PipeChat Digest #3635 - Monday, April 28, 2003
 
Re: Clouds of smoke
  by "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Festive Anniversary - St. Ignatius Loyola, NY
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: children in church
  by "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net>
NYC  3-29 to 4-4
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: RE: Self Tremming Regulator
  by "danielwh" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Carpal Tunnel Help Needed
  by <jjarvis@attbi.com>
RE: Clouds of smoke
  by "andrew meagher" <ameagher@stny.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Clouds of smoke From: "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 2003 11:56:11 -0400   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ----__JNP_000_74c0.4aef.1669 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit       On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 11:17:06 EDT Cremona502@cs.com writes:   > Actually, the first thing that needs to be replaced is the technician/company that has been (supposedly) working on the organ. They >are not doing a thorough job. I wouldn't trust them as far as I could blow all that smoke.         PLEASE, NEVER accuse the technician for something that is wrong with the organ. If you absolutely MUST change technicians, do so only if he is unable to fix the problem. If the technician cannot diagnose a particular problem it does not mean he is incompetent. Noone can possibly know erverything. Good technicians frequently seek help   There are several things that may have caused the failure in the blower, almost none can be blamed on the technician. The only plausible negligence that you could blame the technician for, would be failure to lubricate the blower. And then, only if the bearing is not leaking oil.   Jim ----__JNP_000_74c0.4aef.1669 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3Dcontent-type = content=3D3Dtext/html;charset=3D3DUS-ASCII> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1170" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 11:17:06 EDT <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:Cremona502@cs.com">Cremona502@cs.com</A> writes:</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D3D2><FONT face=3D3D"Times = New =3D Roman"=3D20 size=3D3D3>&gt;</FONT>&nbsp;Actually, the first thing that needs to be =3D replaced is=3D20 the technician/company that has been (supposedly) working on the = organ.=3D20 &nbsp;&nbsp;They &gt;are not doing a thorough job. &nbsp;&nbsp;I wouldn't = =3D trust=3D20 them as far as I could blow all that smoke.</FONT></FONT></DIV> <DIV><BR><BR><BR><BR>PLEASE,&nbsp;NEVER accuse the technician for = something=3D that=3D20 is wrong with the organ.&nbsp; If you absolutely MUST change technicians, = =3D do so=3D20 only&nbsp;if he is unable to fix the problem. If the technician cannot =3D diagnose=3D20 a particular problem it does not mean he is incompetent.&nbsp;=3D20 Noone&nbsp;&nbsp;can possibly know erverything.&nbsp; Good = technicians=3D20 frequently seek help</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>There are several things that may have caused the failure in the =3D blower,=3D20 almost none can be blamed on the technician. The only=3D20 plausible&nbsp;negligence&nbsp;&nbsp;that you could blame the technician = =3D for,=3D20 would be failure to lubricate the blower.&nbsp; And then, only if the =3D bearing is=3D20 not leaking oil.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Jim<BR></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ----__JNP_000_74c0.4aef.1669--    
(back) Subject: Festive Anniversary - St. Ignatius Loyola, NY From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 2003 12:17:21 -0400   St. Ignatius, Festive Anniversary - Four Live Organists!   Dear Ones,   I knew this would be special, so special that I even found my necktie, and managed to recall how to make the knot. (Now I am ready for Lee and = Keith's wedding!)   What a team! Put together four Organists who maintain themselves in top playing shape, give them a leader of imagination and energy, bearing in = mind that they all have imagination and energy themselves, and add to that a powerful knowledge of the repertoire, a lot of personal good will, and the chance to meet together to bounce ideas around, and what happened last = night becomes possible, even probable. Give them an instrument to love, which becomes the palette upon which they lavish their gifts, a perfect environment for that instrument, and, always ready for the game, a devoted cadre of hundreds of supportive fans, and there really is no limit to what can happen.   Yesterday afternoon, the people who are responsible for Sacred Music in a Sacred Space at St. Ignatius Loyola in Manhattan celebrated ten years of = the Mander Organ in that space, and how better to do that than with a concert = of Organ music? We heard each of the four Organists of the church, singly, = and sometimes in surprising combinations. The happy, anticipatory buzz of a large crowd was interrupted by the sound of the <en chamade> reeds and plenty more, as Kent Tritle, Director of Music Ministries, brought back memories, at least to me, in playing "The Emporer's Fanfare," a Biggs arrangement of a Soler piece that many of us of a certain age will = remember from a Biggs LP. The buzz turned quickly into a great hush, and then delighted applause as the piece died away. What a great way to begin the evening. Ready at the lectern then was Fr. Walter Modrys, S. J., an = Organist 's dream pastor, who spoke briefly about the how the parish came to