The electronic instrument problem is that in general > they could be a lot > better, but then the price would go way up too. And > that is what a lot of > electronic instruments face, if the cost is too > high, might as well buy the > real thing.     __________________________________________________ Yahoo! Plus For a better Internet experience http://www.yahoo.co.uk/btoffer  
(back) Subject: Re: Franz Schmidt From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 01:45:08 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   I would also like to know a lot more about Schmidt's music and availability.   I recall a BBC broadcast on a fine new organ in the Merchant Taylor's Hall, London when, (I think) Lady Susi Jeans played a Schmidt work.   Somewhere, I have it on a 7" reel of tape in Mono!!   It will take some persuasion for me to dig out the old Ferrograph recorder and listen to it again.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   __________________________________________________ Yahoo! Plus For a better Internet experience http://www.yahoo.co.uk/btoffer  
(back) Subject: Crescendo Pedal Programming Advice Sought From: "Bob Richardson" <bob@peak.org> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 17:49:26 -0700   Hello all -   My digital organ project which gave concerts in the desert last summer is=20 ready to be "dusted off" and loose ends tied up - slightly revised wiring,= =20 more careful voicing for permanent installation, etc.   One feature of the instrument is a crescendo pedal. Back in my=20 organ-student days, most of the organs I practiced on did not have a=20 crescendo pedal, so I never really learned the pros and cons of its use,=20 and (more importantly to me), how to set one up.   I realize that crescendo pedals are often overused, and, in the wrong=20 hands, can be garish... please rest assured I'll keep that in mind while=20 messing around. :-)   As of right now, the crescendo pedal in my organ is unprogrammed - it=20 engages no stops. Before I program it, I need to read up on the theory=20 behind selecting appropriate stops to add/delete as the pedal progresses.   I would greatly appreciate pointers to any online articles or books I might= =20 find in the local (Portland, OR) library or used book store which delve=20 into crescendo pedal setup theory.   Or, if anyone on this list wants to take a stab at it, I'm posting my=20 stoplist below.   The tone generators are the Ahlborn 201 and the Ahlborn Romantic modules,=20 in case you're familiar with the sound of their stops. There are 20 steps= =20 to the crescendo pedal memory, though I don't have to use them all. A=20 color-coded stoplist which indicates which module supplies a particular=20 stop is provided on my web site at=20 http://www.bobrichardson.com/desert_organ_4.html (scroll to the bottom.)   Thanks in advance for any advice!   Bob Richardson bob@peak.org   Here's the stoplist:   Great   Bourdon 16' Principal 8' Fl=FBte =E0 chemin=E9e 8' Unda Maris 8' Cello 8' Cello Celeste 8' Octave 4' Spitzfl=F6te 4' Nasard 2 2/3' Superoctave 2' Cornet des Bombardes IV Mixture IV Cornopean 16' Tuba Mirabilis 8' Cor Anglais 8' Trompete 8' French Horn 8' Orchestral Oboe 8' Clarinet 8' Clarion 4' Swell to Great Tremulant   Swell   Open Diapason 8' Flauto Mirabilis 8' Gedackt 8' Gamba 8' Concert Flute 4' Nachthorn 4' Quint Flute 2 2/3' Piccolo 2' Cymbale III Cornet III Oboe 8' Vox Humana 8' Great to Swell Tremulant   Pedal   Contre Violone 32' Contre Gambe 16' Subbass 16' Octave 8' Bourdon 8' Contre Basson 32' Ophicleide 16' Posaune 16' Great to Pedal Swell to Pedal    
(back) Subject: Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries - reply From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 20:52:12 EDT     --part1_b4.1bc52359.2bd5ec3c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 4/21/2003 8:41:14 PM Eastern Daylight Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:     > Apparently this became a rallying point for Protestants in the = Reformation > who argued that the eucharist should be celebrated under both species. > Which is kind of ironic now that low-church evangelicals have thrown out = the > wine for grape juice, thus betraying the principle their Reformation > forefathers fought for. > > To make this more relevant to our chat list, do you organists generally > commune? If so, when? Before or after? > > To continue in a relevant vein, I have a totally different question, = though > likewise of a survey nature. How is the offering voluntary regarded in = your > church? As (a) an opportunity to present some meaningful and beautiful > music, whether by the organist, a soloist, or the choir, or as (b) = filler to > cover the time it takes the ushers to take up the money, and = consequently > should be no longer than strictly necessary for that most important = task? > >   Regarding communion...in my congregation, which is a United Methodist = church, the choir comes first to the communion rail, as we are located in the chancel, and in our particular church, the communion rail is located at = the rear of the chancel (rather more like an Episcopal church than the typical = UM church)   Regarding the Offering (organ volunatry)...the answer is BOTH a and b....depending on who in the congregation you ask.   