PipeChat Digest #3621 - Tuesday, April 22, 2003
 
OHS Convention Registration Online
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Franz Schmidt - Arthur! Arthur!
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries - reply
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Franz Schmidt - Arthur! Arthur!
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
Re: Salt Lake City AGO redux
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Dale Wood music
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Walking Music
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: Walking Music
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
looking for sheet music
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Gospel processions
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: looking for sheet music
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Becker-Ferris-Widor "Alleluia"
  by <lindr@cch.com>
 

(back) Subject: OHS Convention Registration Online From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 10:11:31 -0400   Online registration for the OHS Convention in South Central Pennsylvania June 19-26 is now available at http://www.organsociety.org/2003/registration.html   This supplements the choice of registration method. Already in place were registration form downloads. Also, printed forms were mailed to OHS = members three weeks ago. Of course, we welcome all to attend an OHS convention and membership enrollment is part of the registration process for those who = are not OHS members.   More information is also available, including pictures of the organs and a schedule, at http://www.organsociety.org/2003   Bill      
(back) Subject: Re: Franz Schmidt - Arthur! Arthur! From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 07:22:08 -0700 (PDT)   Greetings to all!   I did a search for Arthur LaMirande on Google, found his web site, and had a look.   I found various e-mail addresses there which you can use to e-mail him an inquiry. The addresses are as follows:   alamirande@aol.com   alamirande@yahoo.com   alamirande2001@yahoo.com   In the past whenever I e-mailed him a request for information, he always sent me a very cordial, informative reply.   Why not e-mail him about Mr. Schmidt, and see what Mr. Lamirande has to say. He seems to be a very dedicated, knowledgeable musician.   Best wishes to all...     Morton Belcher fellow list member....       --- Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote: > On 4/22/03 10:07 PM, "Stan Yoder" > <vze2myh5@verizon.net> wrote: > > > Where, O where is Arthur LaMirande, now that we > [finally] need him?! > > Good question.   > With bated breath, I await news. > > Alan >     __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo http://search.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries - reply From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 10:22:56 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3133851777_249892 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 4/21/03 8:52 PM, "RMaryman@aol.com" <RMaryman@aol.com> wrote:   > In a message dated 4/21/2003 8:41:14 PM Eastern Daylight Time, > runyonr@muohio.edu writes: >=3D20 >> Apparently this became a rallying point for Protestants in the = Reformati=3D on >> who argued that the eucharist should be celebrated under both species. >> Which is kind of ironic now that low-church evangelicals have thrown = out=3D the >> wine for grape juice, thus betraying the principle their Reformation >> forefathers fought for. >>=3D20 >> To make this more relevant to our chat list, do you organists generally >> commune? If so, when? Before or after? >>=3D20 >> =3D80=3D80=3D80With the choir. And the choir communes first (after the = celebrant an=3D d his >> assistants)--the rationale being that they=3DB9re back in their places = to pr=3D ovide >> music for the communion of the rest of the congregation. His and = choir=3DB9=3D s >> communion is thus silent, which is fine with us, though I=3DB9ve heard = of >> parishes where the celebrant can=3DB9t STAND silence, and demands that = the >> organist commune at the console, with the elements brought to him = there. >> Nothing wrong with communing while on the bench, but the rationale is = si=3D lly >> as the deuce. =3D20 >>=3D20 >> To continue in a relevant vein, I have a totally different question, = tho=3D ugh >> likewise of a survey nature. How is the offering voluntary regarded in = =3D your >> church? As (a) an opportunity to present some meaningful and beautiful >> music, whether by the organist, a soloist, or the choir, or as (b) = fille=3D r to >> cover the time it takes the ushers to take up the money, and = consequentl=3D y >> should be no longer than strictly necessary for that most important = task=3D ? >>=3D20 >> =3D80=3D80=3D80 For us, it=3DB9s (a) for sure. When the plates are = filled, they=3DB9re brou=3D ght >> (the congregation standing, of course) to the altar along with the = bread=3D and >> wine and the table is =3DB3set=3DB2 by the deacon. (And the altar, = gifts, and p=3D eople >> are censed, if it=3DB9s a festival day.) That can easily take a minute = or t=3D wo. >> On occasion, the planned organ/choral work STILL has several minutes = yet=3D to >> go, with the result that the congregation remains standing = unnecessarily >> long. We need better communication, where the organist notifies the = ush=3D ers >> to come forward with the gifts (=3DB3when we modulate into F#=3DB2) so = that the =3D music >> and the whole offertory/censing process wind up SOMEwhere near >> simultaneously. (On the other hand, if the music is shorter than = ideal,=3D our >> organist is a whip at improvisation on the anthem themes to cover the = ce=3D nsing >> activity.) >>=3D20 >> Alan (with photos of the above at www.stlukesnyc.org) >>=3D20 >>=3D20 >>=3D20     --B_3133851777_249892 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries - reply</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 4/21/03 8:52 PM, = &quot;RMaryman@aol.com&quo=3D t; &lt;RMaryman@aol.com&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">In a message dated = 4/21/200=3D 3 8:41:14 PM Eastern Daylight Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes: <BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">Apparently this became = a ra=3D llying point for Protestants in the Reformation <BR> who argued that the eucharist should be celebrated under both species. = <BR> Which is kind of ironic now that low-church evangelicals have thrown out = th=3D e <BR> wine for grape juice, thus betraying the principle their Reformation <BR> forefathers fought for. <BR> <BR> To make this more relevant to our chat list, do you organists generally = <BR=3D > commune? &nbsp;If so, when? &nbsp;Before or after? <BR> <BR> =3D80=3D80=3D80With the choir. &nbsp;And the choir communes first (after the celebrant = =3D and his assistants)--the rationale being that they&#8217;re back in their = pl=3D aces to provide music for the communion of the rest of the congregation. = &nb=3D sp;His and choir&#8217;s communion is thus silent, which is fine with us, = th=3D ough I&#8217;ve heard of parishes where the celebrant can&#8217;t STAND = sile=3D nce, and demands that the organist commune at the console, with the = elements=3D brought to him there. &nbsp;Nothing wrong with communing while on the = bench=3D , but the rationale is silly as the deuce. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> To continue in a relevant vein, I have a totally different question, = though=3D <BR> likewise of a survey nature. &nbsp;How is the offering voluntary regarded = i=3D n your <BR> church? &nbsp;As (a) an opportunity to present some meaningful and = beautifu=3D l <BR> music, whether by the organist, a soloist, or the choir, or as (b) filler = t=3D o <BR> cover the time it takes the ushers to take up the money, and consequently = <=3D BR> should be no longer than strictly necessary for that most important task? = <=3D BR> <BR> =3D80=3D80=3D80 For us, it&#8217;s (a) for sure. &nbsp;When the plates are = filled, they=3D &#8217;re brought (the congregation standing, of course) to the altar = along =3D with the bread and wine and the table is &#8220;set&#8221; by the deacon. = &n=3D bsp;(And the altar, gifts, and people are censed, if it&#8217;s a festival = d=3D ay.) &nbsp;That can easily take a minute or two. &nbsp;On occasion, the = plan=3D ned organ/choral work STILL has several minutes yet to go, with the result = t=3D hat the congregation remains standing unnecessarily long. &nbsp;We need = bett=3D er communication, where the organist notifies the ushers to come forward = wit=3D h the gifts (&#8220;when we modulate into F#&#8221;) so that the music and = t=3D he whole offertory/censing process wind up SOMEwhere near simultaneously. = &n=3D bsp;(On the other hand, if the music is shorter than ideal, our organist = is =3D a whip at improvisation on the anthem themes to cover the censing = activity.)=3D <BR> <BR> Alan (with photos of the above at www.stlukesnyc.org)<BR> <BR> <FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><BR> </FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman"><FONT = SIZE=3D3D"2"><BR> </FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3133851777_249892--    
(back) Subject: Re: Franz Schmidt - Arthur! Arthur! From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 10:37:15 -0400   I have had similar experiences with Arthur. He is a very erudite and learned gentleman, and is more than gracious with anyone who cares to talk to him (especially about Franz Schmidt!). I also had the pleasure of hearing him play in recital at the Washington National Cathedral about a year and a half ago, where he played Schmidt's *Passacaglia.* The work simply blew me away. Arthur is an organist of quite formidable ability. = He tends to be prickly when corresponding "on-list," but if you can get = around that, he's a very worthwhile guy to have around.     ----- Original Message ----- From: <littlebayus@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2003 10:22 AM Subject: Re: Franz Schmidt - Arthur! Arthur!     > Greetings to all! > > I did a search for Arthur LaMirande on Google, found > his web site, and had a look. > > I found various e-mail addresses there which you can > use to e-mail him an inquiry. The addresses are as > follows: > > alamirande@aol.com > > alamirande@yahoo.com > > alamirande2001@yahoo.com > > In the past whenever I e-mailed him a request for > information, he always sent me a very cordial, > informative reply. > > Why not e-mail him about Mr. Schmidt, and see what Mr. > Lamirande has to say. He seems to be a very > dedicated, knowledgeable musician. > > Best wishes to all... > > > Morton Belcher > fellow list member.... > > > > --- Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote: > > On 4/22/03 10:07 PM, "Stan Yoder" > > <vze2myh5@verizon.net> wrote: > > > > > Where, O where is Arthur LaMirande, now that we > > [finally] need him?! > > > > Good question. > > > With bated breath, I await news. > > > > Alan > > > > > __________________________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo > http://search.yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Salt Lake City AGO redux From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 11:09:29 EDT     --part1_99.3691be19.2bd6b529_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Gang........   As a list member and also a convention exhibitor, you will be most welcome = to use the Austin Organs booth as a meeting place.   Bill Hesterman   --part1_99.3691be19.2bd6b529_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D3 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Hi Gang........<BR> <BR> As a list member and also a convention exhibitor, you will be most welcome = t=3D o use the Austin Organs booth as a meeting place.<BR> <BR> Bill Hesterman</FONT></HTML>   --part1_99.3691be19.2bd6b529_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 11:11:47 -0500     > > They do the like all the time. This would be ludicrous if, in all = their > serene ignorance of history and most else, they weren't threatening the > American political order so gravely.   Amen, brother.   > > I must close with my pedantic little reminder, for anyone who might not > already know, that whatever it is isn't an offertory at all unless > Eucharistic elements are being prepared on the altar. Outside of a > Communion service, we should call it something else! > > Paul   Any suggestion on proper nomenclature? We have communion every other Sunday, which means that every other other Sunday we don't. On the = latter, call it "the collection" perhaps?   As for "water faucet muzak" I don't care for it either, but I seem to have read somewhere that in the Middle Ages some liturgical music evolved from the music that was played to fill the time the priests took to walk from = one place to another in the cathedral.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Dale Wood music From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 11:19:38 -0500   I especially like his "Caricature of a Sunday School Song." But you need a congregation with a sense of humor. Not quite as far out as Virgil Thomson's Variations on Four Sunday School Tunes, but in that direction.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu          
(back) Subject: Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 11:22:12 -0400   On 4/21/03 9:02 PM, "quilisma@socal.rr.com" <quilisma@socal.rr.com> wrote: > > Randolph Runyon wrote: >> >> Prompted by these recent email conversations, I just did a little = research, >> and to my astonishment learned that from the 12th century until Vatican = II, >> the Catholic faithful received only bread at communion, no wine. > > Since it is Christ's living, glorified Body that we receive, either > Species (bread OR wine) contains the whole ... Body and Blood.   True. And if you want to astonish someone, you can off-handedly refer to that as the doctrine of concomitance. > > The chalice was withdrawn in the 12th century following the so-called > "Miracle of Urbano", in which a priest allegedly broke the Host at the > Fraction and it bled. The pope instituted the Feast of Corpus Christi > (Thursday after Trinity Sunday) to commemorate the event, and appointed > St. Thomas Aquinas to write the texts of the Mass and Office. The > Sequence, "Lauda Sion", is a succinct summary of the Roman Catholic > doctrine of Transubstantiation in verse, which doctrine, I believe, was > NOT doctrine up until that time.   My understanding as well. But it has to be said that the doctrine of the Real Presence was not new then, by any means. Which causes to much confusion to many RCs who erroneously confuse Real Presence with Transubstantiation; those two doctrines are NOT the same. > > The withdrawal of the chalice from the laity had to do with a > superstitious fear on the part of the priests of spilling the Most > Precious Blood while communicating the people.   Not only on the part of the priests. The people were even MORE scared of it, if that's possible. Even of the HOST! They had to be dragged kicking and screaming to do their annual Easter communion, they were so terrified = of touching the Holy Body and Precious Blood. > > Transubstantiation is a particular *philosophical* definition of the > MANNER of Christ's presence in the Sacred Species, which depends on an > acceptance of Aristotle's view of matter, "accidents" and "essence." > Anglicans, along with the Eastern Orthodox, proclaim that "the Eucharist > is a great Mystery of Faith", and are content to leave it at that. It > HAPPENS; we don't know WHEN, precisely, or HOW.   This Lutheran (and Lutheran teaching by definition) certainly agrees 100% with that explanation of what cannot be explained. > >> And even >> at Vatican II, wine was allowed only on special occasions. = Furthermore, >> according to http://www.cathtelecom.com/news/203/43.php it was just a = year >> ago that the Pope normalized communion under both species as a regular >> thing. I guess now with SARS they'll have to go back to 12th century >> practice. > > The Anglican Church restored the chalice to the people in 1549 ... since > that time, I don't recall EVER reading or hearing of ANYTHING being > spread by the use of the common cup. The combination of alcohol and > silver or gold has been proven to be germicidal in a couple of 20th > century studies. >> >> Apparently this became a rallying point for Protestants in the = Reformation >> who argued that the eucharist should be celebrated under both species. >> Which is kind of ironic now that low-church evangelicals have thrown = out the >> wine for grape juice, thus betraying the principle their Reformation >> forefathers fought for. > > And the Eucharist promptly disappeared as the principal service, even > among orthodox Lutherans and Anglicans. > Yes, but for other reasons. You'd have a hard time selling eucharistic theology (forget about piety) to a century loaded with Rationalism = followed by another one loaded with Pietism. >> >> To make this more relevant to our chat list, do you organists generally >> commune? If so, when? Before or after? > > Not very often. I have to negotiate a flight of stairs and walk the > length of the parish hall to get to the BACK of the church ... there's > no direct route from the choir loft to the nave floor.   My (non-musician) pew is at the west door of the nave (to deal with whatver from that end of "the house"). Pastor knows plumb well that if the trip = up the aisle gets to be a problem for me he'll bring the eucharist to me in = my pew. (Not yet; maybe next year.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 11:29:49 -0400   On 4/21/03 9:42 PM, "quilisma@socal.rr.com" <quilisma@socal.rr.com> wrote:   >> people should be satisfied with the bread and not disappointed >> that they're not getting any wine?   Well, except that (as I noted elsewhere) they didn't want either ONE. It was just too SCARY in those days.   The "mysterium" was oversold? Perhaps, a bit. Opposite of today, isn't = it?   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 11:29:14 -0400   >Any suggestion on proper nomenclature? We have communion every other Sunday, which means that every other other Sunday we don't. On the = latter, call it "the collection" perhaps?   That's probably best. Perhaps Colin or another of our British friends can tell us what point in the service the eighteenth-century "Voluntaries" by Stanley et al. were intended for. My recollection is that they were = neither preludes nor postludes, but were played somewhere in the middle of the service. Even today, I have occasionally seen service lists etc. that = refer to a particular organ piece played during the service as "The Voluntary" = (as though it were the only one and that one was expected at that moment).      
(back) Subject: Walking Music From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 12:37:51 -0400   > > As for "water faucet muzak" I don't care for it either, but I seem to = have > read somewhere that in the Middle Ages some liturgical music evolved = from > the music that was played to fill the time the priests took to walk from one > place to another in the cathedral. > Indeed, the Gradual, sung as the priest descended the steps = (gradus/gradua) to proclaim the Gospel to the people in the nave.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com      
(back) Subject: RE: Walking Music From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 13:00:44 -0400   Malcolm Wechsler writes:   > Indeed, the Gradual, sung as the priest descended the steps (gradus/gradua) to proclaim the Gospel to the people in the nave.   That may be the contemporary usage, but I don't think that the Gospel procession has such an ancient lineage. Doesn't it date only from the = 19th or even the 20th century?   Prior to that revision (which is still not universally followed), the = Gospel was read from the north side of the altar, or even facing north, = reflective of the the thrust of missionary effort at whatever time in early Christian history the custom originated.   Despite my unwashed medievalism in most liturgical matters, I do think = that the gospel procession into the nave is a very good idea. After doing this during the time of our great rector Fr. Laister (may his soul rest in peace), S. Clement's have reverted to singing the Holy Gospel against the north wall in the older style. This is now rather obnoxious, as though saying that the people actually present in the nave don't matter.   My understanding is that the gradual is so called because, the most difficult and elaborate chant in the mass, it involved a small group of singers, or even a soloist, who stood at the steps to sing it.   I could be mistaken... Bud would know, I'm sure.   Paul    
(back) Subject: looking for sheet music From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 13:12:06 -0500   Before anyone comments the appropriateness of it: a) I would probably agree with you b) I don't set that policy at my church I need a quick copy of the music to "From This Moment" - commonly performed by Shania Twain, I believe I have a wedding this weekend that is using it as a Recessional (I heard that...) and I have ordered it, but am concerned that it might not come in in time.   Does anyone happen to have a copy they could fax to me just in case?   Thanks, Margo    
