PipeChat Digest #3860 - Thursday, August 7, 2003
 
Re: hated reeds
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
RE: Ripon
  by "Lefevre Vincent" <vincent.lefevre@tiscali.be>
Re: Favorite Reed
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Floundering
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: hated reeds
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Ripon
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: hated reeds
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Floundering
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Dana Robinson
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
I studied with...
  by "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net>
Re: I studied with...
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Waltham/Boston
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: I studied with...
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
RE: I studied with...
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: I studied with...
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: I studied with...
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: I studied with...
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: I studied with...
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: I studied with...
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: I studied with...
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: I studied with...
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Pipe Organ Publicity in Nova Scotia
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
practice possibilities: HELP!
  by "tom carter" <tcarter215@yahoo.com>
Re: I studied with...
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
 

(back) Subject: Re: hated reeds From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 07:22:16 +0100   You can't really say you dislike 'the Vox Humana' - by which I take it you mean *all* Vox Humanas. Reed stops vary enormously - and even among Vox's there are good ones and, admittedly, some truly awful ones. Another thing about the Vox - it is not intended for use alone (or only rarely and briefly). It is primarily a 'colour reed' - for use in 'decorating' other sounds - mainly the flutes. Without a 4ft flute a Vox is of little use - add 8 and/or 4ft flutes and strings and of course a tremulant that works then you may have something good. Even without trem a Vox + 4ft Flute can be a very useful solo combination.   Bruce Miles   website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2003 4:36 AM Subject: hated reeds     I dislike the vox humana. I guess I have only heard awful ones that buzz and are pathetic. Buzzey little reeds on light windpressure aren't any fun either. I really like strings better. Gary    
(back) Subject: RE: Ripon From: "Lefevre Vincent" <vincent.lefevre@tiscali.be> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 13:07:59 +0200   Right you are Mark. See URL http://www.riponcathedral.org.uk/   Vincent from Bruges, Belgium   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Mark Turnbull Sent: donderdag 7 augustus 2003 8:49 To: 'PipeChat'   I don't wish to be picky, but ripon is a cathedral, indeed the oldest cathedral in england   -----Original Message----- From: Colin Mitchell [mailto:cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk]=20 Sent: 06 August 2003 16:19 To: PipeChat Subject: RE: Ripon     Hello,   I have to correct Mark re: Ripon MINSTER (!)   The pipe organ is a four manual instrument of about 70 speaking stops originally built by T C Lewis, the re-built by Harrison & Harrison of Durham with increased reed pressures for the Tubas and other reeds.   It still gives a good account of itself; especially in accompaniment = work.   As I am currently in Holland (Rotterdam) I do not have access to my notes. However, anyone can check for themselves if = they search under NPOR. This will direct them to the web site of the National Pipe Organ Register. It can be a bit tricky to use, so the best type of search is just to type in the name of a town such as RIPON. This will = bring up all the instruments in that town, but scrolling through will reveal = the details required.   Hope this helps.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Mark Turnbull <mark.turnbull@bbc.co.uk> wrote: > hello,. > they have two. > i believe. > one a makin, > t'other one is an older one, but still works as i > understand, built by > the legendary harrison and harrison. > -----Original Message----- > From: Paul [mailto:pianoman1@ntlworld.com] > Sent: 05 August 2003 11:13 > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Ripon >=20 >=20 > Hello, > =20 > Do any of you fine folk have any information on the > organ in Ripon > Cathedral (UK)?? > =20 > I suspect you will Colin!! > =20 > Paul. =20   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/ "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org         BBCi at http://www.bbc.co.uk/   This e-mail (and any attachments) is confidential and may contain=20 personal views which are not the views of the BBC unless specifically=20 stated. If you have received it in error, please delete it from your system, do=20 not use, copy or disclose the information in any way nor act in=20 reliance on it and notify the sender immediately. Please note that the=20 BBC monitors e-mails sent or received. Further communication will=20 signify your consent to this.   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Favorite Reed From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 11:44:34 +0100 (BST)   The Choir Clarionet at St. Anne's, Limehouse John Foss     ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: RE: Floundering From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 11:43:08 -0400   Alicia Zeilenga writes:   >I think that about the same could be said for the University of Illinois. Currently there are 2 undergraduates and 4 graduate students, but there are usually quite a few non-major students. Both of us undergraduates transferred into the School of Music after taking lessons as non-majors.   Who teaches at the University of Illinois now, and what are the instruments? I'm afraid I've lost track and haven't visited for decades.   I was a graduate student of Jerald Hamilton 1970/72 (with one semester studying with Paul Pettinga because Hamilton was on sabbatical).   And do you know how the music doing at the Chapel of Saint John the Divine? I know that they have a Buzard organ now, one of the builder's earliest instruments and one of which they are very proud and consider a showpiece. Poor Jerald had to make do with a minimal Allen, and before that a miserable old Baldwin, all his years there. For a nationally-known recitalist and teacher to put up with instruments like that when quite a few other churches in town have fine pipe organs speaks volumes about his dedication to his church: he was a devout Anglican through and through. But the choir he built there, and their repertoire, I always considered nothing short of miraculous. They would do any cathedral proud. He could get better singing out of plain old volunteer folx than anyone else I've ever known. The sopranos sounded like boys. I hope the program today maintains that same integrity and intensity. The long tenure of Fr. Timothy Hallett as rector/chaplain (who arrived around 1973, to everyone's relief, after a rather unhappy predecessor) leads me to be optimistic that stability and common sense might still reign there, unlike so many other places.        
(back) Subject: RE: hated reeds From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 11:49:54 -0400   > It is primarily a 'colour reed' - for use in 'decorating' other sounds - mainly the flutes.   Is it kosher to use the vox humana together with the string celestes? That is the way it was typically used in my culturally deprived environment (I'm talking about my local colleagues-- I was usually too culturally deprived to have a vox humana at all). But a couple people who seemed to be more knowledgeable about things in general would be heard to moan that they couldn't STAND such a registration: strings, vox humana, and tremolo.   I've never spent enough time with a vox humana to learn the uses of it (except, of course, when a composer like Tournemire calls for it specifically).      
(back) Subject: RE: Ripon From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 11:59:52 -0400   >The pipe organ is a four manual instrument of about 70 speaking stops originally built by T C Lewis, the re-built by Harrison & Harrison of Durham with increased reed pressures for the Tubas and other reeds.   I have a recording from the 70s, with Perrin as the organist (forget his first name). This recording does not make the instrument sound attractive at all. On the basis of this disc, I would have to call it my least favorite English cathedral organ. But of course, recordings are not always true-to-life. It could just be an unfortunate microphone setup etc.   Ripon is one of the few major English cathedrals that I have yet to visit, but I'd certainly want to plan on it next time I am in that country. It has a special place in my heart for the fact that it recently opened a choir school (sometime in the 1980s, if I recall). To raise money for this adornment, the chapter, somewhat controversially, sold many rare old books from its library. While I like rare old books and regret it when a church needs to sell any, I like choir schools even better. There's no doubt in my mind which asset will contribute more to the church's future, as well as its present. It was an admirable decision.        
(back) Subject: Re: hated reeds From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 09:14:38 -0700   ANYTHING is "kosher" if it SOUNDS good.   Those who turn up their noses at vox humana + strings + tremulant never heard some of the towering Anglican service-players of previous generations ... Noble, Thalben-Ball, Willan, Farnum, Coke-Jephcott, Dr. Edwin Arthur Kraft, etc. etc. etc.   One of Dr. Kraft's favorite combinations for a cantus firmus in Bach was Sw. Vox Celeste, Nazard, Oboe, Tremulant (4m E.M. Skinner, Trinity Cathedral, Cleveland, OH ... gone now, sadly).   Sw. Vox Humana + Stopped Diapason + tremulant was also a favorite 19th century / early 20th century combination.   The Offertory "moment" at St. Bart's in NYC used to be FAMOUS ... up to full organ, and then gradually down to nothing but the Vox Humana in the Dome or Echo organ.   Cheers,   Bud   Emmons, Paul wrote: >>It is primarily a 'colour reed' - for use in 'decorating' other > > sounds - mainly the flutes. > > Is it kosher to use the vox humana together with the string celestes? That > is the way it was typically used in my culturally deprived environment (I'm > talking about my local colleagues-- I was usually too culturally deprived to > have a vox humana at all). But a couple people who seemed to be more > knowledgeable about things in general would be heard to moan that they > couldn't STAND such a registration: strings, vox humana, and tremolo. > > I've never spent enough time with a vox humana to learn the uses of it > (except, of course, when a composer like Tournemire calls for it > specifically). > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: RE: Floundering From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 11:46:37 -0500   > Who teaches at the University of Illinois now, and what are the > instruments?   Dana Robinson is the instructor. And there are 2 Buzard organs, 1 in the studio and 1 on the 3rd floor. We are supposed to get a Noack practice organ in a few weeks. There is also a Casavant in the Hall.   > > And do you know how the music doing at the Chapel of Saint John the > Divine?   Linda Buzard is the organist-choir director, but I have never been there for services.   > I know that they have a Buzard organ now, one of the builder's earliest > instruments and one of which they are very proud and consider a > showpiece.   It is not a bad organ. One of my friends did his Senior Recital there.   Pictures of most of the organs can be found at http://www2.uiuc.edu/ro/agoui/localorgans.html   Alicia      
(back) Subject: Dana Robinson From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 13:09:53 -0400   Dear Paul, Alicia, and anyone else interested:   I have twice heard Dana Robinson play, once in the Boston OHS Convention, and last year, in the Chicago OHS convention. He is a wonderful player, and I have written reviews of both those events. If you would like to see them, I will be glad to dig up e-copies and send them along.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2003 12:46 PM Subject: RE: Floundering     > > > Who teaches at the University of Illinois now, and what are the > > instruments? > > Dana Robinson is the instructor. And there are 2 Buzard organs, 1 in the > studio and 1 on the 3rd floor. We are supposed to get a Noack practice > organ in a few weeks. There is also a Casavant in the Hall. > > >      
(back) Subject: I studied with... From: "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 14:15:20 -0400   Hi gang,   What is the protocol of using the phrase, "I studied with...so & so"?   Does that mean the person was in a college class under that professor? Does it have to mean private lessons? Are there criteria for how much instruction must have been given? certain number of hours, classes, weeks, months? Must it have been master classes or could it be undergraduate classes?   Does it have to be in a class environment at all? Can it just be a mentoring situation?   Paul R. Swank Who studied long and hard    
(back) Subject: Re: I studied with... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 11:44:54 -0700   I usually SAY which it was ... I studied with Ramona Beard (high school), Fenner Douglass and Roberta Gary (undergraduate), and Bob Anderson (graduate); I did summer workshops with Tagliavini, Alain, Heiller, and Lagace; I attended master classes with Craighead; I studied improvisation for a year (I think it was) with Gerre Hancock.   Cheers,   Bud   Paul R. Swank wrote: > Hi gang, > > What is the protocol of using the phrase, "I studied with...so & so"? > > Does that mean the person was in a college class under that professor? > Does it have to mean private lessons? Are there criteria for how much > instruction must have been given? certain number of hours, classes, > weeks, months? Must it have been master classes or could it be > undergraduate classes? > > Does it have to be in a class environment at all? Can it just be a > mentoring situation? > > Paul R. Swank > Who studied long and hard > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: Re: Waltham/Boston From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 14:41:45 -0400   On 8/6/03 10:22 PM, "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> wrote:   > Our Saturday "evening" mass is at 4 p.m. (barely evening, but = anyway...), so I > was thinking that a 20 minute program just before mass would net a = captive > audience. The response so far has been encouraging.   David, would the pastor put up with doing the mini-recitals at 4 to 4:25, and the mass at 4:30?   