Rick in VA   --part1_b4.1bc52359.2bd5ec3c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>In a message dated = 4/21/2=3D 003 8:41:14 PM Eastern Daylight Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-=3D LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Apparently this became a = ra=3D llying point for Protestants in the Reformation <BR>who argued that the eucharist should be celebrated under both species. <BR>Which is kind of ironic now that low-church evangelicals have thrown = out=3D the <BR>wine for grape juice, thus betraying the principle their Reformation <BR>forefathers fought for. <BR> <BR>To make this more relevant to our chat list, do you organists = generally <BR>commune? &nbsp;If so, when? &nbsp;Before or after? <BR> <BR>To continue in a relevant vein, I have a totally different question, = tho=3D ugh <BR>likewise of a survey nature. &nbsp;How is the offering voluntary = regarde=3D d in your <BR>church? &nbsp;As (a) an opportunity to present some meaningful and = beaut=3D iful <BR>music, whether by the organist, a soloist, or the choir, or as (b) = fille=3D r to <BR>cover the time it takes the ushers to take up the money, and = consequentl=3D y <BR>should be no longer than strictly necessary for that most important = task=3D ? <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Regarding communion...in my congregation, which is a United Methodist = ch=3D urch, the choir comes first to the communion rail, as we are located in = the=3D20=3D chancel, and in our particular church, the communion rail is located at = the=3D20=3D rear of the chancel (rather more like an Episcopal church than the typical = U=3D M church) <BR> <BR>Regarding the Offering (organ volunatry)...the answer is BOTH a and = b...=3D ..depending on who in the congregation you ask. <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_b4.1bc52359.2bd5ec3c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Franz Schmidt From: "Stephen Best" <sbest@borg.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 20:55:54 -0400   Anyone looking for information on Arthur Schmidt should to to http://www.concertartist.info/bio/LAM001.html. Arthur Lamirande has long championed the music of Schmidt...with the greatest of passion!   You can also go to the PIPORG-L archives at http://www.albany.edu/piporg-l and do a search for Schmidt, who was discussed at great length during Lamirande's time as a member.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   Colin Mitchell wrote:   >Hello, > >I would also like to know a lot more about Schmidt's >music and availability. > >      
(back) Subject: Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 18:02:33 -0700       Randolph Runyon wrote: > > Prompted by these recent email conversations, I just did a little = research, > and to my astonishment learned that from the 12th century until Vatican = II, > the Catholic faithful received only bread at communion, no wine.   Since it is Christ's living, glorified Body that we receive, either Species (bread OR wine) contains the whole ... Body and Blood.   The chalice was withdrawn in the 12th century following the so-called "Miracle of Urbano", in which a priest allegedly broke the Host at the Fraction and it bled. The pope instituted the Feast of Corpus Christi (Thursday after Trinity Sunday) to commemorate the event, and appointed St. Thomas Aquinas to write the texts of the Mass and Office. The Sequence, "Lauda Sion", is a succinct summary of the Roman Catholic doctrine of Transubstantiation in verse, which doctrine, I believe, was NOT doctrine up until that time.   The withdrawal of the chalice from the laity had to do with a superstitious fear on the part of the priests of spilling the Most Precious Blood while communicating the people.   Transubstantiation is a particular *philosophical* definition of the MANNER of Christ's presence in the Sacred Species, which depends on an acceptance of Aristotle's view of matter, "accidents" and "essence." Anglicans, along with the Eastern Orthodox, proclaim that "the Eucharist is a great Mystery of Faith", and are content to leave it at that. It HAPPENS; we don't know WHEN, precisely, or HOW.   And even > at Vatican II, wine was allowed only on special occasions. Furthermore, > according to http://www.cathtelecom.com/news/203/43.php it was just a = year > ago that the Pope normalized communion under both species as a regular > thing. I guess now with SARS they'll have to go back to 12th century > practice.   The Anglican Church restored the chalice to the people in 1549 ... since that time, I don't recall EVER reading or hearing of ANYTHING being spread by the use of the common cup. The combination of alcohol and silver or gold has been proven to be germicidal in a couple of 20th century studies. > > Apparently this became a rallying point for Protestants in the = Reformation > who argued that the eucharist should be celebrated under both species. > Which is kind of ironic now that low-church evangelicals have thrown out = the > wine for grape juice, thus betraying the principle their Reformation > forefathers fought for.   And the Eucharist promptly disappeared as the principal service, even among orthodox Lutherans and Anglicans.   > > To make this more relevant to our chat list, do you organists generally > commune? If so, when? Before or after?   Not very often. I have to negotiate a flight of stairs and walk the length of the parish hall to get to the BACK of the church ... there's no direct route from the choir loft to the nave floor.   > > To continue in a relevant vein, I have a totally different question, = though > likewise of a survey nature. How is the offering voluntary regarded in = your > church? As (a) an opportunity to present some meaningful and beautiful > music, whether by the organist, a soloist, or the choir, or as (b) = filler to > cover the time it takes the ushers to take up the money, and = consequently > should be no longer than strictly necessary for that most important = task? > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu >   A bit of both ... it's the ONE time in the Mass when the Rector will WAIT for us to finish whatever we're doing without fidgeting and/or glaring at the choir loft (chuckle). OTOH, I know not to go on for more than ten minutes TOPS, no matter HOW big a feast day it happens to be (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 21:16:15 -0500     > > The chalice was withdrawn in the 12th century following the so-called > "Miracle of Urbano", in which a priest allegedly broke the Host at the > Fraction and it bled. The pope instituted the Feast of Corpus Christi > (Thursday after Trinity Sunday) to commemorate the event, and appointed > St. Thomas Aquinas to write the texts of the Mass and Office. The > Sequence, "Lauda Sion", is a succinct summary of the Roman Catholic > doctrine of Transubstantiation in verse, which doctrine, I believe, was > NOT doctrine up until that time.     This is amazing. So you mean that the great hymn Panis Angelicus was written by Saint Thomas as propaganda for the notion that people should be satisfied with the bread and not disappointed that they're not getting any wine? It's like an advertisement for Wonder Bread as containing all = twelve vitamins and minerals! Aquinas as spinmaster for the Pope! History is = full of fascinating turns.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Easter Sunday From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 20:19:21 -0500   Did anyone out there play my favorite Tournemire: Choral improvisation on 'Victimae Paschali'? I listened to a CD of that on the way to an Easter luncheon and wondered aloud if anyone played it.   Rick had the radio on earlier listening to some unidentified service, at which the choir and organ performed a lyrical version of Widor's Toccata. I never identified the church or the words being sung, except I caught an "Alleluia" in there.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com        
(back) Subject: RE: Dale Wood organ works From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 20:19:21 -0500   I remember a friend playing a Dale Wood organ piece on "When I can read my title clear" which was very lively and pretty, and one of my favorite hymns as a child (which was a harbinger of my becoming an attorney, I think). The Amazing Grace which John (?) Near played on his recording at Mother Church is very accessible and pretty also.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com        