have this Organ, a lovely story I enjoyed hearing again. Then, John Mander, who had flown from London for the occasion, gave a very personal and touching account of his feelings about taking on this enormous project, of a magnitude not heretofore known by him and by the company. He spoke of four people of the many who had given of their gifts: Didier Grassin, who designed the case; Stephen Bicknell, who, using a CAD program, designed = the details of the structure; Les Ross, who supervised the construction, and then the installation on site; and Michael Blighton, who assisted John Mander throughout the voicing and tonal finishing in the building. He also spoke of often remembering the wisdom of his mentor for six hears, Rudolph von Beckerath, during the intracies of the design and construction of the Organ. There was a kind of sound of assent that indicated that the = audience was in tune with John's comment about the marvel of having had a teacher = who was still teaching him, seven years after his death!   It was then time for more music, and I looked at the program and wondered: The Chorale-Menuet from Suite Gothique of Leon Boellmann with TWO = Organists! Was it originally intended for Grande Orgue and Orgue de Choeur in alternation? Well, no, but Kent and Scott Warren, Associate Musician at = St. Ignatius, had decided to do it that way, using the surprisingly effective little Klopp continuo Organ that usually lives down in the front of the church. The two players were bridging an enormous distance, but did not = use closed circuit TV, but simply practiced enough to ascertain the effect of the delays both ways, and they got it absolutely right all the way. Great fun!   Then Kent gave us a welcome, solid chunk of Bach, the G Minor Fantasy and Fugue. He began with an unfamiliar but apt introduction of about twenty bars, and then, on a fuller registration, began the familiar opening notes of the work. It was fine playing, perfectly articulate for the acoustic, = and the Fugue bounded along happily. Convinced that Kent had somewhere found a long lost manuscript of Bach's introduction the piece, my query produced = the response: "Wrong memory!" This goes into the Pantheon of the Great Finesse!   Before relinquishing the bench to others on the team, to demonstrate the Organ's affinity to French Classical repertoire, Kent played the Tierce en taille from the Couperin Mass for Convents, using the lovely Cornet. As he prepared to leave the Organ, he patted the bench, as one would a favorite animal, and then did the same to the key cheek of the lowest manual. There were broad smiles everywhere, amidst the applause.   Scott Warren is the newest member of the St. Ignatius Organ Quartet. He is music director at Immanuel Lutheran Church a few blocks from St. Ignatius, where he helps with some weekday liturgies, and also with the Sunday = evening Mass, largely attended by university students. The style of that service = is what, I think, is often referred to as "blended." Those who attend are not allowed to forget that there is a Pipe Organ in the building! I had never heard him in a solo Organ performance, and his playing on this occasion = was an excellent opportunity. He played the, to me, tremendously moving Franck Fantasie in A, with great poise and an understanding of the powerful = musical tensions and releases of this complex and beautiful work, and it was glorious to hear. Some time ago, Scott played a self-introductory solo recital in the Organ Recital Series, and I regretted having been forced to miss it, and now do so all the more.   Sometimes in real life, the right people end up in the right place with = the right people, and so it came to pass that somehow, Nancianne Parrella = found her way to St. Ignatius Loyola as Associate Organist - I have forgotten = how it all happened, but some years ago, it just did. The church and all of us who love the place and the music that comes out of it with shocking regularly, rejoice greatly and regularly about her presence, as we have = done more recently with Andrew Henderson, and just now, with Scott Warren. With Easter still on our minds and with our fundament-al calluses to prove it, Nancianne delivered herself of a really exciting performance of the Tournemire <Victimae Paschali> improvisation, as realized from a recording by Durufle. This Organ, this acoustic, this music, and this player just coalesced into a transcendent experience, yet another mountain top in this night of nights.   From L'Ascension, <Alleluias sereins> and <Transports de joie>, Messian. = The St. Ignatius Organ is as much a Messiaen Organ as it is an instrument for the works of many other composers. With Olivier Latry having anointed it, = a while back, as being an Organ in America worthy of his six concert = complete Messiaen series, played also at St. Paul's Cathedral in London and at home (with a recording) at Notre Dame de Paris, I always feel a special excitement about hearing his music in this place. Andrew Henderson played the two pieces mentioned above in his Doctoral recital here a bit over two weeks ago, and he did them again on this day. If he does them next week again, I would still want to hear them. Andrew's recital had drawn a quite large crowd, including many people who are allied with him perhaps at Juilliard, or certainly through his work at the church, along with those = who love the Organ here and come to most recitals. Today's crowd was a great = mix of those who love the church and Organ, and all the musicians involved, = and for whom it was no doubt something good added to the lively mix of this program, for them to hear Messiaen so convincingly played.   I haven't mentioned today the large projection TV screen bringing the = image of the work going on at the console down to the audience. I think it was = at its best in the next and final piece on the program. Andrew and Nancianne played a truly wild set of Variations for Organ four hands and various numbers of feet, on the Easter Theme "O Filii et Filiae," by John Rutter. Well, you had to see it to believe it. It was an amazing display of dexterity, and just plain fun, with variations in many and various styles including one quite bluesy number. It more-or-less brought down the house, and it brought a concert filled with excitement and good cheer to a = smashing close.   In the last couple of years, after each Organ recital, an Organ tour to = the balcony has been offered, and that has become ever more popular. There = must have been about fifty people that ascended the stairs for Andrew = Henderson's talk and demonstation of the instrument. He does it very well, and people ask lots of intelligent questions, and really do enjoy it. Last night, eventually, all four Organists ended up in the balcony, and lots of autographs were signed.   I want to compliment Music Administrator Christine Hoffman, who put the = very comprehensive and handsome program together, and also, Cleveland Kersh who after poring over archives about the history of the Organ, produced a terrific set of program notes, as he has done before in this place. Interspersed throughout those notes were reduced copies of some of the really interesting CAD drawings for the Organ.   And as the sun sinks slowly in the west, we come to the end of yet another completely memorable experience at St. Ignatius Loyola, on Park Avenue, in Manhattan. I hope these notes might help you to share the experience.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com        
(back) Subject: Re: children in church From: "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 2003 09:22:20 -0700 (PDT)   Being in a suburbia church, we have just such a thing, glassed in cry room w/ the service piped in. Not many were using it, now have a standard note in the bulletin "IF YOUR CHILD NEEDS A TIME OUT..." Has helped a bit. But when you've got 50+ kids under the age of 10 at our late service, it can be a bit noisy.   I was NEVER allowed to be noisy during church. All it took was 'that look' from mom when she was at the organ, that look that if I didn't quiet down then and there I was going to be in deep trouble as soon as she could get off the bench. If I wanted to convey any thing to mom during church I WROTE it down usually or whispered it. I recall even at age 3-4 I sat in the pew next to mom and paid as much attention as I could. My earliest memories of church are around that age being able to sing the refrain from "This is the Feast." I've noticed a huge change in the way children are allowed to behave in church, and that being in a farily short period of time, as I'm 25. I think people in our congregation are trying harder to keep things under control due to the fast growth and services are fuller now and the sound of the small children seems to multiply when we are full, but as of late, things seem to be improving.   Trav     --- Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote: > On 4/28/03 12:11 PM, "Randolph Runyon" > <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote: > > > So, are those wailing tots supposed to be in the > pews instead of > > the nursery? And is the wailing wall a far from > universal practice? > > About 1948 my home congregation in Seattle built a > new church, seating 700. > Major new thing for us was a glassed-in "cry room." > Got lots of use. > > I think that in urban parishes the cry room is not > usual (but not > unheard-of); in suburban parishes (lotsa families > with lotsa kids) it's VERY > common. > > We don't have one at St. Luke's, but moms or dads > are known (on any given > Sunday) to stroll out to the narthex with the > wailing kid, until the kid > goes back to sleep. > > Alan > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: NYC 3-29 to 4-4 From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 2003 13:07:36 -0400   I'm going to be in NYC for a few days, as my fiance is having surgery at = the NYU Hospital for Special Surgery on 3/29.   Is there anything musically special going on? Anyone want to meet for = lunch or something? I'm going to be on my own for most of the time.   Victoria Hedberg-Ceruti  
(back) Subject: Re: RE: Self Tremming Regulator From: "danielwh" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 2003 14:27:10 -0300   Speaking of wind preassures and stuff How much wind can a 1hp blower which produces 6" static pressure comfortably blow # ranks at 3 1/2" water column I had the problem of adding another regulator I used a flex type = windline of 4 inches diameter a distance of around 8 feet , Problem I ran into was that my blower kept going back into its start up mode. Worked fine when I disconnected thsi regulater though. THe resevoir top is quite heavy. the dimensions were about 3 feet by two with a curtain valve. Would wind leaks cause this problem. I havent reconnected it but I did seal any leaks I found, the leaks I found I wouldnt think of as being substantial..the output by the way was the same size to a small offset = chest 1 rank though this rank works fine on the main resevoir. I would think that this blower would be more then sufficient to wind my organ of only 8 ranks. as it had been in a church previous that winded 15 ranks. ANy ideas?      
(back) Subject: Carpal Tunnel Help Needed From: <jjarvis@attbi.com> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 2003 17:32:03 +0000   The day that I have dreaded has finally arrived, I suspect that I have = Carpal Tunnel (sp?) of my left hand. The little finger and the left half of my = ring finger have been numb for several days. The use of a mouse for many hours = each day with my left-hand and hours of practicing have caught up with me. It hasn't seemed to affect my playing too much at this point.   Anyone have some good suggestions for carpal tunnel relief? JJ  
(back) Subject: RE: Clouds of smoke From: "andrew meagher" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 2003 13:40:27 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0015_01C30D8B.BB643E30 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   It sounds to me like you may need a new blower. Has the blower been replaced since the installation of the organ? That wouldn't suprise me if it needed one after a century. That is the worst possible scenario. The organ definitely does not need to be junked. -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of = Tom R. Sent: Sunday, April 27, 2003 11:03 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Clouds of smoke     Hello fellow listmembers,   I rarely ever post but today I must because I have a story to tell, and I need some info to go along with it. The organ at the church I play for on saturday evening, a late 10's/early 20's Austin, rebuilt by unknown company in the 70's, has been in the process of renovation for the last 6 months or so. Badly needed as well because when I started playing there = in december, half the notes were dead, there was a cypher in the swell that affected all swell registers, the swell pedal wasn't functioning, and = there were about 3 ranks that were non-functional(and out of 14, that makes a difference). The church was on stage 2 of a 4 stage restoration. Stage 1 was retrofitting the console with solid state technology. Stage 2 was reconnecting the trumpet ranks which have been disconnected for years. Stage 3 was to be a releathering of entire organ. And stage 4 would have been a cleaning of entire instrument, readjustment, voicing, and tuning. Today, however, marked what may prove to be the end of this instrument. = (And it was so close to being done :-( ) According to the substitute = organist, who played for 11:00am mass today and first communion, when the disaster occured, this is what happened. After communion at 11:00, the choir = noticed the smell of smoke on the choir loft. The organist was unable to smell it because there was a fan up there bowing the smell away from him. After mass, he looked into the chamber and he did notice a funny smell, but coundn't figure out where it was coming from. He returned to the church = for first communion at 2:00pm, and he noticed a clanking sound when he turned the organ on. Then he began to play his prelude and the entire swell went dead on him. (I don't know if this happened all at once, or gradually, he didn't specify.) He turned it off and back on again and it seemed to be working fine. However, when he was playing the gloria, the organ started = to go out of tune rapidly, and it sounded like it was losing air. The swell again went dead, and the great and pedal slowly went after that. He tried turning the organ off and on again, a couple of times, and then he smelled smoke and ran down to the basement where the blower was. When he got down there, the ENTIRE BASEMENT was filled with heavy white smoke. It was all coming from the blower room. Apparently, either there was an electrical problem, or the blower itself had a problem and overheated, pouring smoke out everywhere. He cut the main power to the church, in the middle of = first communion no less(lol), and left the power off for the rest of mass, for fear of electrical fire. Amidst this sad story, of how a nearly century = old pipe organ may be lost forever in a cloud of smoke, I have a few questions for any organ techs out there. Does anyone know whether or not it sounds like this could be repaired relatively cheaply? How much damage might the smoke have done to the inside of the organ, chests, and pipes? Has this happened to anyone before and, if so, was the organ junked because of = that? Does anyone know what might have caused this or what might account for the high temperatures and smoke? How much do blowers cost these days, new and used? This and any other info may be helpful, so please feel free to jump in on this topic. A real treasure of an organ is at stake.   Thanks everyone,   Tom Rishel Organist/Choir Director Ft. Burd Presbyterian Church Brownsville, PA Associate Organist St. Mary the Nativity RC Church Uniontown, PA   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0015_01C30D8B.BB643E30 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1">     <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1141" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D218583817-28042003><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D size=3D3D2>It=3D20 sounds to me like you may need a new blower.&nbsp; Has the blower been =3D replaced=3D20 since the installation of the organ?&nbsp; That wouldn't suprise me if =3D it needed=3D20 one after a century.&nbsp; That is the worst possible scenario.