(back) Subject: Gospel processions From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 11:12:56 -0700       "Emmons, Paul" wrote: > > Malcolm Wechsler writes: > > > Indeed, the Gradual, sung as the priest descended the steps > (gradus/gradua) to proclaim the Gospel to the people in the nave.   "Gradus" refers to the step from which the chanters sang the verses. It didn't, as far as I know, have anything to do with the movements of the celebrant. In Solemn Masses, in any case, the DEACON, rather than the celebrant, would have been doing the moving. The celebrant stayed at the altar on the Gospel horn, at least in the Tridentine / Anglican Solemn Mass.   > > That may be the contemporary usage, but I don't think that the Gospel > procession has such an ancient lineage. Doesn't it date only from the = 19th > or even the 20th century? > > Prior to that revision (which is still not universally followed), the = Gospel > was read from the north side of the altar, or even facing north, = reflective > of the the thrust of missionary effort at whatever time in early = Christian > history the custom originated.   Usages varied; the Sarum Rite was among the most complex ... the deacon, accompanied by subdeacons-of-honour, torches and incense, climbed the steps to the rood-loft and proclaimed the Gospel from THERE, which makes sense if you look at churches like Westminster Abbey, where the rood-loft is two or three bays deep, and the pulpitum screen is solid. In such churches, the people could see and hear very little of what went on at the distant High Altar. High atop the pulpitum screen, the deacon could be both seen AND heard.   So there would have been PLENTY of time to sing the Gregorian melodies of Gradual/Alleluia/Tract etc. > > Despite my unwashed medievalism in most liturgical matters, I do think = that > the gospel procession into the nave is a very good idea. After doing = this > during the time of our great rector Fr. Laister (may his soul rest in > peace), S. Clement's have reverted to singing the Holy Gospel against = the > north wall in the older style. This is now rather obnoxious, as though > saying that the people actually present in the nave don't matter.   The principle, of course, is proclaiming the Gospel to the "heathen north" (grin). I'm surprised that they do it at SOLEMN Masses, though. It was done at Sung Masses without assistant ministers, and Low Masses for the practical reason that the Missal was too heavy to HOLD for long Gospels. At Solemn Masses, the lighter Gospel Book would have been used. That's the way WE do it, but we have a Gospel procession at EVERY Mass, high, medium AND low (grin).   > > My understanding is that the gradual is so called because, the most > difficult and elaborate chant in the mass, it involved a small group of > singers, or even a soloist, who stood at the steps to sing it. > > I could be mistaken... Bud would know, I'm sure. > > Paul >   My take is that there WERE various processions to various places for the proclamation of the Gospel; following the Council of Trent, they were abrogated and/or died out of their own accord; there are no directions in the 1928 American Prayer Book as to WHERE or HOW the Gospel is to be proclaimed. In my home parish, the priest put the Gospel book on the Gospel side and picked it up to read the Gospel facing the people at Low Masses.   One of the high points of our Easter Vigil WAS the proclamation of the Gospel in the midst of the people, the deacon being surrounded with torches and lighted candles and great CLOUDS of incense.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: looking for sheet music From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 14:32:26 -0500   I thought Cole Porter wrote that....     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu             on 4/22/03 1:12 PM, Margo Dillard at dillardm@airmail.net wrote:   > Before anyone comments the appropriateness of it: > a) I would probably agree with you > b) I don't set that policy at my church > I need a quick copy of the music to "From This Moment" - commonly > performed by Shania Twain, I believe > I have a wedding this weekend that is using it as a Recessional (I > heard that...) > and I have ordered it, but am concerned that it might not come in in = time. > > Does anyone happen to have a copy they could fax to me just in case? > > Thanks, > Margo > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Becker-Ferris-Widor "Alleluia" From: <lindr@cch.com> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2003 13:48:16 -0500           I remember a phone conversation with Bill Ferris a good dozen years ago or so in which we were lamenting and chortling over a certain person at OUP (New York) we both had dealt/were dealing with in getting some of our choral works published. He mentioned a Widor toccata cum choral alleluias that he had done, so I just visited their website and found and item "Ferris (after Widor) Festival Alleluias - Mixed Chorus Part" and an ISBN number. I don't remember his mentioning his old teacher Arthur Becker in connection with it, but perhaps he did. I don't know if this shred of information is helpful or if it adds bountifully to the confusion I sense to be everywhere present. Is this a manifestation of the post-Church-Hell-Week blahs or something? I'm sleep-deprived like crazy = but had to get up, fully awake, at 2 AM and start composing before going to work today.   Bob Lind     Arthur C.Becker did his arrangement somewhere around 1938 and he also had Brass parts for use with it for big occasions at the University Church of St. Vincent DePaul, where he was organist for 57 years. The only brass parts of his original arrangement that exist today, as far as I know, are the parts for Trombones I, II and III. Bill "recreated" the missing brass parts.   David