PipeChat Digest #3853 - Monday, August 4, 2003
 
Re: Clavanova
  by "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net>
Re: Biltmore House - Lock Haven, PA Skinner..
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: University of Cincinnati
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: Contemporary 'dis'-service
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Contemporary 'dis'-service
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Fwd: The Diapasaon
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Music for a wedding
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Fonts in plain text
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Contemporary 'dis'-service
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
regarding Cincinnati's plan to close their organ department
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Fonts in plain text
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Fonts in plain text
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
IRC tonight
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Contemporary Church Music
  by "Robert Ridgeway" <robert@magneticlab.com>
Re: Fonts in plain text
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Contemporary e'dis'-service
  by "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net>
Re: Fonts in plain text
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
flat pedalboreds
  by "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com>
Re: Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: regarding Cincinnati's plan to close their organ department
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
floundering Cincinnati
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: floundering Cincinnati
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Re: flat pedalboards
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Clavanova From: "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 13:21:14 -0700 (PDT)   We bought a Yamaha Clavinova CLP-990 their top of the line, with spruce keys instead of plastic and moving hammers. Every note has 5 individual samples. Its quite something. Had people arguing, several of those that play piano, if it was real or not. But even on ours the organ sounds are pathetic.   Travis   --- "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> wrote: > We have a Clavinova, but I have mixed feelings about > it. > > Its "piano settings" in general have a better bass > than a spinet > piano.......i.e., they are not a bad "imitation" of > a grand piano. > > And some of the orchestral voices are fairly > realistic--flutes, strings, > esp. > > But the "organ" voices are absolutely awful--thick, > muddy, and yukky. Where > they got those sounds, I don't know. Most of 'em > sound like a 1955 Baldwin > in a bad acoustic. > > I would avoid it absolutely if people think it will > give them an organ. > > Dennis Steckley > & A Six-Pack of Cats > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >     __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New DSL Internet Access from SBC & Yahoo! http://sbc.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Biltmore House - Lock Haven, PA Skinner.. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 16:21:10 -0400   On 8/4/03 11:37 AM, "Swedish5702@aol.com" <Swedish5702@aol.com> wrote:   > The Lock Haven Skinner is still in Lock Haven. > Well, Craig, you should know! And thanks very much.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: University of Cincinnati From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 17:00:01 -0400   Bud et al,   I heard a rumor a couple months ago that CCM was discontinuing its organ degree program. If true, this is indeed disheartening news with respect to a school of UC's prestige and size. Any truth to this, do you know?   Emily A.   <snip> <Cincinnati's organs were the result in part of the merger of the College >of Music and the Conservatory of Music ... the concert halls, teaching >studio, and dance theatre organs were new (and later the Juget); the >practice organs (except for the Holtkamp, which I THINK was bought new; >and one of the Mollers, which was bought used from Oberlin) were what >they were YEARS before Wayne Fisher retired and Roberta Gary became head >of the organ department. I played the Steiner electric action organ in >Parvin Titus' studio in the old Conservatory of Music building.   >Get your facts straight, Dale, before you bad-mouth a marvelous organist >and master teacher like Roberta Gary.<snip>   >Bud Clark, Class of 1971 >Huntington Beach CA    
(back) Subject: Re: Contemporary 'dis'-service From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 22:12:53 +0100 (BST)   Dear Chatters, Well yes, of course Colin, Ron and Patrick, I am not averse to a well played organ in a church service. There are few things more moving than that great British tradition, Christmas carols from King's College, Cambridge, and in those churches where a well thought out service with a carefully planned balance between spoken word and music is more often the case than not, then the organ is an integral part of that worship. But it is not necessary! At the Church of St Thomas on the Bourne in Farnham, where I was organist some 40 years ago, the vicar realised the need for a balance and also to attract the younger generation. Once a month there was a youth service in the evening with guitars and a few modern hymns, which I accompanied on the organ (a good sized 2 manual tracker instrument) some of which I quite enjoyed - after all I was also organist at the Odeon Swiss Cottage and the Gaumont Camden Town! It attracted a well above average congregation for the evening service, and there was a general feeling of well being. So I am not opposed to new ideas. But I also enjoyed Stanford in G, Noble in B minor et al. I recollect the average Sunday evensong congregation being about 50 not including the choir of 24 boys and men. The youth service attracted about 150. I haven't counted heads, but the average congregation at each of the Greek orthodox churches in the town I live in on the slopes of Mount Olympus, which, with a population of 70,000 has 8 main churches, is between 300 and 500 per Sunday, and they are packed at major festivals - which are frequent. It would be nice if we did have organs - after all they can afford the best! John Foss www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Contemporary 'dis'-service From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 17:26:51 -0400   On 8/4/03 3:25 PM, "Patrick Kujawa" <pkujawa@baystar.com> wrote:   > Dear John, > Greek and Russian Orthodox Churches (there may be others in the Eastern > Traditions, but I know of these two for sure)   Like the Serbian and Bulgarian Orthodox, and a fair number of others.   > have always held to the > supremacy of the male voice for chant and choral work. That is your > tradition, and it would be a terrible shame to change that now. > > For those in the Western Rites and Traditions, the organ has become part of > our tradition. From depictions of St. Cecilia holding a positiv in her > hands to first Church organs in Europe in the 13th century to the wonderful > Protestant development   Well, I'm not so sure of the Protestants. I'd be inclined to give THAT credit to the Lutherans; there are a fair number of Protestants who've avoided the organ, until the past century, and then primarily as a recital instrument rather than a liturgical one.   > of the organ as a tool for worship to the great composers of the 20th Century > like Dupre, Durufle, Messiaen, Paul Manz, etc. Not to mention the really great > ones: Bach, Pachelbel, Handel, etc.   And Buxtehude. But you're right, of course. > > For those of us who follow the Christian tradition, our worship started as a > meal in a restaurant nearly 2000 years ago. I guess we could say that > nothing is necessary to worship except "where 2 or 3 are gathered together > in my name..."   OK. > > For Western Christians, to lose the organ as a traditional source of worship > would be as grave as your church replacing the Cantor and Choir with a CD > and a jazz band.   Yes. But relax, Patrick; don't jump on John. I believe that he has an organ in his home, and is a big promoter of organs, and teaches organ (and a lot of other musical and nonmusical things) on a regular basis to the youth in his community. Please realize that he's very much (part of) the fulfillment of what you're looking for, not the enemy of it. > > For me, the real question is: are we teaching the children to reach outside > of themselves to discover another world of tradition and beauty, or are we > attempting to placate their desire to be different from the adults? What > happens when they grow up? Will they look back with respect or contempt? > > Patrick    
(back) Subject: Fwd: The Diapasaon From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 17:29:55 -0500   A Forward from Jerome Butera, Editor of THE DIAPASON, which was sent to the Administration address.   >Request a free sample copy of the August issue of The Diapason. >Cover: Noack Organ Company, Middlesex School, Concord, >Massachusetts. Features: "The Merits of Nearly Equal Temperament," >by Herbert L. Huestis; "Current Perspectives on Organ Research, >American Organ Archives Symposium," by Stephen G. Leist; "A Profile >of Nigerian Organist-Composers," by Godwin Sadoh. News, Here & >There, Appointments, Nunc Dimittis, reviews of books, recordings, >and scores, calendar, organ recital programs, classified >advertising. Send your request to: jbutera@sgcmail.com     -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Music for a wedding From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2003 02:12:28 -0400   Also, don't forget: ANY of the trumpet tunes by David N. Johnson !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: Fonts in plain text From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 18:11:41 -0500   I don't mean to sound complaining, but I have a stupid question. Is everyone typing on the list in plain text? Because I get several different fonts still from listers, and one in particular is so tiny that it is hard to read, particularly with long paragraphs and no spacing between. I just turned 43, and guess I'm going blind along with deaf and crippled. I just didn't know if "plain text" emcompassed more than one font.   I like to read all your posts, but lately I'm spending a lot of time on the computer writing until late at night, and to sit and read tiny print has suddenly gotten very hard for me. Maybe it's the new contacts for the right eye, or the aggravation from working all day at a courthouse with new phones and no working toilets because of the raw sewage in the street.   Anyway, forgive my intrusion and play on through.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: RE: Contemporary 'dis'-service From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 18:11:41 -0500   Well, now, some of Ken Medema's stuff (particularly the earlier stuff I remember) could use the orchestral characteristics of the organ quite well. He really was a creative and funny guy. Of course, I was in college and into more contemporary stuff back when I was familiar with his music.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com       One last thing...Ken Medema also said there is NO reason the organ cannot be used in CCM services. In fact, it adds an interesting dimension to the "band". Think about it...   Jeff          
(back) Subject: regarding Cincinnati's plan to close their organ department From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 16:35:47 -0700   I just received the following reply from Dr. Roberta Gary, chair of the organ dept. and head of the Keyboard Division:   "That's news to me! I'm still teaching, and have no immediate plans for retirement. Just was reappointed as Keyboard Division Head.   Roberta"       Rumors, nothing but rumors (grin) ...   Cheers,   Bud                
(back) Subject: Re: Fonts in plain text From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 19:38:33 -0400   On 8/4/03 7:11 PM, "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > I get several different fonts still from listers, and one in particular is so > tiny that it is hard to read, particularly with long paragraphs and no spacing > between. I just turned 43, and guess I'm going blind along with deaf and > crippled.   Glenda, my dear, I share your concern. "Hard to read" is putting it impossibly ridiculous. And I don't know the answer. A LOT of the incoming messages are tiny beyond belief. I mean "microscopic." Why, I don't know.   I'm on a Mac. When I get those "tinytype" messages (and there a LOTS of them), I select all and hit Command-Shift-+ at least once, and it blows things up. I'm 71. It's essential. I'm SURE there must be a corresponding command for you.   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: Fonts in plain text From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 19:53:56 -0400   Hi Glenda, I'll let you in on a little secret if you promise not to tell anyone else. If you want to know who is sending plain text and who is not, just look at the bottom of the post. If the "Pipe Up and Be Heard" trailer is not attached to the post, you have nailed a culprit. You may then email them privately to suggest they change their ways, or you will send a whole slew of Hell's Angels on their Harleys to visit them for the express purpose of reconfiguring their computers for plain text. In the meantime, I would echo Alan's suggestion that you increase the font size on those messages to make them easier to read.   Shhhhhh Mike   Glenda wrote:   > I don't mean to sound complaining, but I have a stupid question. Is > everyone typing on the list in plain text? Because I get several > different fonts still from listers, and one in particular is so tiny > that it is hard to read, particularly with long paragraphs and no > spacing between. I just turned 43, and guess I'm going blind along with > deaf and crippled. I just didn't know if "plain text" emcompassed more > than one font. > > I like to read all your posts, but lately I'm spending a lot of time on > the computer writing until late at night, and to sit and read tiny print > has suddenly gotten very hard for me. Maybe it's the new contacts for > the right eye, or the aggravation from working all day at a courthouse > with new phones and no working toilets because of the raw sewage in the > street. > > Anyway, forgive my intrusion and play on through. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: IRC tonight From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 17:01:41 -0700   9 p.m., US Eastern Time.   CHeers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Contemporary Church Music From: "Robert Ridgeway" <robert@magneticlab.com> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 19:04:29 -0500   Interestingly there was a commentary this afternoon on NPR's All Thing's Considered concerning this very topic of "Where have all the good older hymns gone?" The commentator is a woman who is about to enter the Methodist seminary and who had spent the last year traveling around the country attending many different churches and she was lamenting (rightfully IMHO) that many churches now have put away their traditional hymnals and are projecting the words onto screens for the congregations to sing. She further decried the "dumbing down" of the new contemporary worship songs. Perhaps if enough people raise their voices over this preposterous indignation then the churches will see fit to bring back the organ into its proper prominence and the poetic and scholarly hymnals back into greater use.   If you go to the link www.npr.org and click on todays All Thing's Considered program you should be able to locate and hear the commentary I just mentioned.   Robert Ridgeway, Curator Sanfilippo Collection      
(back) Subject: Re: Fonts in plain text From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 19:16:42 -0500   >Hi Glenda, > I'll let you in on a little secret if you promise not to tell anyone >else. If you want to know who is sending plain text and who is not, just >look at the bottom of the post. If the "Pipe Up and Be Heard" trailer is = not >attached to the post, you have nailed a culprit. You may then email them >privately to suggest they change their ways, or you will send a whole = slew >of Hell's Angels on their Harleys to visit them for the express purpose = of >reconfiguring their computers for plain text. > In the meantime, I would echo Alan's suggestion that you increase = the >font size on those messages to make them easier to read.   Glenda and everyone else   As you folks know we have been using a new version of the List Server that is "supposed" to strip out all of the HTML/RTF garbage from postings to the list. But it can only do so IF the senders software sends in both Plain Text and "Stylized" text. And Unfortunately, in their infinite wisdom, certain software developers have decided that NO ONE using their software has any need to send in Plain Text so those posts do come through with the "stylized" text.   There is a setting that will "reject" any posting that doesn't have a Plain Text component to it but I have not turned that setting on as I don't want to penalize someone that is "stuck" with one of these dumb pieces of software from participating in the discussions on the list.   I know the developers of the server software are trying to work around ways of dealing with this problem but they haven't solved it as of yet. However, things with the server software have gotten much better - there are less "stylized" posts that do come through the list and the HTML crap has been taken out of the Digests.   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Contemporary e'dis'-service From: "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 20:45:50 -0400   From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 16:52:58 +0100 (BST) do we need organs in church? Is not tradition and belief good enough?   Actually, I agree with you, John. We do not "need" organs in church. I would much prefer to have either no music or music sung unaccompanined, as long as it is traditional and there are no electronic appliances working.   However, a pipe organ and a choir make worship much more heavenly for me, even if I don't get to sing a note.   Scritchies and Haruffarrroooo-bow-ha-wow...   Unkie...   Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at HowlingAcres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 Help Some Animals Free: http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and http://pets.care2.com/welcome?w=308025421 GET PAID to shop: http://ct.par32.com/?id=473FAAG381F58      
(back) Subject: Re: Fonts in plain text From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 20:58:11 -0400   Glenda and Alan,   I have low vision, and although I can see some of the posts, particularly in the font that we are using right now. However, some of the posts are far too small, often in coloured fonts, which make it even worse.   I often have to resort to my screen reader, which reads the message to me via the computer's speakers. But it shouldn't be necessary!   May I put in a plea for plain text only, of a size similar to the one that I am using right now, which is a medium Ariel font.   I think that we have raised this problem in the past, and for a while we get readable posts, but it seems that somewhere along the line we go off the rails!   Bob Conway   >On 8/4/03 7:11 PM, "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote: > > > I get several different fonts still from listers, and one in particular > is so > > tiny that it is hard to read, particularly with long paragraphs and no > spacing > > between. I just turned 43, and guess I'm going blind along with deaf and > > crippled. > >Glenda, my dear, I share your concern. "Hard to read" is putting it >impossibly ridiculous. And I don't know the answer. A LOT of the incoming >messages are tiny beyond belief. I mean "microscopic." Why, I don't know. > >I'm on a Mac. When I get those "tinytype" messages (and there a LOTS of >them), I select all and hit Command-Shift-+ at least once, and it blows >things up. I'm 71. It's essential. I'm SURE there must be a corresponding >command for you. > >Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 22:41:10 EDT   In a message dated 8/4/2003 3:14:00 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   > 1971, I have to correct that information. >   having graduated in 83 and returned this summer for NPM, MOST EVERYTHING IS GONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   Harrison is barely playable, the Balcom and Vaughn(my Favorite)is in disrepair but playable all practice organs from OLD CCM sold including the studio Casavant with = the chiffing strings.   the rest are gone from the GLORY days of CCM.   sorry to burst the happy bubble of memories.   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 22:43:35 EDT   In a message dated 8/4/2003 3:14:00 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   > your facts straight, Dale, before you bad-mouth a marvelous organist > and master teacher like Roberta Gary. >   she is a nice person, she was my advisor, plays the hell out of a lot of music but i stand by my remarks that the department has floundered and = failed under her direction.   my facts are straight, but i try and continue to send students to "OUR" = alma mater every chance i get. dale    
(back) Subject: flat pedalboreds From: "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 21:44:53 -0500   "A knowledge of flat pedal-boards and tracker organs is essential to any professional organist, particularly one who aspires to concertize abroad, where (except for England) ALL the pedal-boards ARE straight AND flat."   Flat pedalboards are also easier to play whilst wearing boots. Didn't = Dupre reason that organists should be able to play even in combat boots? The organ I play has a Moller console of 1950's vintage whose pedals are slightly larger in dimension than the standard AGO board. I am very used = to it and yes, I can play it pretty well in work boots. I have a hell of a time adjusting to those dinky AGO pedals I find elsewhere!   jim   O):^)   _________________________________________________________________ The new MSN 8: advanced junk mail protection and 2 months FREE* http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/junkmail    
(back) Subject: Re: Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 22:47:30 EDT   In a message dated 8/4/2003 3:14:00 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   > knowledge of flat pedal-boards and tracker organs is essential to any > professional organist, particularly one who aspires to concertize > abroad, where (except for England) ALL the pedal-boards ARE straight AND =   > flat. >   as to this and detached toe only, i have no desire to play abroad concertizing that is. And yes, i play legato and leggiro(CANT SPELL IT = THOUGHT!!!!!), the wonders of Walcha et al. Played in Italy on all manners of bizarre pedal boards. fun and interesting but of no use for church which is where we = mostly end up.   cheers and hope life improves for you... dale    
(back) Subject: Re: regarding Cincinnati's plan to close their organ department From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 22:50:26 EDT   In a message dated 8/4/2003 7:32:38 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   > I just received the following reply from Dr. Roberta Gary, chair of the > organ dept. and head of the Keyboard Division: > > "That's news to me! I'm still teaching, and have no immediate plans for > retirement. Just was reappointed as Keyboard Division Head. > > Roberta" > > > > Rumors, nothing but rumors (grin) ... > > Cheers, > >   where was the rumor they were closing? she is on for another 5 years i believe. and picked up 2 additional students this year.   remember the 70's when there were 45 in each of the 3 studios?   da;e    
(back) Subject: floundering Cincinnati From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 20:04:05 -0700   And Wayne Fisher was BETTER? Oh puh-LEEZE! (grin)   I think you need to take into account that virtually ALL the college organ departments are floundering ... Oberlin is to the point that each student can have TWO practice organs, a Flentrop AND a Holtkamp.   Yes, I do remember hearing about problems getting the practice organs set up in the new organ building (the old women's gym) ... I'm sure Dr. Gary intends to remedy the situation as fast as she's able.   But neither she nor any other head of an organ department has any control over what's going on in the CHURCHES, and the general lack of interest in the organ as a career.   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: floundering Cincinnati From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 20:05:39 -0700   Not to argue, but just for the record, the University of Oregon's organ performance program is flourishing with 12 majors, all on the way to great things. Each is a student of Barbara Baird.   EJM     On Monday, August 4, 2003, at 08:04 PM, quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > And Wayne Fisher was BETTER? Oh puh-LEEZE! (grin) > > I think you need to take into account that virtually ALL the college > organ departments are floundering ... Oberlin is to the point that > each student can have TWO practice organs, a Flentrop AND a Holtkamp. > > Yes, I do remember hearing about problems getting the practice organs > set up in the new organ building (the old women's gym) ... I'm sure > Dr. Gary intends to remedy the situation as fast as she's able. > > But neither she nor any other head of an organ department has any > control over what's going on in the CHURCHES, and the general lack of > interest in the organ as a career. > > Bud > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: flat pedalboards From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Mon, 04 Aug 2003 20:30:27 -0700         > > "A knowledge of flat pedal-boards and tracker organs is essential to any > professional organist, particularly one who aspires to concertize > abroad, where (except for England) ALL the pedal-boards ARE straight AND > flat." > >   By no means is the above true. I have played many organs in Switzerland Austria, France and Germany that had some type of radiating and concave pedalboard.   The German standard pedalboard, which I prefer, is both radiating and concave, though with differences from the AGO. Primarily, they are not as radiating. However, when you first see one, it may appear straight simply because it is less radiating than the AGO pedals.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College