&nbsp; =3D The organ=3D20 definitely does not need to be junked.</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE dir=3D3Dltr style=3D3D"MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV class=3D3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3D3Dltr align=3D3Dleft><FONT =3D face=3D3DTahoma=3D20 size=3D3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> =3D pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]<B>On Behalf Of </B>Tom =3D R.<BR><B>Sent:</B>=3D20 Sunday, April 27, 2003 11:03 PM<BR><B>To:</B> =3D PipeChat<BR><B>Subject:</B>=3D20 Clouds of smoke<BR><BR></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Hello fellow =3D listmembers,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial = size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I rarely ever = post =3D but today I=3D20 must because I have a story to tell, and I need some info to go along = =3D with=3D20 it.&nbsp; The organ at the church I play for on saturday evening, a =3D late=3D20 10's/early 20's Austin, rebuilt by unknown company in the 70's, has =3D been in=3D20 the process of renovation for the last 6 months or so.&nbsp; Badly =3D needed as=3D20 well because when I started playing there in december, half the notes = =3D were=3D20 dead, there was a cypher in the swell that affected all swell =3D registers, the=3D20 swell pedal wasn't functioning, and there were about 3 ranks that were = =3D   non-functional(and out of 14, that makes a difference).&nbsp; The =3D church was=3D20 on stage 2 of a 4 stage restoration.&nbsp;Stage 1 was retrofitting the = =3D console=3D20 with solid state technology.&nbsp; Stage 2 was reconnecting the =3D trumpet ranks=3D20 which have been disconnected for years.&nbsp; Stage&nbsp;3 was to =3D be&nbsp;a=3D20 releathering of entire organ.&nbsp; And stage 4 would have been a =3D cleaning of=3D20 entire instrument, readjustment, voicing, and tuning.&nbsp; Today, =3D however,=3D20 marked what may prove to be the end of this instrument. (And it was so = =3D close=3D20 to being done :-(&nbsp; )&nbsp; According to the substitute organist, = =3D who=3D20 played for 11:00am mass today and first communion, when the disaster =3D occured,=3D20 this is what happened.&nbsp; After communion at 11:00, the choir =3D noticed the=3D20 smell of smoke on the choir loft.&nbsp; The organist was unable to =3D smell it=3D20 because there was a fan up there bowing the smell away from him.&nbsp; = =3D After=3D20 mass, he looked into the chamber and he did notice a funny smell, but = =3D coundn't=3D20 figure out where it was coming from.&nbsp; He returned to the church =3D for first=3D20 communion at 2:00pm, and he noticed a clanking sound when he turned =3D the organ=3D20 on.&nbsp; Then he began to play his prelude and the entire swell went = =3D dead on=3D20 him. (I don't know if this happened all at once, or gradually, he =3D didn't=3D20 specify.)&nbsp; He turned it off and back on again and it seemed to be = =3D working=3D20 fine.&nbsp; However, when he was playing the gloria, the organ started = =3D to go=3D20 out of tune rapidly, and it sounded like it was losing air.&nbsp; The = =3D swell=3D20 again went dead, and the great and pedal slowly went after that.&nbsp; = =3D He=3D20 tried turning the organ off and on again, a couple of times, and then =3D he=3D20 smelled smoke and ran down to the basement where the blower was.&nbsp; = =3D When he=3D20 got down there, the ENTIRE BASEMENT was filled with heavy white =3D smoke.&nbsp;=3D20 It was all coming from the blower room.&nbsp; Apparently, either there = =3D was an=3D20 electrical problem, or the blower itself had a problem and overheated, = =3D pouring=3D20 smoke out everywhere.&nbsp; He cut the main power to the church, in =3D the middle=3D20 of first communion no less(lol), and left the power off for the rest =3D of mass,=3D20 for fear of electrical fire.&nbsp; Amidst this sad story, of how a =3D nearly=3D20 century old pipe organ may be lost forever in a cloud of smoke, I have = =3D a=3D20 few&nbsp;questions for any organ techs out there.&nbsp; Does anyone =3D know=3D20 whether or not it sounds like this could be repaired relatively =3D cheaply?&nbsp;=3D20 How much damage might the smoke have done to the inside of the organ, = =3D chests,=3D20 and pipes?&nbsp; Has this happened to anyone before and, if so, was =3D the organ=3D20 junked because of that?&nbsp; Does anyone know what might have caused = =3D this or=3D20 what might account for the high temperatures and smoke?&nbsp; How much = =3D do=3D20 blowers cost these days, new and used?&nbsp; This and any other info =3D may be=3D20 helpful, so please feel free to jump in on this topic.&nbsp; A real =3D treasure=3D20 of an organ is at stake.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Thanks everyone,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Tom Rishel</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Organist/Choir = Director</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Ft. Burd Presbyterian =3D Church</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Brownsville, PA</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Associate Organist</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>St. Mary the Nativity RC =3D Church</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Uniontown,=3D20 PA</FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0015_01C30D8B.BB643E30--