1. People are busy on Saturdays, so don't create the problem of trying to get them to "come even earlier" than the accustomed hour.   2. People who don't pay attention to scheduled events, etc., would walk = in at 4 for mass, and get a mini-recital first, and maybe decide they LIKE that!   Of COURSE the honorarium should be based on free-will offering. Don't = know if it works with your folks, but we do that by putting a basket in the narthex so they can fill it up on the way out (after mass, in your case, most likely).   When YOU're the recitalist, can you some of Sunday's music for the = recital, thus reducing your work/rehearsal load? (Or do you already do your Sunday music at the Saturday mass as well? Well, it was a thought.)   I have devout RC friends who do lots of weekends in Beverly (former home); is that anywhere near Waltham? I'd love to pester them to attend your series when they're in town.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: I studied with... From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 14:55:37 EDT   Hi all,   I used to believe   "I studied with" meant your primary Prof in college and teachers along the =   way.   I have since learned that if you sit in on a master class for 2 hours some =   Saturday at an AGO meeting you can claim that person as an "I have studied = with"   Rather bogus to me....cannot wait to see where this question goes.   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: RE: I studied with... From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 15:02:07 -0400   My impression: it depends on context. Sooner or later, one should be explicit.   I often call Miriam Duncan one of my teachers, even one of my favorite and most influential teachers, and it is the truth. I did formally take two classes from her that all organ majors at Lawrence took, by custom if not by requirement. Her influence went far beyond those, not only on me but on all my fellow organ students, even on a few Lawrence students who played the organ barely if at all, but loved the instrument enough to participate in the AGO student group. But my applied-organ teacher was LaVahn Maesch, and I'd never want to minimize the debt I owe to him as well.   If you learn something through concentrated effort under the guidance of someone else, I don't know how else to describe the experience than to say that you studied with that teacher. Yet there is one hard-and-fast rule. At least without of the formal evidence of a university stranscript, it is improper to tell others that you are "a student of X" unless X has given permission to you to call yourself that. Musicians and teachers have their good names to protect, and it is only fair that their reputations should not be sullied by unrepresentative, incompetent, or ridiculous performers who imply that some genuine artist taught them what they do.      
(back) Subject: RE: I studied with... From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 15:49:14 -0400   At 03:02 PM 8/7/03 -0400, it was written;   >My impression: it depends on context. Sooner or later, one should be >explicit.   I have to agree, - I was a member of the Hampstead Choral Society, which was formed and conducted by Martindale Sidwell, He taught me how to sing Bach! But did I study with him ....?   During that time we did Benjamin Britten's "St. Nicholas" with Peter Pears as the soloist, and Benjamin Britten overseeing the last couple of rehearsals, - does that fall into the "I studied with ..."?   I might add that Peter Pears literally took over the tenors and basses when at the penultimate rehearsal we fell apart in the storm chorus, - and I hasten to add that within the space of half an hour he had got us all up to speed! He was a wonderful teacher, - but did I study with him? - I think not, but I got the benefit of his experience.   I think that it is fine to say that "I worked with ..." and say what you worked on, but not to say "I studied with ..."   Just my two penn'orth,   Bob Conway   Besides, - then one cannot be considered as embellishing the truth!    
(back) Subject: Re: I studied with... From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 15:55:45 -0400   On 8/7/03 2:55 PM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > Rather bogus to me....cannot wait to see where this question goes. >=3D20   Oh, Dale! Haven=3DB9t you heard the story of the old organ-grinder who = plied his little trade on 57th St., in front of Carnegie Hall?   One day he was grinding away, with his monkey on a chain holding a tin = cup, as usual.   Suddenly a passerby poked him in the ribs with his walking stick, commanding, =3DB3Faster, Dolt!=3DB2   Grinder, startled, looked at his assailant=3D8Band recognized him as = Arturo Toscanini. =3D20   Next day, the old fella was seen at his usual location. But he=3DB9d put = a placard on his organ: =3DB3Pupil of Toscanini.=3DB2   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: I studied with... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 13:03:32 -0700   For something like that, I usually say "I sang XYZ under N. at thus-and-such a performance."   I WAS privileged to sing "Symphony of Psalms" under Stravinsky at the Oberlin Contemporary Festival, shortly before he died.   Cheers,   Bud   Bob Conway wrote: > At 03:02 PM 8/7/03 -0400, it was written; > >> My impression: it depends on context. Sooner or later, one should be >> explicit. > > > I have to agree, - I was a member of the Hampstead Choral Society, which > was formed and conducted by Martindale Sidwell, He taught me how to sing > Bach! But did I study with him ....? > > During that time we did Benjamin Britten's "St. Nicholas" with Peter > Pears as the soloist, and Benjamin Britten overseeing the last couple of > rehearsals, - does that fall into the "I studied with ..."? > > I might add that Peter Pears literally took over the tenors and basses > when at the penultimate rehearsal we fell apart in the storm chorus, - > and I hasten to add that within the space of half an hour he had got us > all up to speed! He was a wonderful teacher, - but did I study with > him? - I think not, but I got the benefit of his experience. > > I think that it is fine to say that "I worked with ..." and say what you > worked on, but not to say "I studied with ..." > > Just my two penn'orth, > > Bob Conway > > Besides, - then one cannot be considered as embellishing the truth! > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: Re: I studied with... From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 16:16:47 -0400   On 8/7/03 4:03 PM, "quilisma@socal.rr.com" <quilisma@socal.rr.com> wrote:   > I WAS privileged to sing "Symphony of Psalms" under Stravinsky at the > Oberlin Contemporary Festival, shortly before he died.   I didn't realize it was scored for boy sopranos.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: I studied with... From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 16:24:03 -0400   I recall Fenner Douglass telling us of a couple of days in which Marcel Dupre "gave lessons" in Chicago, I think it was. The lessons were very expensive, and were quite short, but it gave everyone license to say, "Student of Marcel Dupre." Fenner went and did it, just to meet and experience the great man. He played one piece, I can't recall which, and the extent of Dupre's comments: "Thank you. Have you anything more difficult?" I wish I knew what Fenner played!   Malcolm   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2003 3:02 PM Subject: RE: I studied with...     > My impression: it depends on context. Sooner or later, one should be > explicit. > > > If you learn something through concentrated effort under the guidance of > someone else, I don't know how else to describe the experience than to say > that you studied with that teacher. Yet there is one hard-and-fast rule. > At least without of the formal evidence of a university stranscript, it is > improper to tell others that you are "a student of X" unless X has given > permission to you to call yourself that. Musicians and teachers have their > good names to protect, and it is only fair that their reputations should not > be sullied by unrepresentative, incompetent, or ridiculous performers who > imply that some genuine artist taught them what they do. >      
(back) Subject: RE: I studied with... From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 16:28:01 -0400   > I didn't realize it [Stravinsky's Symponie de Psaumes] was scored for boy sopranos.   Not surprising. A lot of great choral music is either specifically scored for, or by circumstances clearly intended for, boy choristers; but directors nowadays feel quite free to ignore this important ingredient, yet might pick-pick-pick at their choirs over various minor niceties of authentic period style, as if the latter amounted to something more than deck chairs on the Titanic.    
(back) Subject: Re: I studied with... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 13:53:05 -0700   Um, I think it was 1962, and I would have been 18 (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Alan Freed wrote: > On 8/7/03 4:03 PM, "quilisma@socal.rr.com" <quilisma@socal.rr.com> wrote: > > >>I WAS privileged to sing "Symphony of Psalms" under Stravinsky at the >>Oberlin Contemporary Festival, shortly before he died. > > > I didn't realize it was scored for boy sopranos. > > Alan > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: Pipe Organ Publicity in Nova Scotia From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 18:07:15 -0300   One of Nova Scotias Local Television stations had a few minutes with excerpts of a noon Day Organ recital from St Paul,s Anglican Church in Halifax. The church was built in 1750 and the organ built in 1908 according to what they said. After this piece was done just before the evening news , the hosts of the show said look forward to a piece in the next few weeks about the inner workings of a pipe Organ. Good Publicity Ehh     Danielwh      
(back) Subject: practice possibilities: HELP! From: "tom carter" <tcarter215@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2003 14:07:50 -0700 (PDT)   Hello all:   I'm an organist in the Philadelphia area, who happens to play for a church a good 45 minutes from my home...working nonmusically 9-5, this kind of commute (not to mention heavy use of the sanctuary for other purposes and a lack of respect for the time I block out on the calendar for organ practice) - make it difficult to find adequate practice time. Problem is, I live in an apartment with a narrow entrance, and don't have a lot of extra $$$ for a practice instrument. Any suggestions or leads would be greatly appreciated   Many thanks, Tom   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: I studied with... From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2003 17:09:57 -0400   At 01:53 PM 8/7/03 -0700, Bud wrote:   >Um, I think it was 1962, and I would have been 18 (grin).   To which I might reply;   Yes, but think of it, Bud was probably still a boy treble!   I was myself, up to the mighty age of 14!   Bob Conway