(back) Subject: Lyrical Widor From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 20:30:36 -0500   Hi! Sir David Willcocks wrote a setting of the Widor Toccata with lyrics called, I believe, "Sing Praise." We performed it at the 2002 Church Music Explosion at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church in Ft. Lauderdale where Sir David was guest conductor. John Weaver played the organ part. What a treat!!!     Paschal Blessings, Beau Surratt, Organist St. Peter's UCC, Elmhurst,IL Organ Performance Major, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb,IL     -----Original Message----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 20:19:21 -0500 Subject: Easter Sunday   > Did anyone out there play my favorite Tournemire: Choral improvisation > on 'Victimae Paschali'? I listened to a CD of that on the way to an > Easter luncheon and wondered aloud if anyone played it. > > Rick had the radio on earlier listening to some unidentified service, > at > which the choir and organ performed a lyrical version of Widor's > Toccata. I never identified the church or the words being sung, except > I caught an "Alleluia" in there. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 18:42:49 -0700   Yep, more or less. "Panis angelicus" is the last two verses of "Sacris solemniis", one of the Office Hymns, which also spells out the dogma in great detail.   Cheers,   Bud   Randolph Runyon wrote: > > > > > The chalice was withdrawn in the 12th century following the so-called > > "Miracle of Urbano", in which a priest allegedly broke the Host at the > > Fraction and it bled. The pope instituted the Feast of Corpus Christi > > (Thursday after Trinity Sunday) to commemorate the event, and = appointed > > St. Thomas Aquinas to write the texts of the Mass and Office. The > > Sequence, "Lauda Sion", is a succinct summary of the Roman Catholic > > doctrine of Transubstantiation in verse, which doctrine, I believe, = was > > NOT doctrine up until that time. > > This is amazing. So you mean that the great hymn Panis Angelicus was > written by Saint Thomas as propaganda for the notion that people should = be > satisfied with the bread and not disappointed that they're not getting = any > wine? It's like an advertisement for Wonder Bread as containing all = twelve > vitamins and minerals! Aquinas as spinmaster for the Pope! History is = full > of fascinating turns. > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Franz Schmidt From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 20:43:18 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, April 21, 2003 7:45 PM Subject: Re: Franz Schmidt     > Hello, > > I would also like to know a lot more about Schmidt's > music and availability. > > I recall a BBC broadcast on a fine new organ in the > Merchant Taylor's Hall, London when, (I think) Lady > Susi Jeans played a Schmidt work. > > Somewhere, I have it on a 7" reel of tape in Mono!! > > It will take some persuasion for me to dig out the old > Ferrograph recorder and listen to it again.   The only piece by Schmidt I have heard is his "Toccata", which made quite = an impression on me when played many years ago (c. 1971?) by David Sanger on the Hill organ at Holy Trinity, Taunton. More recently, at the end of = last year, one of David Sanger's former students, David Goode, also made a nice job of it on the new Quimby organ at William Jewell College, in Liberty, Missouri.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: RE: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2003 21:49:37 -0400   > Which is kind of ironic now that low-church evangelicals have thrown out the wine for grape juice, thus betraying the principle their Reformation forefathers fought for.   They do the like all the time. This would be ludicrous if, in all their serene ignorance of history and most else, they weren't threatening the American political order so gravely.   >To make this more relevant to our chat list, do you organists generally commune? If so, when? Before or after?   Yes, I generally go to Communion, but the time in my experience has = varied. Most often, the choir and I have gone first, and I prefer this = logistically. If last, how in the world does one even know when to reach a suitable cadence so as to approach the rail at the right time? And even if one knows, is it practicable without violence to the music? And then mustn't one go back to the organ and play some more to cover the ablutions? I = doubt that good music is quite so amorphous as water coming from a faucet that = one can turn on and off in a second, and I'd rather not encourage such an impression. We might have to do differently, of course, if the Agnus Dei were choral and extended enough that it would hold up the proceedings at = the altar if the choir went first; for such problems I should pray...   > How is the offering voluntary regarded in your church? As (a) an opportunity to present some meaningful and beautiful music, whether by the organist, a soloist, or the choir, or as (b) filler = to cover the time it takes the ushers to take up the money, and consequently should be no longer than strictly necessary for that most important task?   This is potential case of water-faucet music. I'd try to use voluntaries comparable to the time actually required for the liturgical action, and = not much more; but if they are to make a liturgical and artistic contribution rather than merely indulge a popular horror of silence, occasionally = another minute or two might be needed. You can probably have muzak that is just long enough, or you can have music with integrity and a modicum of = variety while adorning the themes of the liturgy; but only a church that pays a superb improviser his due (and alas I don't qualify) has the right to = demand both simultaneously, and short of the ideal my preference would be for the second.   "Offertory" voluntaries are on shaky ground liturgically anyway, I feel. Either a motet or a hymn is more ideal. But some shrewd liturgists = observe that if people in the congregation are busy singing a hymn, then they = don't notice anyone putting nothing into the plate when it is passed-- a fact which would make the motet preferable :-) The nature of the offertory is participation. I quite approve of considering the offertory "anthem" as = a choir's collegial offering of music on behalf of the congregation, in = which they further participate by listening-- but I'm not so comfortable with = this vicariousness being undertaken by, and focused onto, just one (an = organist) or two (soloist and accompanist) individuals.   I must close with my pedantic little reminder, for anyone who might not already know, that whatever it is isn't an offertory at all unless Eucharistic elements are being prepared on the altar. Outside of a Communion service, we should call it something else!   Paul                                     > -----Original Message----- > From: Randolph Runyon [SMTP:runyonr@muohio.edu] > Sent: Monday, April 21, 2003 9:35 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: communing organists and offertory voluntaries > > Prompted by these recent email conversations, I just did a little > research, > and to my astonishment learned that from the 12th century until Vatican > II, > the Catholic faithful received only bread at communion, no wine. And = even > at Vatican II, wine was allowed only on special occasions. Furthermore, > according to http://www.cathtelecom.com/news/203/43.php it was just a = year > ago that the Pope normalized communion under both species as a regular > thing. I guess now with SARS they'll have to go back to 12th century > practice. > > Apparently this became a rallying point for Protestants in the = Reformation > who argued that the eucharist should be celebrated under both species. > Which is kind of ironic now that low-church evangelicals have thrown out > the > wine for grape juice, thus betraying the principle their Reformation > forefathers fought for. > > To make this more relevant to our chat list, do you organists generally > commune? If so, when? Before or after? > > To continue in a relevant vein, I have a totally different question, > though > likewise of a survey nature. How is the offering voluntary regarded in > your > church? As (a) an opportunity to present some meaningful and beautiful > music, whether by the organist, a soloist, or the choir, or as (b) = filler > to > cover the time it takes the ushers to take up the money, and = consequently > should be no longer than strictly necessary for that most important = task? > > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Franz Schmidt - Arthur! Arthur! From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 22:07:28 -0400   Where, O where is Arthur LaMirande, now that we [finally] need him?!   FYI, until he left in high dudgeon*, he was on the lists several years = ago, and is an acolyte at Schmidt's altar. What he didn't know about the man and his music was not = worth knowing. He went everywhere to performances of Schmidt and perfomed the organ works = himself. He was/is also highly opinionated and argumentative, traits wholly unknown among us and thus = especially remarkable.   Oh yeah.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh   * or was terminated**, forget which.   ** with prejudice, but not extreme.   :-)    
(back) Subject: Re: Dale Wood organ works From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 22:10:59 -0400   How about using one of his fine hymn free accomps?   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh