PipeChat Digest #3628 - Saturday, April 26, 2003
 
Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries
  by "Jim C" <cromornecipher@hotmail.com>
Re: Fw:      Lampert must go
  by "Antoni Scott" <ascott@ptd.net>
Test
  by "Antoni Scott" <ascott@ptd.net>
Re: SARs in Toronto. Disinfecting pipes.
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
RE: SARs in Toronto. Disinfecting pipes.
  by "Sam Vause" <vause@cox.net>
Andrew Henderson - St. Ignatius, NY 4-11-03
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: Andrew Henderson - St. Ignatius, NY 4-11-03
  by "andrew meagher" <ameagher@stny.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2003 19:54:52 -0400   On 4/25/03 2:46 PM, "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> wrote:   > At St. Andrew's, the choir and organ are in the chancel. The choir > commune immediately after the sanctuary crowd (priest(s), layreaders, > servers).   Russ, I hear ya, exactly, I think. Very familiar procedure. I don't have = a "fix" on where you are, but I'm probably safe in thinking your rite is an Anglican one. I'm a Lutheran. In the 16th century, even Archbishop = Cranmer himself (and his crew) went to Germany to find out from the Lutherans "how to do it." But then in the 19th and 20th centuries, we'd forgotten (under influence of Rationalism and Pietism) how to do it, so we went back to Canterbury to find out all over again (thank goodness the English took NOTES). Result is that by now, we're pretty close to a solid common understanding. I think. I hope.   > The choir once "done" rise as a group;   After the chancelfolk, but before the congregation, right?   > I leave the organ and join my wife at the rail, last of the > chancel folk and first of the congregation. The rest of the > congregation follow, regulated by servers in the centre aisle.   OK; but any reason you and wife don't join the choir (in communing)? Our organist's wife is playing in another parish, so he and his two eldest (kidlet) sons commune with us (with the choir), while she communes with = the choir at her OWN parish (the two youngest are not yet communicants).   > At some point, the Sunday School children and > teachers arrive from the parish hall and commune as a group. It all > works very smoothly actually.   Oh, boy! Here we come to a serious parting of the ways. They are a "separate congregation"? They're part of THIS congregation, but = participate in its eucharist only by marching in, munching, sipping, and marching out? There's something VERY liturgically BAD [RARE word] about what I think you describing. Surely NO ("enn-oh") liturgical theologian (Roman, Anglican, Lutheran, whatever) would put up with what I think you are describing. (I try to use all-caps sparingly.)   It reminds me of when I was in the military: We'd be marched, naked, into = a gymnasium, and stuck in each cheek and maybe elsewhere, with a needle or = two or three. And marched out again to a place where we'd reclaim our jockeys and go on to whatever was next. Efficacy of injection was not in the = least dependent on what we were wearing, or whether we'd been there for the filling of the syringes with the appropriate juices. > > We sing a congregational offertory hymn, typically one beloved by the > congregation.   Wait a sec. You don't mean [offertory] AFTER communion do you? Maybe = I've got the whole thing backward here. On the other hand, if you DO mean = that, it is NOT my place to criticize or take exception. Feel free to kick my butt OUT of this conversation. (Seriously.)   > Its length is what it is. I assess the progress of the > ushers taking up the money and if it is looking like the hymn is too > short, I insert improvisations between verses to adjust the length so > that I end just before the priest raises the plates up before the > altar, signalling the start of the Doxology.   (Three cheers. You're making totally solid sense, assuming the "Doxology" thing, which I know many congregations do.) > > The improvs have been a mixed blessing. Some of the ushers, when > finished collecting the money, wait at the back until the hymn is over, > forcing an improv at the end of the hymn to bridge into the doxology. > Other ushers rush to the front immediately, ensuring that I do not have > to play an improv. Perhaps a message!   I'm familiar with that, Russ. Part of MY job (from the back pew) is to = give the ushers their cues. It takes someone to translate from "music" to "march" and do it with SOME sensitivity, and awareness of "time" = expections.   Alan (realizing we're BARELY on topic, if at all, but thankful to the = owners for letting us work on this bit or so)      
(back) Subject: Re: communing organists and offertory voluntaries From: "Jim C" <cromornecipher@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2003 22:01:29 -0400   At the church where I am currently serving (Lutheran [ELCA]) we sing 2 communion hymns and if I need to fill time after that (95% of the time), I =   usually improvise/doodle. The organ is in the back of the sanctuary, so what usually happens is after the congregation members have all had their turns, the worship assistant brings the elements back to me while I'm = still playing. I end what I'm doing and take communion and then spend the rest = of the time organizing for the close of service (post-communion canticle, closing hymn, postlude). Since the congregation refuses to sing during communion and the worship committee refuses to change the service, it's = not the most ideal use of time - but it works pretty well for me.   Best, Jim Clouser   _________________________________________________________________ STOP MORE SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE* http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/junkmail    
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Lampert must go From: "Antoni Scott" <ascott@ptd.net> Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2003 22:07:24 -0400   Dave: I don't remember which list it was on. I thought I just sent a response to Piporg-L. Anyway I didn't think I was able to post any messages to = PipeChat. Am I able to do that now?   Antoni ----- Original Message ----- From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Cc: <admin@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2003 8:54 PM Subject: Re: Fw: Lampert must go     > Tony > > WHY, Oh WHY did you feel that you had to send this to the PipeChat > list when it only refers to the PIPORG-L list?? You have done this > before but in this case the people on PipeChat who aren't on PIPORG-L > will have absolutely no idea of what all of this refers to. This is > an example of bad cross-posting at its worse! Please refrain from > doing it again. > > David > > -- > **************************************** > David Scribner > Owner / Co-Administrator > PipeChat > > http://www.pipechat.org > mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Test From: "Antoni Scott" <ascott@ptd.net> Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2003 22:09:19 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0036_01C30B77.5166A100 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Test:       ------=3D_NextPart_000_0036_01C30B77.5166A100 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2600.0" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Test:</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0036_01C30B77.5166A100--    
(back) Subject: Re: SARs in Toronto. Disinfecting pipes. From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2003 23:26:51 EDT   In a message dated 03-04-25 11:14:45 EDT, you write:   << I take care of about 20 pipe organs in the city of Toronto. Does anyone =   have information they can share about disinfecting organ pipes after the SARs epidemic in Toronto ends? >>   With all due respect, if you think you will need to disinfect organ pipes after the "epidemic", either you are not really paying attention to what = is being reported in the news, or, you are in the wrong business. How many people even get close enough the the pipes that they might leave any infectuous agents in them?   Richard  
(back) Subject: RE: SARs in Toronto. Disinfecting pipes. From: "Sam Vause" <vause@cox.net> Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2003 20:42:26 -0700   Okay, that did it -- I now have Diet Coke dripping down my monitor!!! --Sam Sam Vause, Chandler, AZ   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of TubaMagna@aol.com Sent: Friday, April 25, 2003 1:58 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: SARs in Toronto. Disinfecting pipes.   Disinfection is NOT necessary, HOWEVER:   Do not have intimate relations with any pipes, especially the reeds. Do not eat food that has been touched by the pipes. Do not share your toothbrush with any organ pipes. If your Rohrschalmei sneezes on you, or your Diaphone has a fever over 104 degrees, contact a physician.  
(back) Subject: Andrew Henderson - St. Ignatius, NY 4-11-03 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 2003 00:45:14 -0400   Andrew Henderson - St. Ignatius Loyola, New York - Friday, 11 April, 2003   This recital is presented as partial fulfillment for the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree. Andrew Henderson is a recipient of a C. V. Starr Foundation Doctoral Fellowship. Mr. Henderson is a student of Dr John Weaver.   I have quoted the above from the printed program for this recital, which = was an official program of The Juilliard School of Music. I should add that it surely cannot be very long now before we can change Mr. Henderson to Dr. Henderson! Andrew is Assistant Organist at St. Ignatius Loyola, and so was able to play his recital "at home." It is best not to consider the alternative!   When I was a student, Hindemith was very much alive, and his music was = heard regularly. I recall taking part in two performances of a grand piece = called Apparebit Repentina Dies, for choir and brass, once, as a member of The Juilliard Chorus, and the second time at Church of the Ascension, with Vernon deTar. Vernon had borrowed some of us students from the chorus who already knew the work. At Oberlin, I had once accompanied on the Piano a Sonata for Bassoon. On one great occasion, I went to Town Hall in New York to hear a concert of Bruckner and Hindemith, conducted by Hindemith = himself. And, more to the point of all this, the Organ Sonatas were played fairly regularly. By the end of the 60s, I was tired of them, and I think lots of other people were as well, because they were really not seen on recital programs anymore. Part of it, I guess, was a snob thing - who wanted to = play music that often ended with major triads? The rest perhaps had to do with people just being tired of this neo-Classical music, ditching it in favor = of more mystical works like those of Messiaen. And, of course, we cannot discount the impact of years of dull, pedantic performances of these = works.   My friends, you've heard it here! All the above has lost its validity. Andrew Henderson has just brought the Hindemith Organ Sonatas back to life = - completely. Sonata 1, with which the program began, is really about = gesture. One can say phrase, period, motif, whatever, but it is something more, and it wants a certain swagger, with registrations to match. I was really = hooked on this performance from the very first three bars, which makes up the = first gesture, at least in my mind. The whole movement was writ large, and with really clever use of the Organ. I thought Sehr Langsam wanted a bit more langsam - it seemed a bit rushed, but it is probably just my reaction to = the fact that it was a bit faster than I play it. Like the Holy Rollers, I really wanted to get out into the aisle and dance during the phantasie, so supercharged was it. It was wonderfully exciting. <Ruhig bewegt> almost seems like a contradiction, but the music tells you what to do, and if you get the point, there can be a sort of restful striding. It was wonderfully done right to the gentle ending, which gentleness did not deter a quite large audience from applauding loudly and long. I think it was a stunning gift, bringing this somewhat neglected masterpiece very much to life for = us.   New to me is the music of Michael Radulescu, a Romanian composer born in 1943, and now living and teaching in Vienna. I know his name because he = has been a very active recitalist in Quebec, and it is that fact, and his familiarity with the Organists of Quebec, that caused him to write = Ricercari and dedicate it to Monique Gendron who gave its premiere performance in Montreal in 1985. We heard the second and third pieces from the three that form this work. II. Versus. We learn from Andrew's excellent and extensive notes that like Messiaen, Radulescu creates his own scales, which in this case, apply to = the entire work. While these are working themselves out, we hear drones, beginning with just a few, and gradually building up, and then dropping = back to just one drone, sounding until the other music is done. This is a wonderful piece, although at the sounding of the first drone, every Organbuilder in the place immediately tensed up! III. Estampie - I thought I heard some "drone work" in this wonderful rhythmic (as the name suggests) piece as well, but I was not quite sure.   The piece we missed, the first, called Organa, presumably deals with the Medieval Organum, in parallel fourths and/or fifths, particularly given = the composer's interest in things Medieval. I will hope for another chance to hear Ricercari, all of it this time, and more of Radulescu's music. = Tonight' s introduction was much appreciated.   Intermission   I have no doubt that many who were at tonight's recital by Andrew = Henderson were at least at some of Olivier Latry's six Messian recitals at St. Ignatius, which included the complete works. Some of the very late works were unknown to me, and the buzz was that they were ever so long, and not accessible to mere humans. I attended the six recitals, and was riveted = from the very first note to the last. The performer, his performance, and Organ all worked together, and the church's generous acoustic did not hurt one bit - that was the sound and type of space for which Messiaen was writing. In any case, while loving the late works, one had a sense of comfort in hearing the very familiar older works, one of which was The Ascension. Andrew's performance of the complete Ascension was reminiscent of that = great series, and it was a total joy to hear it so wonderfully played. The <Majeste du Christ> was truly grand, with enormous, wonderful Crescendi. <Alleluia sereins> was beautiful and peaceful. The <Transports de joie> rather took right off; outbursts with En Chamades blazing. <Priere du Christ> finishes our tonal journey from E Major to G Major, giving us a sense of completion and finality. Sorry about the missing diacriticals. = They really can mess up Internet postings. Thanks to Andrew for such a lovely experience.   This program of all 20th century music ended wonderfully with a powerful performance of the famous Moto Ostinato from "Sunday Music" of Petr Eben.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com        
(back) Subject: RE: Andrew Henderson - St. Ignatius, NY 4-11-03 From: "andrew meagher" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 2003 01:16:41 -0400   Malcom,   I love the Hindemith organ sonatas. I haven't played them yet but would definitely like to. I played Hindemiths piano sonata #1 in undergrad. I spent about twice as long memorizing the piece as I did learning it! I = also sung aparebit repetinae dies in college. It's a great piece but it incredibly difficult and one of the most difficult choral pieces I have = ever sung. I also sang Hindemith's six chansons. These are challenging but not as hard as aparebit. It's too bad that more people don't take up the challenge of Hindemith's choral music. I once tried to find a recording = of aparebit and couldn't. I guess no one wants to take on the challenge. If you know of any recording of aparebit please let me know. Or if anyone on this chat list does please do tell me, I have wanted a recording of it = ever since I sung and have yet to find it. regards,   Andrew Meagher   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Malcolm Wechsler Sent: Saturday, April 26, 2003 12:45 AM To: Pipe Chat; Pipe Organ List Subject: Andrew Henderson - St. Ignatius, NY 4-11-03     Andrew Henderson - St. Ignatius Loyola, New York - Friday, 11 April, 2003   This recital is presented as partial fulfillment for the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree. Andrew Henderson is a recipient of a C. V. Starr Foundation Doctoral Fellowship. Mr. Henderson is a student of Dr John Weaver.   I have quoted the above from the printed program for this recital, which = was an official program of The Juilliard School of Music. I should add that it surely cannot be very long now before we can change Mr. Henderson to Dr. Henderson! Andrew is Assistant Organist at St. Ignatius Loyola, and so was able to play his recital "at home." It is best not to consider the alternative!   When I was a student, Hindemith was very much alive, and his music was = heard regularly. I recall taking part in two performances of a grand piece = called Apparebit Repentina Dies, for choir and brass, once, as a member of The Juilliard Chorus, and the second time at Church of the Ascension, with Vernon deTar. Vernon had borrowed some of us students from the chorus who already knew the work. At Oberlin, I had once accompanied on the Piano a Sonata for Bassoon. On one great occasion, I went to Town Hall in New York to hear a concert of Bruckner and Hindemith, conducted by Hindemith = himself. And, more to the point of all this, the Organ Sonatas were played fairly regularly. By the end of the 60s, I was tired of them, and I think lots of other people were as well, because they were really not seen on recital programs anymore. Part of it, I guess, was a snob thing - who wanted to = play music that often ended with major triads? The rest perhaps had to do with people just being tired of this neo-Classical music, ditching it in favor = of more mystical works like those of Messiaen. And, of course, we cannot discount the impact of years of dull, pedantic performances of these = works.   My friends, you've heard it here! All the above has lost its validity. Andrew Henderson has just brought the Hindemith Organ Sonatas back to life = - completely. Sonata 1, with which the program began, is really about = gesture. One can say phrase, period, motif, whatever, but it is something more, and it wants a certain swagger, with registrations to match. I was really = hooked on this performance from the very first three bars, which makes up the = first gesture, at least in my mind. The whole movement was writ large, and with really clever use of the Organ. I thought Sehr Langsam wanted a bit more langsam - it seemed a bit rushed, but it is probably just my reaction to = the fact that it was a bit faster than I play it. Like the Holy Rollers, I really wanted to get out into the aisle and dance during the phantasie, so supercharged was it. It was wonderfully exciting. <Ruhig bewegt> almost seems like a contradiction, but the music tells you what to do, and if you get the point, there can be a sort of restful striding. It was wonderfully done right to the gentle ending, which gentleness did not deter a quite large audience from applauding loudly and long. I think it was a stunning gift, bringing this somewhat neglected masterpiece very much to life for = us.   New to me is the music of Michael Radulescu, a Romanian composer born in 1943, and now living and teaching in Vienna. I know his name because he = has been a very active recitalist in Quebec, and it is that fact, and his familiarity with the Organists of Quebec, that caused him to write = Ricercari and dedicate it to Monique Gendron who gave its premiere performance in Montreal in 1985. We heard the second and third pieces from the three that form this work. II. Versus. We learn from Andrew's excellent and extensive notes that like Messiaen, Radulescu creates his own scales, which in this case, apply to = the entire work. While these are working themselves out, we hear drones, beginning with just a few, and gradually building up, and then dropping = back to just one drone, sounding until the other music is done. This is a wonderful piece, although at the sounding of the first drone, every Organbuilder in the place immediately tensed up! III. Estampie - I thought I heard some "drone work" in this wonderful rhythmic (as the name suggests) piece as well, but I was not quite sure.   The piece we missed, the first, called Organa, presumably deals with the Medieval Organum, in parallel fourths and/or fifths, particularly given = the composer's interest in things Medieval. I will hope for another chance to hear Ricercari, all of it this time, and more of Radulescu's music. = Tonight' s introduction was much appreciated.   Intermission   I have no doubt that many who were at tonight's recital by Andrew = Henderson were at least at some of Olivier Latry's six Messian recitals at St. Ignatius, which included the complete works. Some of the very late works were unknown to me, and the buzz was that they were ever so long, and not accessible to mere humans. I attended the six recitals, and was riveted = from the very first note to the last. The performer, his performance, and Organ all worked together, and the church's generous acoustic did not hurt one bit - that was the sound and type of space for which Messiaen was writing. In any case, while loving the late works, one had a sense of comfort in hearing the very familiar older works, one of which was The Ascension. Andrew's performance of the complete Ascension was reminiscent of that = great series, and it was a total joy to hear it so wonderfully played. The <Majeste du Christ> was truly grand, with enormous, wonderful Crescendi. <Alleluia sereins> was beautiful and peaceful. The <Transports de joie> rather took right off; outbursts with En Chamades blazing. <Priere du Christ> finishes our tonal journey from E Major to G Major, giving us a sense of completion and finality. Sorry about the missing diacriticals. = They really can mess up Internet postings. Thanks to Andrew for such a lovely experience.   This program of all 20th century music ended wonderfully with a powerful performance of the famous Moto Ostinato from "Sunday Music" of Petr Eben.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org