PipeChat Digest #3844 - Saturday, August 2, 2003
 
A Sultry Day in New York
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Hey, ain't that called JAZZ?
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Peterson magnets
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ?
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ?
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ?
  by <Swedish5702@aol.com>
RE:  Organ chamber (was: Allen or Rodgers?)
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: What Jazz Is.
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Marion Ohio  Aug 30
  by "Tom Yannitell" <tyann@marion.net>
RE:  Organ chamber
  by "Kealypaul" <kealypaul@yahoo.com>
Re: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ?
  by "Jacob Bartle" <dreddnott@yahoo.com>
Re: Ideas?
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: A Sultry Day in New York From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 09:36:11 -0500   Re: A Sultry Day in New York   Here's a used copy for $2.50:   http://www.amres.com/catalogs/SMAB.asp   Found it using Google.   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower   -----Original Message----- Subject: Re: music but not organ music% From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2003 10:46:25 -0500   on 7/31/03 9:33 AM, Dr. Amy Fleming at docamy@alltel.net wrote:   > Hope someone can help me. I am looking for some piano sheet music by the > composer Alec Templeton. The piece is called a "A Sultry Day in New York". > My mom played it in her youth and would like to play it again. I was > hoping to find it for her 80th birthday but internet searches have been > unproductive, it is out of print. It may be in a 2 volume set of paino > music by this composer called "Piano Portraits". If anyone can help it > would be greatly appreciated. Thank you, > Amy Fleming        
(back) Subject: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ? From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 17:47:17 EDT   Greetings,   No apology necessary.   Sharing contrary thoughts without worry of reprisals is a hallmark of Pipechat chatterers. I appreciate your comments.   Musically, Stan Krider   In a message dated 08/01/2003 5:02:32 AM Eastern Daylight Time, you = recently wrote:   Not at all. While "feeling the music", etc, is important in jazz, it = does > not define jazz or differentiate it from other types of music. = "Feeling" > the music is as important in Bach or Buxtehude as it is in Bebop. And = as > for the previous writer's advice about not doing it all, that absolutely > applies to playing organ or harpsichord in a chamber group. You have to = be > aware of what the other instruments are covering and what they are not. = If > you don't tailor your continuo playing to the group, you are not doing = the > job. Jazz is a whole other wonderful world, but you can't define it = that > easily. I apologize if I am taking a lighthearted comment too seriously, > but I just couldn't let that slide by.    
(back) Subject: Peterson magnets From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 17:21:24 -0500   HI List, Thanks to all who responded with pictures and information about Peterson magnets. I really appreciate it. Gary      
(back) Subject: Re: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ? From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Fri, 01 Aug 2003 19:33:49 -0400   And I appreciate yours, Stan. While it is by no means universal, a lot of classically oriented people either have no concept at all of what jazz really is (they usually think that "Rhapsody in Blue" qualifies), or they cannot tolerate it and have no desire to ever try. As a classically trained professional musician who also plays and appreciates real jazz, I'm probably a little over-sensitive to the issue. Appreciation of music is a subjective and personal thing, and the older I get, the more convinced I am that almost all preferences are valid. If I live long enough, maybe I'll lose the word "almost". Why, the other day, I caught myself almost enjoying a song by [name withheld to avoid starting a flame war]! Certainly no offence taken or intended.   Cheers, Walter Greenwood   Wuxuzusu@aol.com wrote:   > Greetings, > > No apology necessary. > > Sharing contrary thoughts without worry of reprisals is a hallmark of > Pipechat chatterers. I appreciate your comments. > > Musically, > Stan Krider    
(back) Subject: Re: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ? From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 20:26:53 EDT   Imagine how simple life would be if there were only 2 kinds of music: = good and bad. I think that terms such as classical, baroque, jazz, pop, = etc...have been detrimental to the fine arts. Furthermore, who assigned all these idiotic names to the genres? Hollywood executives? Its nothing but = marketing...to rape and brainwash idle minded people and IMPRESSIONABLE youth. Music is music, its all physics. Food for thought. Just my 2 cents. gfc    
(back) Subject: Re: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ? From: <Swedish5702@aol.com> Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 20:50:35 EDT   Walter: I am enjoying your comments on Jazz. Until recently I was a VP of several = FM Jazz stations. Best, Craig    
(back) Subject: RE: Organ chamber (was: Allen or Rodgers?) From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 22:40:56 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve     > Have you ever stood in the pipe chamber while someone played a "real" pipe organ?   Yes, once I told my "console man" (who is usually an organist colleague) to play after a tuning job. Terrific. The best Stereo cannot achieve that effect. When he started to use the Trumpet and Clairon I had to go out swiftly, however.   Cheers Andres ================================ First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.          
(back) Subject: RE: What Jazz Is. From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 22:47:52 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Breaking list rules perhaps, I only can agree to that. I studied Jazz Harmony and piano technique for two years only to find out that I never = will become a George Gerschwin :)- At least I am capable to analize Jazz musically and communicate with my Jazz playing colleagues here. More on topic, I am all but an envious nature... except when I hear Art Tatum. = Wish I had *this* technique on the piano!! - would have saved me a lot of = trouble :) I never had enough patience to study the piano all day long, I confess.   Well, everybody has an own place in our lord's vineyard and I am happy at = my workbench (for that my long silence; was involved in a project and have = now 250+ mails to read! :)   Happy Weekend Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.   ----- Original Message ----- From: Gfc234@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2003 8:35 AM Subject: What Jazz Is.     It certainly is NOT JAZZ. Jazz involves intricate harmonizations, MELODIC AND HARMONIC IMPROVISATION, CREATIVITY, and SOULFULNESS. Re-arranging a junky hymn is not jazz, and it offends me that someone = would consider it jazz. It is tackier than someone calling the Bach D minor Toccata-Phantom of the Opera or some other idiotic movie. Playing a jazz standard involves a few things: Playing the melody of the tune once through-tunes are typically 12, 16, or 32 bars. After the melody or = "head" is played-the chord changes keep going, and everyone in the band = improvises over the chords until they are satisfied....the tune never stops until the head is played to signal the end of the tune. If you want to hear jazz organ, go out and buy 3 records to start-Larry Young: Unity- Jimmy = Smith: The Sermon- Don Patterson: 4 Dimensions. You may also want to check out Charlie Parker, Melvin Rhyne, Grant Green, Wes Montgomery, John Coltrane, McCoy Tyner, Elvin Jones, Freddy Hubbard, Kenny Barron etc.... good luck- gfc      
(back) Subject: Re: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2003 03:50:59 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Has Greg gone barking? :)   The best marketing man in the business had to be Leopold Mozart.....classical marketing if ever there was. Poor little Wolfgang was dragged all around Europe still clutching his teddy-bear!   Most "genres" are just that....convenient slots into which the historians and musicologists place things to show the development of style and content (or lack of it!)   Of course, there are always INTERESTING cross-boundary stuff, like Honneger or Bervelier....certainly Stravinski springs to mind. Black musicians, with all their lovely syncopated and stride styles, had a massive influence on classical music, and rightly so.   The various terms for the historical periods were not, I suspect, the work of musicians. The classical period marked the architectural return to the style of classical Greece.....Rome is a perfect example of neo-classicism, as was the work of Wren in London.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK (who cannot tell the difference between modern, post-modern and contemporary.....yet!) ---   Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > Imagine how simple life would be if there were only > 2 kinds of music: good > and bad. I think that terms such as classical, > baroque, jazz, pop, etc...have > been detrimental to the fine arts   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Marion Ohio Aug 30 From: "Tom Yannitell" <tyann@marion.net> Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 22:58:02 -0400   Greetings List members!   The Palace Theatre in Marion Ohio is celebrating it's 75th =3D Anniversary on Saturday August 30th, 2003 at 8PM. =3D20 Vaudeville, Barbershop harmony, and Dennis James at the 3/10 =3D Wurlitzer! Mr. James will accompany a silent film and perform solo selections. Fun for all!   The Palace is a 1400+ capacity, John Eberson designed theatre. It is = =3D a small gem in Central Ohio!Check their website for photos etc. http://www.marionpalace.org/   Tickets are $18. Seniors and students $2 discount.   Contact: The Palace Theatre 276 W. Center St. Marion, Oh 43302 740-383-2101   Tom Y.  
(back) Subject: RE: Organ chamber From: "Kealypaul" <kealypaul@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 21:05:15 -0700 (PDT)   Reminds me of Leonard Bernstein's quote that his favorite instrument to play was "the orchestra."   There's nothing like being surrounded by an orchestra.   As conductor I enjoy "playing an orchestra," but that's because truth told, I am a rather lousy organist.   That doesn't stop me from the love of working with organ installations, especially those with multiple chambers and antiphonals. Truly gifted organists literally play an orchestra. (Although I can cast a woeful glance at the second violin or first trombone, the organist has no one else to blame for a missed note or cue ... that's the ultimate conductor!).   I appreciate all the artistry of an organ, but my playing skills are mediocre at best. So I appreciate, enjoy, admire and truly respect those who have disciplined their skills to excel as a performance organist, whether for worship, accompanying or concert.   My favorite seat in the hall when not on podium surrounded by the various acoursic instrumetns, is front row balcony, surrounded by an awesome aural response from the individual contributing instruments.   But then, those true pipe organists I admire so much experience this every time they mix their various registrations to create that awesome sound.   And although I have much experience in recording album productions and know my way around the best of the studios and control rooms, and I have worked with the best of the electronic organs, as well as MIDI patches, I still believe ...   Loudspeakers and headphones can't even come close to the awesome thrill of speaking pipes.   My stopped 2' worth   Paul     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Hey, ain't that called JAZZ? From: "Jacob Bartle" <dreddnott@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2003 23:06:15 -0700 (PDT)   I've only been playing jazz for a year - I perform on my upright bass with several groups at a community college and can't help but have a blast expressing myself so blatantly. The primary reason I'm writing to the list instead of gleaning out of the vast amount of information you guys put out every day is this - does anyone know of any recordings of jazz tunes or jazz artists playing on real pipe organs? Or does the general timbre of jazz tend to make it sound unappealing?   > Most "genres" are just that....convenient slots into > which the historians and musicologists place things to > show the development of style and content (or lack of > it!)   Or more recently, methods by which bloated record companies create niche markets to which they can sell easily-classified music (nowadays, in the contemporary genres, the easier something is to classify, the more likely it was produced specifically for commercial purposes).   > Of course, there are always INTERESTING cross-boundary > stuff, like Honneger or Bervelier....certainly > Stravinski springs to mind. Black musicians, with all > their lovely syncopated and stride styles, had a > massive influence on classical music, and rightly so.   Yes, and classical music gave back in spades, what with 'third-stream' and the Impressionistic chords of Lennie Tristano and later Duke Ellington.   > The various terms for the historical periods were not, > I suspect, the work of musicians. The classical period > marked the architectural return to the style of > classical Greece.....Rome is a perfect example of > neo-classicism, as was the work of Wren in London.   It seems that about half the time, the preceding period is named by the next one: the Renaissance period named itself, but named the preceding period the "Dark Ages" or at best, Medieval. The Classical period named itself, and, insultingly named the preceding period "Baroque".   > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK (who cannot tell the difference > between modern, post-modern and contemporary.....yet!)   Modern tries to expand the definition of crap, post-modern questions the importance of being crap, and contemporary is crap on purpose, because it sells. :D   -- Jacob   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Ideas? From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2003 11:30:40 +0100   At 'our' place, the Rector leaves it to me to determine when is the right time to begin the play through for the next hymn - usually the Collection ! That gets 'em scurrying back to their places to pick-up their hymn books and dive into their pockets !   Harry [a.k.a. musicman]   -----Original Message----- From: STRAIGHT <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 28 July 2003 03:45 Subject: Re: Ideas?     > "Sharing the Peace" has become a regular part of our >Baptist/Presbyterian service, and something a lot of churches are doing >also, apparently. > Everybody is supposed to say "The peace of Christ be with you" to the >people standing around them, and shake hands. > It's nice, and a good way to make visitors welcome, but it tends to turn >into quite a talkfest, and people move around a lot. The children have been >encouraged to go up and greet the choir. There's always a bunch of them >that run up the steps one one side, shake hands down the line and stomp down >the 3 or 4 steps on the other end----great fun! > We've used Sweet Spirit to end it for a long time. > I go to the piano, greet anybody who speaks to me of course. We had one >pastor who waved at me to start. But for several years now it's been up to >me. I just listen for the buzz to drop, and play the intro---just about as >loud as I can hit it. They all sing and go right back to their seats. > It's a good cue, they know it, it's easy to sing, and it works. And >with all the smiling greetings, it fits perfectly. > But hard as I've tried, it just will not work very well at all on a >church style organ. I've even tried it at other churches, on other organs. > And I can't put my finger on exactly why, either. It's just a nice >piece of music, nothing really weird about it. > >Diane S. > >Diane > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >