PipeChat Digest #3858 - Wednesday, August 6, 2003
 
Ripon
  by "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com>
RE: Ripon
  by "Mark Turnbull" <mark.turnbull@bbc.co.uk>
Re: Favorite reeds
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Favorite Reed
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: teaching theatre organists?
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Favorite Reeds & Theatre Organ Instruction
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Ripon
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Ripon
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
FW: Felix Hell in Norway - 2 (xpost) LONG
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Ripon
  by "Lefevre Vincent" <vincent.lefevre@tiscali.be>
Re: Favorite reeds.....
  by "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net>
Re: Favorite Reeds & Theatre Organ Instruction
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Favorite reeds.....
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Favorite Reed
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Fwd: Vespers for The Feast of the Transfiguration live from  Trinity Cath
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
 

(back) Subject: Ripon From: "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2003 11:13:09 +0100   Hello,   Do any of you fine folk have any information on the organ in Ripon = Cathedral (UK)??=20   I suspect you will Colin!!   Paul.  
(back) Subject: RE: Ripon From: "Mark Turnbull" <mark.turnbull@bbc.co.uk> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 11:34:20 +0100   hello,. they have two. i believe. one a makin, t'other one is an older one, but still works as i understand, built by the legendary harrison and harrison. =3D20 it is good for both recitalist and accompanist, is the old harrison, a happy combination of old fashioned quality, and modern technology. =3D20 there is a book called ripon cathedral a short history of the organs, by robert marsh, available at the cathedral shop (01765601347) =3D20   -----Original Message----- From: Paul [mailto:pianoman1@ntlworld.com]=3D20 Sent: 05 August 2003 11:13 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Ripon     Hello, =3D20 Do any of you fine folk have any information on the organ in Ripon Cathedral (UK)??=3D20 =3D20 I suspect you will Colin!! =3D20 Paul.       BBCi at http://www.bbc.co.uk/   This e-mail (and any attachments) is confidential and may contain=3D20 personal views which are not the views of the BBC unless specifically=3D20 stated. If you have received it in error, please delete it from your system, = do=3D20 not use, copy or disclose the information in any way nor act in=3D20 reliance on it and notify the sender immediately. Please note that = the=3D20 BBC monitors e-mails sent or received. Further communication will=3D20 signify your consent to this.      
(back) Subject: Re: Favorite reeds From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 06 Aug 2003 06:59:28 -0500   Hi! Hmmm...interesting. Just curious, and not trying to insult your opinion or anything....but have you heard Skinner reeds pre- GDH? My church has an unaltered 1923 Skinner, 4/43,op. 443 and the reeds (esp. oboe, clarinet, french horn, vox), are just as beautiful if not more than any GDH stuff I've heard. Besides, the way I understood it is that GDH didn't mess with any of Skinner's signature stops when he began his time with the company, he merely tolerated them. "GDH Skinner" reeds are really just Skinner reeds.Interestingly enough, as fary as my opinion is concerned, having played several unaltered Skinners and read about both the Skinner and Aeolian Skinners, I think GDH should've stayed in England or come here and started his own company rather than wrecking what Skinner had done. I also think that he should never have been let near a Skinner instrument. Flame away, if you will, but these are my opinions.   Blessings, Beau Surratt Minister of Worship and Music United Church of Hyde Park Piano Instructor, Hyde Park Suzuki Institute Chicago,IL Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Favorite Reed From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 09:11:21 EDT   In a message dated 8/5/2003 5:36:09 AM Eastern Daylight Time, brad_taylor32@hotmail.com writes:     > Let's talk about something happy. Here's the topic I propose for 4:30 = AM: >   here's a couple...   Cor Anglaise (Imitative English Horn)...with correct trem is haunting in = it's tonal quality...particularly liked the one in the 1963 AE-S (or maybe '62) =   from Philharmonic Hall, NYC.   The Pontifical Trumpet at the Shrine in D.C. the first use of Bronze resonators, skillfully voiced by uncle Adolf (Zacik) and LOUD!!! a real = party-horn.   Rick in VA    
(back) Subject: Re: teaching theatre organists? From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 09:31:15 EDT   In a message dated 8/5/2003 1:28:19 PM Eastern Daylight Time, david@blackiris.com writes:     > Eastman wasn't the only school that taught theatre organ. The > American Conservatory in Chicago and the Chicago Musical College also > had theatre organ departments.   the American Conservatory in Chicago is where Lee Irwin went to study, and =   late in life was one of the most highly regarded "old school" theatre = organists and silent-move accompanists. Lee made 2 LP' for Capitol records in the 1970's, one comprised of music he had composed for silent movie scores = "Sounds of the Silents" recorded in thurmont MD at Dick Kline's MAAH-velous 4M = WurliTzer.   Rick in VA    
(back) Subject: Favorite Reeds & Theatre Organ Instruction From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 09:33:51 -0500   I've got a lovely ca. 1912 M=F6ller oboe of which I am very fond...........acidly sweet and gentle.   BTW, has anyone else noted how abruptly the reed stops sounding with d-e and e-p actions? The valve snaps shut and the reed doesn't end gracefully--it just stops. Often gives a choppy quality to passages. I think that's one place trackers really shine. =20   On college theatre organ instruction, Vincennes University (a junior college, but they've been around since 1803 so they can call themselves what they wish), has considered offering instruction on their 2/-- Wurlitzer in the here and now. I don't know if they've done any of it or not. George Smith would be the instructor. He has made a number of non-commercial recordings on the instrument.   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower        
(back) Subject: Re: Ripon From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 11:05:35 EDT   Hi Mark:   As of 1995 the H&H was still fully functional and glorious in sound. It is not a behemouth by any means but the scales were generous and the blend wonderful. Harrison's men were there that day while I was touring and gave her a rip. What a fine organ.   Ron    
(back) Subject: RE: Ripon From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 16:19:27 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   I have to correct Mark re: Ripon MINSTER (!)   The pipe organ is a four manual instrument of about 70 speaking stops originally built by T C Lewis, the re-built by Harrison & Harrison of Durham with increased reed pressures for the Tubas and other reeds.   It still gives a good account of itself; especially in accompaniment work.   As I am currently in Holland (Rotterdam) I do not have access to my notes. However, anyone can check for themselves if they search under NPOR. This will direct them to the web site of the National Pipe Organ Register. It can be a bit tricky to use, so the best type of search is just to type in the name of a town such as RIPON. This will bring up all the instruments in that town, but scrolling through will reveal the details required.   Hope this helps.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Mark Turnbull <mark.turnbull@bbc.co.uk> wrote: > hello,. > they have two. > i believe. > one a makin, > t'other one is an older one, but still works as i > understand, built by > the legendary harrison and harrison. > -----Original Message----- > From: Paul [mailto:pianoman1@ntlworld.com] > Sent: 05 August 2003 11:13 > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Ripon > > > Hello, > > Do any of you fine folk have any information on the > organ in Ripon > Cathedral (UK)?? > > I suspect you will Colin!! > > Paul.   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: FW: Felix Hell in Norway - 2 (xpost) LONG From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 06 Aug 2003 12:46:07 -0400   By the kind permission of Mr. Benjamin Chi of piporg-L, I am forwarding to two organ lists the second and last report on Felix Hell's visit to Norway   Alan   Subject: Fw: Felix Hell in Norway - 2   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Kyrre Svarva" <kyrre@NVG.NTNU.NO> To: <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 3:12 PM Subject: Felix Hell in Norway - 2     Felix Hell in Norway - 2   Starting July 25th and ending August 2nd, the St. Olav Festival 2003 comprises a large number of events (http://www.olavsfestdagene.no/). In the official Norwegian programme, where events are listed by the hour, there ar= e 15 to 20 events every day. A quick count shows that a total of approximatel= y 40 events, including religious services, take place inside Nidaros cathedral. In addition, there are opening hours for visitors and hours set aside for moving chairs and other rigging purposes, and times for tuning th= e organs. And of course there has to be rehersal hours. All this makes for an extremely tight schedule at the cathedral, and artists - including Felix - have had to rehearse at odd hours, even in the middle of the night. Even though it gets light very early - in July it is dark only a few hours round midnight - having to work in the middle of the night, possibly having your circadian rhythms disrupted, is not ideal. And things were to turn out even worse. Tuesday 29th, early in the day, the Steinmeyer organ had a breakdown that rendered its main parts unplayable. Rehersal times had to be canceled, the organ builder had to be called in, and time found for him and his team to fix the fault. The same evening, a work for choir, recitalist and organ was scheduled, and this had to be moved from the west end of the cathedral, where the main organ is, to the chancel, since the chancel organ (i.e. the former second swell division of the Steinmeyer as it once were (see disposition at http://www.hf.ntnu.no/mus/org/nidarosdomen/steinm-e.htm) was still usable. This left Cathedral Organist Oddbj=F8rn S=E6b=F8 a mere three hours to re-prepare all registration changes. The organ breakdown would have been a great disadvantage for Felix too, had not the organ builder Mr. Thorkildsen and his crew managed to make the instrument work again on recor= d time, even, as I understood, making it possible for Felix to reclaim lost rehersal time the next day.   As mentioned in an earlier posting, Felix had already held one of three lunchtime recitals at the Wagner organ (http://www.hf.ntnu.no/mus/org/nidarosdomen/wagner-e.htm). The remaining tw= o took place Wednesday 30th and Thursday 31st July. They were well attended, as between 200 and 400 visitors were at the cathedral at the times of both recitals, and to me (who again had taken the opportunity to leave work early) they constituted an excellent warming-up for the main event - the evening concert on the 31st. And this concert - the main event of Felix' Norway tour - simply was an incredible experience. An audience of approximately 200 had found their way to the cathedral to hear Felix, who started out at the Wagner organ with the following programme:   J.S.Bach: - Fantasy and Fugue, g minor, BWV542 - "Schm=FCcke dich, o liebe seele", BWV654 - Prelude and Fugue, D major, BWV532   Warming up on the Fantasy, Felix soon seemed to fall into the state of flow that he obviously experiences while playing. The second piece, "Schm=FCcke dich" from the Leipziger chorales, was expertly played, even though I wondered a little bit at the registration, as the solo voice displayed an overtone (I believe it was a fifth) that was so strong that it seemed to completely overshadow the foundation tone in certain registers, at least from my vantage point at the back of the south transept. Getting into the D major prelude and fugue, Felix really excelled, and at the end of this piece, the audience responded heartily with a spontaneous applause.   Applause at organ concerts is a strange thing. The tradition here in Norwa= y is to applaude only at the end of a church organ concert (and some times no= t at all). However, at any other kind of concert, the normal tradition is to applaude between pieces, at the end, an even at the beginning, when the conductor or the artists first enter the stage. But what are the factors that determine this difference in behaviour? Is it that the organ concert i= s held in a church? Yes, it seems that has something to do with it. When an organ concert is held in a concert hall with an organ, "normal" applause traditions apply. But it is not only that. I witnessed an excellent example the day before Felix' concert, when the famous Norwegian trumpeter Ole Edvard Antonsen held a concert at the cathedral together with one of the organists at Oslo cathedral, K=E5re Nordstoga. Every number was a trumpet-organ duet, except one, Bach's Fantasy and Fugue in G major, BWV 542, of course played solo by Mr. Nordstoga. But at this concert, "normal" procedure was followed, with applause at the beginning and after every piece> - although not between movements within the same work. Thus, strangely enough, it seems that the organ itself also has something to do with it. The rule, seems to be: If (A) the building is a church, and (B) th= e only instrument played is an organ, the rule is to applaude only at the end= .. But if any other instrument is played, even if it is only one, and even if it is only played together with the organ, use "normal" applause procedures= .. And this is not all. I believe there is yet another factor that comes into it: If the music is religious in nature, such as an oratorio, then audience= s will applaude only at the end, even though other instruments are played, with or without organ. So, we get the following rule: If (A) the building a church and (B) the only instrument played is an organ, or if (A) the building a church and (C) the music is clearly religious, such as an oratorio, then applaude at the end or not at all. In all other cases, applaude when artists appear, and after every completed work performed. And to top it off, organists can have different views and approaches to the phenomenon of applause. I know organists who oppose applause in church to the degree that they write in their concert programmes, "No applause, please". And at the other end of the scale, I remember Wayne Marshall's ver= y exciting concert at Nidaros cathedral last year (or was it the year before)= : When the audience did not applaude after the first number, he turned toward= s us at the Steinmeyer console and said that we should feel free to respond t= o his playing if we liked to. "As far as I'm concerned," he said, "we are not in church now, we are at a concert hall".   As for Felix, he certainly seemed to appreciate and enjoy the perhaps unexpected applause at the end of the BWV532 - and it was well deserved. He then proceeded to the Steinmeyer console, and we (the audience) moved over from the southern transept to the nave. At the Steinmeyer, Felix played the following very well composed programme:   F.Mendelssohn: - Sonata No.1, f minor, op. 65 J.G.Rheinberger: - "Abendfriede" from op.156 C.Franck: - Chorale No.3, a minor F.Liszt: - "Consolation", D flat major - Prelude and fugue on B-A-C-H   It soon became evident that Felix had not been idling while rehearsing at the Steinmeyer. I was amazed that he was able to exploit the possibilities that this instrument offers, despite the limitations imposed by its somewha= t doubtful technical condition, and the alterations it was subjected to in th= e sixties. As you may be aware from reading the instrument's stoplist, one of the two swell departments were then used to make a chancel organ at the other end of the cathedral. The chancel organ has its own console, but can also be played from the main console at the west end gallery. Felix used this possibility extremely well. By playing the three parts (there is also the Fernwerk up in the main tower) of the organ up against each other, he created and enhanced dialogue effects in certain parts of the Mendelssohn sonata that were simply wonderful.   Regarding the Rheinberger piece, I had heard Felix play that earlier on in his concert at V=E6rnes church. I later commented to Felix' father that I had not heard any music by Rheinberger before, and that I thought "Abendfriede" was a very beautiful, moody piece. He then told me that I had heard nothing yet, and to wait till Felix' concert at the cathedral. At this point, he ha= d of course heard Felix play it in rehersal at the cathedral, so he knew what he was talking about. And what he suggested was right: Having this piece played on the Steinmeyer was a different world compared to having it played on a small tracker. Here, Felix created the most incredible registration by combining strings and other soft stops from several departments, apparently including the fernwerk and chancel organ. I do not know exactly which stops he used, but he produced a beautiful, soft, shivering, yet full-bodied soun= d that I certainly have not heard anybody get out of this organ before. I believe Felix must have been particularly thrilled and inspired by the Steinmeyer organ, despite its deficiencies.   The last part of the concert was the Franck chorale, the soft and beautiful "Consolation" by Liszt, which I had not heard before, and then Liszt's mighty B-A-C-H. Here, Felix again demonstrated his incredible musical abilities, giving body and shape to these great works of music. He particularly excelled with his interpretation of the Liszt, which I as a listener have earlier found not to be too easy to follow. Felix' interpretation, on the other hand, was clear-cut and well shaped, with the B-A-C-H > standing out with clarity, dignity and elegance.   In the second part of the concert, the audience followed up with enthusiastic applause, and after the Liszt B-A-C-H had ended, it soon becam= e evident that an encore must come. But what to play after such a tour-de-force as the Liszt B-A-C-H? Felix was not unprepared, and played a really excellent Finale from Vierne's first symphony. As the applause after this would not cease, Felix stepped down from the gallery and gave a short speech, thanking the audience for their enthusiasm. He then said he had one last piece for us, and would like to end on a quieter note by playing the fourth movement (Adagio) from Widor's fifth symphony. And when this was followed up by an immediate burst of applause, Felix rounded the whole thin= g off by launching directly into the fifth movement (Toccata)!   The concert was reviewed in the local newspaper, and the reviewer's comment= s were favourable indeed. "It was as if the human musical consciousness moved in an unbroken line from the young Felix Hell, via all the mechanical contraptions of the Wagner organ as well as the Steinmeyer organ, and fille= d Nidaros cathedral with pure spiritual abundance. An incredible musical capacity manifested itself in this young organist. At only seventeen, he masters the greatest challenges of organ literature." (My translation.) Unfortunately, the review was rather brief, and covered only the time up to and including the Mendelssohn, due to an unfortunate deadline to get the review into the paper the next day. Because of this the reviewer had to write while in church, but he did stay throughout the concert. When I spoke with him two days later, it became evident that he had been as excited abou= t Felix' playing as myself - he called it "a unique experience".   It is hard to describe an experience such as a concert like this, when you really feel touched by the music. Lately, I have been listening to an excellent CD by the Royal Scottish National Orchestra and soprano Claire Rutter, with music by the English composer Gustav Holst. The CD contains th= e well-known "Planets", including the recent appendix "Pluto - the Renewer", by Colin Matthews. But even more interesting, the CD ends with a "Scena for Soprano and Orchestra" called "The Mystic Trumpeter", based on Walt Whitman's poem with the same title. In his poem, Whitman says about the "mystic trumpeter": "O trumpeter! methinks I am myself the instrument thou playest! Thou melt'st my heart, my brain - thou movest, drawest, changest them at will" and, "Sing to my soul - renew its languishing faith and hope"= .. At risk of being slightly turgid, I'd like to say this describes rather wel= l the experience of an excellent performance of excellent music, such as Felix' concert. In his case, you only have to think "organist" instead of "trumpeter".   The day after the concert, Felix and his father were due to leave for Bergen, on the west coast, for the final concert of the Norway tour. Having taken on the task of providing an itinerary for this 660 km drive, I was able to send them over the very scenic Sognefjell mountain range, and past = a few other sights, including stave churches, which Felix' father had said he was particularly interested in seeing. Sorry to say, I have heard little about how the concert at Bergen Cathedral went. By now, they are well back home in Germany, preparing for the next concert in Magdeburg.   Hearing Felix play was the most satisfying concert experience I have had in a very long time, and I do hope I will get the opportunity to hear him live again in the future.   Greetings from Trondheim, K. ------------ Kyrre Svarva Trondheim, Norway     ------ End of Forwarded Message    
(back) Subject: RE: Ripon From: "Lefevre Vincent" <vincent.lefevre@tiscali.be> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 20:45:58 +0200   Try this URL http://www.riponcathedral.org.uk/   =3D20   Vincent from Bruges Belgium   =3D20   _____ =3D20   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = =3D Paul Sent: dinsdag 5 augustus 2003 12:13 To: pipechat@pipechat.org   =3D20   Hello,   =3D20   Do any of you fine folk have any information on the organ in Ripon =3D Cathedral (UK)??=3D20   =3D20   I suspect you will Colin!!   =3D20   Paul.      
(back) Subject: Re: Favorite reeds..... From: "Bruce Cornely" <cremona@cervo.net> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 17:40:51 -0400   Another favorite reed was on a one-manual organ (builder unremembered) that was heard at an OHS convention (year unremembered, too). The reed was a trumpet 8 and was amazingly warm, rich and velvety, and blended perfectly into the ensemble. Not too loud or too soft. Goldilocks would have loved it, too!   Scritchies and Haruffarrroooo-bow-ha-wow...   Unkie...   Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at HowlingAcres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 Help Some Animals Free: http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and http://pets.care2.com/welcome?w=308025421 GET PAID to shop: http://ct.par32.com/?id=473FAAG381F58      
(back) Subject: Re: Favorite Reeds & Theatre Organ Instruction From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 16:46:02 -0500   At 9:33 AM -0500 8/6/03, First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois wrote: > >On college theatre organ instruction, Vincennes University (a junior >college, but they've been around since 1803 so they can call themselves >what they wish), has considered offering instruction on their 2/-- >Wurlitzer in the here and now. I don't know if they've done any of it >or not. George Smith would be the instructor. He has made a number of >non-commercial recordings on the instrument.   If I am not mistaken there was a person that had a double Organ Major degree program at University of Michigan School of Music just recently - one in Classical Organ and the other in Theatre Organ. i think the gentleman's name is Steven Ball - http://www.stevenball.com/bio.html   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Favorite reeds..... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 06 Aug 2003 14:51:29 -0700   There is such a reed, named "Oboe", on the little 1m Johnson tracker in the UCC (former Evangelische) church (I think it is) in National City, CA, just south of San Diego ... installed in a shallow alcove on the south side of the divided chancel, the little organ fills the tall, narrow German-style "hall" church quite nicely. Lyle Blackinton has restored it, and maintains it. The last I heard, the people were very proud of it, and KNEW what they had.   Cheers,   Bud   Bruce Cornely wrote: > Another favorite reed was on a one-manual organ (builder unremembered) that > was heard at an OHS convention (year unremembered, too). The reed was a > trumpet 8 and was amazingly warm, rich and velvety, and blended perfectly > into the ensemble. Not too loud or too soft. Goldilocks would have loved > it, too! > > Scritchies and Haruffarrroooo-bow-ha-wow... > > Unkie... > > Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at > HowlingAcres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 > Help Some Animals Free: http://tinyurl.com/2j5i > and http://pets.care2.com/welcome?w=308025421 > GET PAID to shop: http://ct.par32.com/?id=473FAAG381F58 > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: RE: Favorite Reed From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 18:57:08 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Subjective answer to an interesting subjective question:   Hautbois (Oboe) 8', pref. Cavaille-Coll of course, although my parish organ has a spanish one that isn't bad too. Excellent solo stop, but matches perfectly with the flue chorusses and plenum. BTW Cesar Franck took advantage of this fact.   Andres (fascinated by the answers to this!) ================================ First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.   ----- Original Message ----- From: Tyler Robertson <brad_taylor32@hotmail.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 5:35 AM Subject: Favorite Reed     > Let's talk about something happy. Here's the topic I propose for 4:30 AM: > What is your favorite reed and why?      
(back) Subject: Fwd: Vespers for The Feast of the Transfiguration live from Trinity Cathedral, St. Petersburg, Russia. From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 06 Aug 2003 18:36:52 -0400   I sent this to Bud, but then thought that there might be others on the = list who would like to hear this glorious singing.   Bob Conway >Date: Wed, 06 Aug 2003 18:30:09 -0400 >To: Bud <quilisma@socal.rr.com> >From: Bob Conway <conwayb@sympatico.ca> >Subject: Vespers for The Feast of the Transfiguration live from Trinity >Cathedral, St. Petersburg, Russia. > >Hi Bud, > >I don't know if it interests you, but the BBC Radio 3 Choral Evensong is >from St. Petersburg this week. What glorious singing! > >The URL is: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/classical/cevespers.shtml > >Hope you enjoy it. > >Bob